Angler #1

Making the Canal a Real Recreational

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On 1/15/2019 at 4:28 PM, rst3 said:

My limited understanding of this phenomenon remembers 2 distinct spawning grounds for cod: winter harbor or inshore cod, and offshore cod. These different grounds produce fry streams that promote populations in two different areas of the ecosystem. Apparently there was limited/very slow crossover refilling of the inshore areas once the spawning population was removed through overfishing.

interesting-- did a quick lookup for any direct research on GOM cod and found this article here, zemeckis et al 2014 (hope link is ok: https://academic.oup.com/icesjms/article/71/6/1356/2835586)

 

reprinting the abstract:

 

"Rebuilding the Gulf of Maine stock of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) has been much slower than expected. An important source of scientific uncertainty contributing to the difficulties in managing rebuilding has been the lack of understanding of cod population structure. Previous research indicates that the stock functions as a metapopulation that is made up of multiple subpopulations and many finer-scale spawning components. This study investigated fine-scale, multiyear spawning site fidelity by a spring-spawning component of Atlantic cod in the western Gulf of Maine. Movements of acoustically tagged cod (n = 63) with respect to a known spawning site were tracked using passive acoustic telemetry. A large proportion (38–67%) of tagged cod exhibited spawning site fidelity between 2010 and 2012. After adjusting for fishing mortality, natural mortality, and skipped spawning, the estimated rate of spawning site fidelity ranged between 47 and 95% in 2011. Multiyear spawning site fidelity was also observed, with individuals being tracked for up to four consecutive spawning seasons. Spawning site fidelity serves as one of the multiple mechanisms that contribute to the formation and maintenance of the observed metapopulation structure. Spawning site fidelity also reduces the reproductive connectivity among spawning sites, thus delaying both recolonization of abandoned spawning sites and stock rebuilding. Future stock assessment models and fishery management plans that incorporate the metapopulation structure of cod in the Gulf of Maine are expected to be more effective at preventing continued declines in spawning diversity and promoting rebuilding."

 

47-95% spawning site fidelity is pretty dang high for an oceanic fish. 

 

Since cod spawn in winter, it would make sense to me that those winter fisheries would have been targeting cod on or near spawning locations.  And following the research, if you wiped out those populations, they wouldn't necessarily return!  Would be great if management could have protected spawning populations, as the diversity really would have helped during environmental stress like the current warm temperatures. 

 

those fall fish caught on the beaches probably were chasing food i'd guess, though. range expansion due to abundance, just like the stripes.  lots going on, all at once

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25 mins ago, smallstupidfish said:

interesting-- did a quick lookup for any direct research on GOM cod and found this article here, zemeckis et al 2014 (hope link is ok: https://academic.oup.com/icesjms/article/71/6/1356/2835586)

 

reprinting the abstract:

 

"Rebuilding the Gulf of Maine stock of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) has been much slower than expected. An important source of scientific uncertainty contributing to the difficulties in managing rebuilding has been the lack of understanding of cod population structure. Previous research indicates that the stock functions as a metapopulation that is made up of multiple subpopulations and many finer-scale spawning components. This study investigated fine-scale, multiyear spawning site fidelity by a spring-spawning component of Atlantic cod in the western Gulf of Maine. Movements of acoustically tagged cod (n = 63) with respect to a known spawning site were tracked using passive acoustic telemetry. A large proportion (38–67%) of tagged cod exhibited spawning site fidelity between 2010 and 2012. After adjusting for fishing mortality, natural mortality, and skipped spawning, the estimated rate of spawning site fidelity ranged between 47 and 95% in 2011. Multiyear spawning site fidelity was also observed, with individuals being tracked for up to four consecutive spawning seasons. Spawning site fidelity serves as one of the multiple mechanisms that contribute to the formation and maintenance of the observed metapopulation structure. Spawning site fidelity also reduces the reproductive connectivity among spawning sites, thus delaying both recolonization of abandoned spawning sites and stock rebuilding. Future stock assessment models and fishery management plans that incorporate the metapopulation structure of cod in the Gulf of Maine are expected to be more effective at preventing continued declines in spawning diversity and promoting rebuilding."

 

47-95% spawning site fidelity is pretty dang high for an oceanic fish. 

 

Since cod spawn in winter, it would make sense to me that those winter fisheries would have been targeting cod on or near spawning locations.  And following the research, if you wiped out those populations, they wouldn't necessarily return!  Would be great if management could have protected spawning populations, as the diversity really would have helped during environmental stress like the current warm temperatures. 

 

those fall fish caught on the beaches probably were chasing food i'd guess, though. range expansion due to abundance, just like the stripes.  lots going on, all at once

Since we can agree that cod spawned during the winter month by the science of the time , what is to say that some , perhaps all may have been in a spawning mode when they invaded the shore line areas along our coast line. Many of the larger river systems once had schools of ripe females swimming along out Mass Coastline and all the way up to many of the inner harbor areas where the majority of commercial dragger would be tied up. We do not know , but after fishing for almost 5 decades from the shore for cod and witness where they swam I still feel that some how, some where in this winter migration we were having marked cod fish reproduction . Image what it was like before civilization came to the inner cities what it was like along the beaches, piers,river systems during the winter months.  ?

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3 hours ago, TimS said:

Carl, it was never intended to do anything but allow over fishing to continue on over fished stocks. It was an attempt by the fishing industry advocacy folks to remove accountability for stocks they've fought to allow to be over fished. The keywords to look for when they are trying to keep overfishing stocks are "flexibility" and "access". If you see those words coming out of any industry advocacy group, it means they want "access" to stocks that have triggered the biological alarms and need protection...and they want 'flexibility' to ignore the law and invent their own reasons NOT to protect the stocks that have triggered those alarms.  Anyway, luckily, the bill was absolutely and completely gutted before it was passed - there was a lot of absolutely horrific language in the bill originally.  No, it will not improve the health of even one stock - but if it wasn't changed so drastically before it was passed it would have allowed many to be destroyed.  The only victory for the stocks is that it was gutted before it was passed. The industry folks that pulled out all the stops to promote this horrible piece of legislation got a participation trophy...none of the changes they wanted, very thankfully, were included. 

 

There's a discussion on it here - it was a pretty good discussion :th:

 

Just read it all. Once again Politics raises its ugly head and we recreational fishermen get to pay the bill from a resource management tool.

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