john1234

Plug for a very specific application

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Second the Storm Chug Bug try and find older pre rapala ones. They cast really well into the wind. The Bomber 15J with storm suspend dots or strips cast well and slow rolled runs 1-3 ft great bait at dark. I beef up hooks and hardware on both. Good luck happy holidays

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4 hours ago, Wire For Fire said:

One thing I been wanting to try is a 5 or 7 Sluggo or zoom whacky hooked like whacky rigging a senko ... I bet it’s gonna be deadly 

B-I-N-G-O !!  :heart: :heart:

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Just now, yogiiiboy said:

B-I-N-G-O !!  :heart: :heart:

Have you messed with it ? All I know is  I can get about any freshwater predatory species to hit a whacky rigged soft plastic, even when they don’t want to eat I can piss them off enough to swipe at it .. betting stripers no different 

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21 mins ago, Wire For Fire said:

Not for nothing but I have had nights with fish busting and couldn’t get a touch , middle of the night , Hail Mary with white Gibbs pencils and they ending up crushing it .. now I always give it at least a few cast to see .. 

 

but spook and small metal lips and teasers behind egg normally my go to in shallow night time spots 

The thing is I've had bass hit little neck poppers at night too when nothing else would work.

 

Once again a symptom of 'it depends'.

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10 mins ago, Wire For Fire said:

Have you messed with it ? All I know is  I can get about any freshwater predatory species to hit a whacky rigged soft plastic, even when they don’t want to eat I can piss them off enough to swipe at it .. betting stripers no different 

i've been able to coerce them with the 6" & 7.5" in skinny backwater with good, good success......I use the Hogy weighted hooks on the 7.5" which go from 1/4 to 3/8 oz. a piece.  Can make those sluggos dance like a bar room hoe :th: :th:.....

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I’ve done well fishing flats and shallow rocky points with small striper swipers fished  really slow also.  But I always put a small fly on as a teaser.  Most fish will eat the fly in skinny water. I use teasers with a long shank and short hair so it fouls less, or surf candies.  

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26 mins ago, yogiiiboy said:

i've been able to coerce them with the 6" & 7.5" in skinny backwater with good, good success......I use the Hogy weighted hooks on the 7.5" which go from 1/4 to 3/8 oz. a piece.  Can make those sluggos dance like a bar room hoe :th: :th:.....

Right on ... next season I’m gonna have to mess with it 

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I would match the hatch and not worry about casting distance. It really doesn't matter how far you can cast an sp in a cinder worm hatch. Loading a 7" redfin doesn't help if the fish are keying on green crabs. 

 

I don't know the answer to your question. This is what I do know: years ago, I was told by an old man to learn how to do things from the lazy people. Why? I asked. Because a lazy man knows how to do a job with the least effort. 

 

The lazy man approaches this situation not by putting his shoulders into casting but by finding a way to catch the fish at his feet. As he is setting up in the parking lot, he is listening. What sounds is he hearing? Smacks, slurps, swirls? Where are they? Along the grassline, a depth contour or the current line. Did action occur in a certain place?

 

A lazy man doesn't walk into the water and wade out waist deep and start casting. He moves slowly into the water and pays attention to what is moving out of his way. This might surprise you, but a lazy man starts casting before the water covers his ankles. Stripers, even larger ones, don't need more than 14-16" of water to move unobserved. A man standing knee deep on a flat may have every active fish there behind him. In that circumstance, be my guest at trying to hit the opposite shore. 

 

A lazy man knows his quarry. The better you study your foe, the fewer punches you have to throw. Stripers are no different from bass: one well placed cast is better than 10 misses. The lazy fisherman focuses on identifying that one cast. Sure, make blind casts, but search for patterns. 

 

A lazy man knows the lay of the land. I had a guy working for me who was always working when I came around the corner. The other guys thought he was a slacker. He knew the lay of the land, and hucked it when the boss was around. Translated for a striper fisherman, do you need a 60 yard cast when you could slide around and offer a different bait from 10 or 20 yards? Fly fishermen do a lot of this analysis, because they don't have the 60/80/100 yard option. 

 

But what do I know? I'm a redneck

from South Carolina. I'm not as cool as scooby, who can turn you onto tungsten weights and the most exquisite gear. All l can do is translate how a man mops a floor into a fishing strategy. 

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56 mins ago, Sweetwater said:

I would match the hatch and not worry about casting distance. It really doesn't matter how far you can cast an sp in a cinder worm hatch. Loading a 7" redfin doesn't help if the fish are keying on green crabs. 

 

I don't know the answer to your question. This is what I do know: years ago, I was told by an old man to learn how to do things from the lazy people. Why? I asked. Because a lazy man knows how to do a job with the least effort. 

 

The lazy man approaches this situation not by putting his shoulders into casting but by finding a way to catch the fish at his feet. As he is setting up in the parking lot, he is listening. What sounds is he hearing? Smacks, slurps, swirls? Where are they? Along the grassline, a depth contour or the current line. Did action occur in a certain place?

 

A lazy man doesn't walk into the water and wade out waist deep and start casting. He moves slowly into the water and pays attention to what is moving out of his way. This might surprise you, but a lazy man starts casting before the water covers his ankles. Stripers, even larger ones, don't need more than 14-16" of water to move unobserved. A man standing knee deep on a flat may have every active fish there behind him. In that circumstance, be my guest at trying to hit the opposite shore. 

 

A lazy man knows his quarry. The better you study your foe, the fewer punches you have to throw. Stripers are no different from bass: one well placed cast is better than 10 misses. The lazy fisherman focuses on identifying that one cast. Sure, make blind casts, but search for patterns. 

 

A lazy man knows the lay of the land. I had a guy working for me who was always working when I came around the corner. The other guys thought he was a slacker. He knew the lay of the land, and hucked it when the boss was around. Translated for a striper fisherman, do you need a 60 yard cast when you could slide around and offer a different bait from 10 or 20 yards? Fly fishermen do a lot of this analysis, because they don't have the 60/80/100 yard option. 

 

But what do I know? I'm a redneck

from South Carolina. I'm not as cool as scooby, who can turn you onto tungsten weights and the most exquisite gear. All l can do is translate how a man mops a floor into a fishing strategy. 

Great reply

A so called lazy man=smart man

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1 hour ago, Sweetwater said:

I would match the hatch and not worry about casting distance. It really doesn't matter how far you can cast an sp in a cinder worm hatch. Loading a 7" redfin doesn't help if the fish are keying on green crabs. 

 

I don't know the answer to your question. This is what I do know: years ago, I was told by an old man to learn how to do things from the lazy people. Why? I asked. Because a lazy man knows how to do a job with the least effort. 

 

The lazy man approaches this situation not by putting his shoulders into casting but by finding a way to catch the fish at his feet. As he is setting up in the parking lot, he is listening. What sounds is he hearing? Smacks, slurps, swirls? Where are they? Along the grassline, a depth contour or the current line. Did action occur in a certain place?

 

A lazy man doesn't walk into the water and wade out waist deep and start casting. He moves slowly into the water and pays attention to what is moving out of his way. This might surprise you, but a lazy man starts casting before the water covers his ankles. Stripers, even larger ones, don't need more than 14-16" of water to move unobserved. A man standing knee deep on a flat may have every active fish there behind him. In that circumstance, be my guest at trying to hit the opposite shore. 

 

A lazy man knows his quarry. The better you study your foe, the fewer punches you have to throw. Stripers are no different from bass: one well placed cast is better than 10 misses. The lazy fisherman focuses on identifying that one cast. Sure, make blind casts, but search for patterns. 

 

A lazy man knows the lay of the land. I had a guy working for me who was always working when I came around the corner. The other guys thought he was a slacker. He knew the lay of the land, and hucked it when the boss was around. Translated for a striper fisherman, do you need a 60 yard cast when you could slide around and offer a different bait from 10 or 20 yards? Fly fishermen do a lot of this analysis, because they don't have the 60/80/100 yard option. 

 

But what do I know? I'm a redneck

from South Carolina. I'm not as cool as scooby, who can turn you onto tungsten weights and the most exquisite gear. All l can do is translate how a man mops a floor into a fishing strategy. 

I think you have the term “lazy” confused with “experienced”. I don’t know of any “lazy” people to have become successful by doing the minimum. Experienced people, those who through trial and error have evaluated what works and what doesn’t and who apply that knowledge when faced with similar situations are almost always successful. While I disagree With your choice of words I wholeheartedly agree with the body of your statement, taking the time to recognize that just because you can ( cast farther, wade deeper) doesn’t always mean you should. 

Happy New Year!

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2 hours ago, Dave T. said:

I think you have the term “lazy” confused with “experienced”. I don’t know of any “lazy” people to have become successful by doing the minimum. Experienced people, those who through trial and error have evaluated what works and what doesn’t and who apply that knowledge when faced with similar situations are almost always successful. While I disagree With your choice of words I wholeheartedly agree with the body of your statement, taking the time to recognize that just because you can ( cast farther, wade deeper) doesn’t always mean you should. 

Happy New Year!

in essence......doing more with less   :shrug:

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22 mins ago, HugeDinghy said:

that's on of the weirder posts that ive read here. 

Not sure I understood it myself but I appreciate everyone’s input in my threads.

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