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B&Ts still open

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How about the tackle shops that are still open, lets learn from the past but look to the future...……………  The big box stores and the internet have cut some very serious inroads into the mom and pops shops in the past decade, and if they are to survive they need all the support they can get.   Remember:

 

When you buy from a small mom and pop business,

you are not helping a CEO buy his third vacation home.

You are helping a young child get dance lessons,

a little boy getting a team jersey,

a mom and dad putting food on the table,

a family paying a mortgage or a student paying for an education.

 

Their customers are the shareholders and the customers are the ones they strive to make happy...……………... 

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There is a new shop I noticed in Taunton on Bay street just off 495 actually... I haven't stopped in yet.   Could be awful convenient for folks heading to the cape if their hours are right and the carry the right stuff.

 

I'm also hoping to give them some shiner business this winter!

 

Lucky Bait in Warren RI is my go to place.

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33 mins ago, pogie_boy said:

There is a new shop I noticed in Taunton on Bay street just off 495 actually... I haven't stopped in yet.   Could be awful convenient for folks heading to the cape if their hours are right and the carry the right stuff.

 

I'm also hoping to give them some shiner business this winter!

 

Lucky Bait in Warren RI is my go to place.

Where is this shop you mention?  Is it near BJs or further down near Sabbatia Lake?  I’ve driven by there recently and haven’t noticed it. Could be good for shiners if we ever get safe ice. 

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1 hour ago, b-ware said:

How about the tackle shops that are still open, lets learn from the past but look to the future...……………  The big box stores and the internet have cut some very serious inroads into the mom and pops shops in the past decade, and if they are to survive they need all the support they can get.   Remember:

 

When you buy from a small mom and pop business,

you are not helping a CEO buy his third vacation home.

You are helping a young child get dance lessons,

a little boy getting a team jersey,

a mom and dad putting food on the table,

a family paying a mortgage or a student paying for an education.

 

Their customers are the shareholders and the customers are the ones they strive to make happy...……………... 

Bernie I am touched with the whole paragraph you put up and it goes with out saying that you are 1000 percent correct . Those of us that have established a great deal of re-pore over the years with many shops no longer here with us , need to also remind ourselves that the future is in the past. We still have those who will be learning from the conversations at the local shops and taking home something they can try to test themselves and by supporting the present local shops that adhere to good relationships with there customers we all just enhance the whole traditions of passing it on to the next generation .  Most shop owners today have to work long hours all week long, just to pay the bills and keep a little left over for the slow winter months when most today close , unlike in another time when most local shops stayed open with limited hours to serve there faithful customers.  Then it was another time for sure when the coast line of our state was beaming with all sorts of fish resources to fish on all year long. Now that is no longer the case, so the shop owners today need to be more people oriented and smarter on what they stock on the shelves. They also need to find a stick that brings in new customers and keep them coming back for more. Another good topic for discussion during these winter months for sure.

 

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7 mins ago, z-man said:

Where is this shop you mention?  Is it near BJs or further down near Sabbatia Lake?  I’ve driven by there recently and haven’t noticed it. Could be good for shiners if we ever get safe ice. 

 

Right across from BJs I believe in the same plaza as the convenience store and dunkin (used to be Tedeschis ?  I think?)

 

I saw it on my way home from work when I went that way to stop for Chinese food on the way.

 

Irony:  it could be in what used to be a Chinese food restaruant.

 

I just haven't been back that way to check it out.

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The big brand names have to make it a level playing field so the little guy can compete with the big chains?  

They are to blame for putting the little guy out of business 

That’s why when you go to a little B&T store you don’t see a lot of Reels in there stores.   That can’t compete ?   

They know it?    So they have to sell other things?  Maybe custom rods or plugs ? They need a great location , so that when something is needed the last minute , they will come to them . 

They have to have something special to survive.   Maybe classes on fly fishing or how it do classes ?  Tournaments Maybe a Registed scale outside the door to weigh fish ?  Give some info on were and how to fish.  It’s for sure they don’t have it easy.  

They cant be crabby to the public 

Long hours. And crazy times.

 I wanted to open a store a long time ago  I never forgot what  Al Cappy told me 

ForGet  About It 

It!s Seasonable 

When everyone is fishing, that’s the time you will be in the store selling and making rods.   You won’t be fishing my son. ?   Fishermen should never own stores ?   

Edited by ccb

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In my opinion, the little shops need to take advantage of more than just bait and tackle. I really don't see too many shops that are selling stuff like clothing, hats and accessories. Brands like yeti, salty crew, costa, huk, etc. This is stuff that fishermen and non-fishermen want and really drive business.

 

There are ways to adapt to the growing online marketplace. Truth be told though, the days of selling bait and tackle alone will no longer keep you in business. As someone who is familiar with the retail market, I'd love an opportunity to merchandise some of these shops.

Edited by JTR

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That’s why there going out of business 

2 hours ago, JTR said:

In my opinion, the little shops need to take advantage of more than just bait and tackle. I really don't see too many shops that are selling stuff like clothing, hats and accessories. Brands like yeti, salty crew, costa, huk, etc. This is stuff that fishermen and non-fishermen want and really drive business.

 

There are ways to adapt to the growing online marketplace. Truth be told though, the days of selling bait and tackle alone will no longer keep you in business. As someone who is familiar with the retail market, I'd love an opportunity to merchandise some of these shops.

They don’t have the money to stock those items. 

The way they survive is doing it on the side or selling out of the cellar? 

They are making pennies on the dollar. 

Those big co.s want to sell in volume

and to do that they give big discounts to big Co.s.  

I don’t think they want to give you consignment.  

Limaglas in the old days made you buy large amounts to get a good discount

For Cappy to be NE distributer he had to buy large amounts. Even when he didn’t want to.   

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Bait and Taxkle shops are my kryptonite, I can’t drive past one without going in and buying stuff I need and a pile of stuff I don’t. For my wife it’s shoes, for me it’s lures, leader and some of whatever else is in the shop. My local shop is great, they will leave out whatever I ask for if I can’t make it down before closing and in turn I have them order what they don’t carry for me so they can make a living. Couple a bucks markup for all the intel I receive and bait they have left in buckets for me after closing is well worth it. 

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Another thing that bait shops need to do to keep business is to carry new lures from smaller manufacturers.  You can go to any Walmart and buy Bombers, SPs and gulp but you can’t get baits by Hurley, Hogy, Super Strike, etc. Why are most shops not carrying this stuff?  It’s the same with freshwater tackle too. There probably isn’t a shop in NewEngland that sells half the brands of tackle that Tackle Warehouse sells. 

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I think the secret is the local bait and tackle shops need to market to their local fishery.  We all like to catch stripers in the North East, but the best B&T stores in each state do not carry the same gear. 

 

while some maybe comment/argue here that what i'm saying isn't true and they've caught fish with these lures in certain places, sure - we've all caught fish with random lures in random locations, but - 

 

The most successful bait shops in my eyes focus on the following

 

Boston - mack plugs, bunker, things of that nature

Cape - magic swimmers, pencil poppers, jigs

RI - small plastics/needles

NY - bunker/needles

 

I'm trying to stay as generalized as possible with my locations and plug choices obviously, but the point is - the best shops are very very specialized in what they carry.  I'm from the cape - there are some shops that tailor very well to the specific areas in which they're located on the cape.  There are some that clearly open a fishing lure catalog and order 2 things from each of the major providers. 

 

a good shop needs to look at local manufacturers and tailor their shop to their home waters in order to be successful.  I think this is where they can overtake somewhere like BPS, who simply opens a catalog and orders random stuff from big name providers.

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Local B&T's will stay in business if they keep employees who know and understand local fishing.  People go to local establishments for the knowledge.  That's why you pay the premium price. It's no different in the heavy equipment industry.  If the people selling/servicing the equipment have no knowledge, why even go?  I hate going to local B&T's here in Corpus that don't care about your business.  Customer service goes a long way.  

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18 hours ago, JTR said:

In my opinion, the little shops need to take advantage of more than just bait and tackle. I really don't see too many shops that are selling stuff like clothing, hats and accessories. Brands like yeti, salty crew, costa, huk, etc. This is stuff that fishermen and non-fishermen want and really drive business.

 

There are ways to adapt to the growing online marketplace. Truth be told though, the days of selling bait and tackle alone will no longer keep you in business. As someone who is familiar with the retail market, I'd love an opportunity to merchandise some of these shops.

From experience, the choice of what to stock can be a difficult one. Knowing exactly who your customer is and what their budget and tastes are is critical. In the beginning when I went to buying shows I was overwhelmed. On plugs, I would buy three sizes and 8 colors, from 3-4 manufacturers. Three years later I would have a ton on the shelf, and be re-ordering 1 size, 3 colors, from 1-2 manufacturers. I would buy the minimal dollar allowed from St Croix, probably about 30 rods, the $90-140 rods sold, the other ones sat. I would buy inexpensive ones from Tsunami, they all sold. Custom plugs, in my spot forget about it, Roberts rangers, kastmasters etc. I had to learn that the overwhelming % of my customers were families who were not buying high end, and would only pay $10 versus $20 for a plug. 

 

The other stuff - clothing was big, t-shirts, sweat shirts, hats - high profit margins, and not really expensive to buy. If their were some hot clothing items that I could get a deal on, I would try them. Sunglasses - would sell a lot more tsunami and Flying fisherman at $20 than costa Del Mar at $200. Putting line on reels was a big item, good returns and relatively high volume. Reels - tried van stahl once, nope, maybe now with the less expensive ones, retail $450 or so, but $1000, no way. Colors, sizes, models - as a little guy I couldn’t afford $10k in that inventory sitting there to get 1-2 sales every few months. Same with high end Shimano, etc. Rods, as said above.  Rod and reel combos, buy at $29 and sell at $69 all day long, for the non-serious fisherman. Coolers -tried the high end, nope, different sizes, and too much space required to store them. On the other hand buy 200 styrofoam coolers at $3 and sell for $6 for some beer and live eels. Plastic sand spikes, hundreds of them, but when you buy the fancy metal ones at the show and you sell one every few weeks, no more. Koozies always sold, hundreds of them.,

 

I guess bottom line is due to inventory carrying costs, you really have to know your customer and what sells and what doesn’t. And you definitely need some of the other stuff, because it can give you higher volume as well as get the other half to come in and buy stuff. We even had custom made Nautical fishing greeting cards for awhile, as well as some sea shell house decorations, beach toys such as inflatables. I really wanted to sell breakfast sandwiches and coffee, but health regulations etc put an end to that. But, alittle bigger shop with more traffic, people coming off the beach in the morning, or going on for the day, a simple deli might add to profits and get people to wander around the shop more.

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5 hours ago, WildBillVMI said:

Local B&T's will stay in business if they keep employees who know and understand local fishing.  People go to local establishments for the knowledge.  That's why you pay the premium price. It's no different in the heavy equipment industry.  If the people selling/servicing the equipment have no knowledge, why even go?  I hate going to local B&T's here in Corpus that don't care about your business.  Customer service goes a long way.  

The business of today needs all of the customer service it can muster to be successful , no matter where they are located. It is the tangible information and guidance that is free that will in the end bring those to a shop to buy and being treated respectfully also has its rewards. Give the customer what they want and slowly build a re pore and they will pass the word on to others and build a base of customers for in the end you will survive . I give you one shop here on the cape and that is Red Top that has managed through more tough times over more years then most to remain steadfast as a place, you for the most part feel welcome to shop.

The times of the alcoholic owners can no longer be tolerated in today society ,. which back in another time was how many kept them coming back by having a place where they could all drink and talk about fishing at the same time . We had some great shop owners that just could not leave it alone and for me shorten there stay with us back in another time.   

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5 mins ago, fishonnelsons said:

From experience, the choice of what to stock can be a difficult one. Knowing exactly who your customer is and what their budget and tastes are is critical. In the beginning when I went to buying shows I was overwhelmed. On plugs, I would buy three sizes and 8 colors, from 3-4 manufacturers. Three years later I would have a ton on the shelf, and be re-ordering 1 size, 3 colors, from 1-2 manufacturers. I would buy the minimal dollar allowed from St Croix, probably about 30 rods, the $90-140 rods sold, the other ones sat. I would buy inexpensive ones from Tsunami, they all sold. Custom plugs, in my spot forget about it, Roberts rangers, kastmasters etc. I had to learn that the overwhelming % of my customers were families who were not buying high end, and would only pay $10 versus $20 for a plug. 

 

The other stuff - clothing was big, t-shirts, sweat shirts, hats - high profit margins, and not really expensive to buy. If their were some hot clothing items that I could get a deal on, I would try them. Sunglasses - would sell a lot more tsunami and Flying fisherman at $20 than costa Del Mar at $200. Putting line on reels was a big item, good returns and relatively high volume. Reels - tried van stahl once, nope, maybe now with the less expensive ones, retail $450 or so, but $1000, no way. Colors, sizes, models - as a little guy I couldn’t afford $10k in that inventory sitting there to get 1-2 sales every few months. Same with high end Shimano, etc. Rods, as said above.  Rod and reel combos, buy at $29 and sell at $69 all day long, for the non-serious fisherman. Coolers -tried the high end, nope, different sizes, and too much space required to store them. On the other hand buy 200 styrofoam coolers at $3 and sell for $6 for some beer and live eels. Plastic sand spikes, hundreds of them, but when you buy the fancy metal ones at the show and you sell one every few weeks, no more. Koozies always sold, hundreds of them.,

 

I guess bottom line is due to inventory carrying costs, you really have to know your customer and what sells and what doesn’t. And you definitely need some of the other stuff, because it can give you higher volume as well as get the other half to come in and buy stuff. We even had custom made Nautical fishing greeting cards for awhile, as well as some sea shell house decorations, beach toys such as inflatables. I really wanted to sell breakfast sandwiches and coffee, but health regulations etc put an end to that. But, alittle bigger shop with more traffic, people coming off the beach in the morning, or going on for the day, a simple deli might add to profits and get people to wander around the shop more.

Richard all good points and right from the horses mouth sort of speak  How goes the charter business these days?

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