Mr. Bigdeal

Can it happen again......Maybe.

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33 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, JerseySwells said:

Speaking of North Carolina, I lived there for two years in grad school and get emails from Fisheries management still. They are voting soon on potentially closing recreational and commercial striped bass harvest. They had two good spawn years down there with their local population and want to protect that  with closing the fishery....

There's the true danger to us and the fishery. Those "smart' folks that would "protect" the resource....

And destroy the economy built on that as has ben done

 

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8 mins ago, Ben Lippen said:

There's the true danger to us and the fishery. Those "smart' folks that would "protect" the resource....

And destroy the economy built on that as has ben done

 

I believe it’s a non-harvest. So C&R only for Recs. 

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8 hours ago, Harf said:

Sure would like to see the Cape May Rips turn on again...

 

You, me, and the 10,000 boats from Townsend’s to the lower bay. What a fishery that was. 

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On 12/29/2018 at 10:30 AM, Mr. Bigdeal said:

How many of us have stood on the beach during the fall run and seen the fog of birds out there near the horizon.....the migratory schools moving south along with the multitudes of bait.......

But that's bout 1 to 1.5 miles, well within the EEZ line.

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On 12/29/2018 at 7:31 AM, Drew C. said:

Gotta love the myth of the ginormous offshore schools of bass. Since santa didn't bring them in now maybe the easter bunny can do it in the spring.

It reminds me of the early Industrial Age when Buffalo hides were the primary resource for making mechanical drive belts in steam powered equipment.

 

Buffalo were hunted just for their hides and their carcasses left to rot.  Early environmentalists said there were only a few hundred left and they must be conserved.  The Buffalo hunters and industrialists laughed and said the Buffalo were endless.  They built towns like Dodge City that were dependent on the Buffalo industry.

 

When the Buffalo dwindled, the hunters claimed, "There's a big herd just outside the Candaian border that comes through every year or so.  We just have to wait.  They waited, and they waited, and they waited...and the Buffalo never came.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

On 1/19/2019 at 8:40 AM, Harf said:

Sure would like to see the Cape May Rips turn on again...

 

On 1/19/2019 at 4:44 PM, PhilCVG said:

 

You, me, and the 10,000 boats from Townsend’s to the lower bay. What a fishery that was. 

See......for us New Jerseyans..........once the reality of the above observation is exposed, that's when YOU KNOW the Striped Bass population is in decline AND in trouble.

 

NO if, ands or buts.......:dismay:

Edited by yogiiiboy

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13 hours ago, yogiiiboy said:

 

See......for us New Jerseyans..........once the reality of the above observation is exposed, that's when YOU KNOW the Striped Bass population is in decline AND in trouble.

 

NO if, ands or buts.......:dismay:

 

I’m not sure what you mean?

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5 mins ago, PhilCVG said:

 

I’m not sure what you mean?

The Cape May Rips are one of the better known spring and fall striper grounds on the East Coast.  Once there’s been evidence of traffic decline in this particular location, you can bet there’s most probably a Striped Bass population dilemma staring you right in the face.

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3 mins ago, yogiiiboy said:

The Cape May Rips are one of the better known spring and fall striper grounds on the East Coast.  Once there’s been evidence of traffic decline in this particular location, you can bet there’s most probably a Striped Bass population dilemma staring you right in the face.

 

Gotcha. And totally agree. 

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Because there are no fish in one area the bass are in trouble is over simplifying the problem.  There are micro-populations of these things. Some get fished out at a faster rate than can be replaced- which i don't believe happens very easily.  I don't  believe that bass are transient fish and move around all over the place.  We have this fantasy where if one fish is taken from a spot then it's going to get replaced with another from this giant pool of bass that does not exist.  We shouldn't manage them under one umbrella population.   If there's plenty in one spot and very few in another- it doesn't necessarily mean anything.  While there may be the right number under the umbrella, we are obviously taking too many from those sub-groups of fish and that is impacting the fishing.   What data does the ALS  tagging program show? I would bet that these fish are not usually nomadic.

 

Someone said 10,000 boats in the CM rips.  Ya think maybe we shouldn't all be pounding it hard at the same time? 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

On 12/28/2018 at 8:56 AM, Mr. Bigdeal said:

Quote: "Then, there’s the reports from commercial fishermen who say there are acres of stripers packed in, further out -- well past the three-mile state limit."

Related image

 

After just an OK surf season, I'm wondering if there is anything that will bring the fish in again like in the good ol' days or are they gone forever....are bait and beach structure the only considerations.

why would you begin to believe commercial fisherman.  "acres of bass" was probably followed by increasing commercial quotas.  for what it's worth all my tuna fishing buddies who boat beyond the 3 mile line say that the population of those schools are in rapid decline

Edited by ferret

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Yes, it's all true. The Comms. and the recs. are all lying about the abundance/and/or/lack of fish.  How that matters as opposed to the truth of the obvious loss of the resource (fish) is beyond my comprehension. 

The one lone fact that we can absolutely rely on is that far too many species of fish and game have ben over-harvested. Many to the point of extinction. That fact alone should send chills down any persons spine. But money does evil things to weak people. The Omega company snake oil sales pitch is the western equivalent of the Chinese rhino horn powder erection cure. It's all bullcrap.  I'm not about about destroying commercial fishing, but they damned well know that they are going to destroy this resource and then move on to another. They can lie to themselves and tell tales of their grandfathers, but once the resource is gone, it's only themselves to blame.

It's just plain stupid to even believe that a resource can recover, or even be managed, against modern methods of capture. Let alone the disgusting waste of the so-called by-catch.

And to say that recreational catches amount to much close to the haul of the boats, is just a bald faced lie. Always has ben, always will be. Why doesnt anyone want to speak the truth?

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Posted (edited) · Report post

With what's goin' on with the inshore fishery, who knows what ?   ie. Rutgers Sonic Blasting off Barnegat and beach replenishment / removal of structure to  mention a few..

Edited by Mr. Bigdeal

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