bob_G

And yet another tick disease

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22 hours ago, Fuzzytrout said:

ticks are the devil......

 

I've had lymes, anaplasmosis, and erlichiosis.   Erlichiosis was hands down the worst.

 

And now I'm allergic to red meat thanks to a tick bite.  

 

all ticks can rot in hell. 

I have to agree with you there. I have had Lymes and Erilichiosis and the Erilichiosis was the worst.  Similar to Lymes in some ways, but with more extensive joint damage, malaise, lethargy, head aches, and nausea.  It also requires higher and longer doses of doxycycline which in itself is awful. I had a couple of specialists treat me and they only gave me two to three weeks of the anitbiotics and the Erilichia kept coming back until I did five weeks of even higher doses. The Lymes does more neurological damage, but the Erlichia is pure misery.  If you have nausea and vicious head aches it is probably Erilichiosis.

 

The Herxheimer Reaction is worse with Erilichiosis as well. When you first start the Doxycycline and all the spirochetes start dying and releasing their neurotoxins you feel like you are dying from nerve poisoning.

 

I almost lost a puppy to Erlichiosis. Doxycycline saved him.

Edited by Jay Blair

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1 hour ago, BrianBM said:

I've heard of that before.  Tick-borne diseases do weird things to people.  

What do you suppose it does to dogs and other animals they bite and infect?  Multiple infections over  a short period of time does not appear to be very good for dogs long term and that is one reason we all need to be vigilant with the ones we love , no matter if it is a dog or us humans . When ever I would be out in the woods with my pup , the first thing home was to do a full body inspection on both of us  and even at that at times we would miss one , but catch it the next day. We can provide all the protection we want from tick collars lyme shot , performing a inspection` every day when in high yield tick areas is still the best solution to reducing harm from a tick bite to our pets and not have to treat them after the fact as it is not a good practice on both humans and animals long term.

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The red meat allergy is from a carbohydrate called "Alpha gal" that the ticks injects into you along with the host of other nasty crap.

 

after exposure it causes an immune system response when exposed to red meat.  

 

google alpha gal or tick bite red meat allergy there is all sorts of into out there now.

 

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41 mins ago, Angler #1 said:

What do you suppose it does to dogs and other animals they bite and infect?  Multiple infections over  a short period of time does not appear to be very good for dogs long term and that is one reason we all need to be vigilant with the ones we love , no matter if it is a dog or us humans . When ever I would be out in the woods with my pup , the first thing home was to do a full body inspection on both of us  and even at that at times we would miss one , but catch it the next day. We can provide all the protection we want from tick collars lyme shot , performing a inspection` every day when in high yield tick areas is still the best solution to reducing harm from a tick bite to our pets and not have to treat them after the fact as it is not a good practice on both humans and animals long term.

The Lymes vaccines for dogs can be effective.  Initially our vet was not a believer so we did not vaccinate our first two dogs and they had multiple infections that needed to be treated. Our third dog had the vaccinations and booster shots and has never shown any symptoms even though he has had a number of tick bites.

 

While deer can carry Lymes the biggest vectors of most of the tick diseases are mice, chipmunks and other small rodents. While the diseases sometimes die out in the adult ticks the tiny tick nymphs recently nourished from an infected host blood meal are the worst. They tiny nymphs are also the hardest to find and detect.

 

We are also careful, but the nymphs are hard to find unless your dog is white.

 

Many years ago when I was a kid we rarely saw deer ticks and most of the ticks were wood or dog ticks.  Now there are deer ticks everywhere.

Edited by Jay Blair

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Out here in Turnipsville we have deer ticks like you wouldn't believe...……………  We vaccinate the dog, put a Soresto collar on him, spray the yard with an organic spray and use a tick repellant when we go into the woods...……...

 

A little common sense goes a long way...…………...

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It is great for clothing, but you can also have your property sprayed and create mouse boxes with nesting material treated with spray. The mice are the biggest problem.

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On 12/21/2018 at 8:06 AM, b-ware said:

What were you using for a tick repellant??????

That's the problem Bernie. Charlie is extremely allergic to tick repellant. I mean a severe reaction that lasts 18 hours. So as a result I just do the best I can. Brush him thoroughly after each day afield, and then do another hand search at home.

I have him tested annually and he also gets vaccinated against Lyme, and has been since he was a pup.

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13 mins ago, bob_G said:

That's the problem Bernie. Charlie is extremely allergic to tick repellant. I mean a severe reaction that lasts 18 hours. So as a result I just do the best I can. Brush him thoroughly after each day afield, and then do another hand search at home.

I have him tested annually and he also gets vaccinated against Lyme, and has been since he was a pup.

That sucks for an outdoor dog...……….

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22 mins ago, b-ware said:

That sucks for an outdoor dog...……….

Yea it is. As far as Lyme, either the vaccine worked or I've been lucky since there's been no Lyme.

But I knew some other tick disease was a possibilty, and he got anaplasmosis.  The good news is his appetite is over the top, as is his energy level. Still has 2 weeks worth of anti bs left. Hopefully he'll put this behind him and never look back.

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23 mins ago, bob_G said:

Yea it is. As far as Lyme, either the vaccine worked or I've been lucky since there's been no Lyme.

But I knew some other tick disease was a possibilty, and he got anaplasmosis.  The good news is his appetite is over the top, as is his energy level. Still has 2 weeks worth of anti bs left. Hopefully he'll put this behind him and never look back.

And that's a good thing...………..

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Bob,

Like I said, one of my labs tested positive for anaplasmosis from when she was 5 or 6 until I lost her to cancer last May when she was 10. She had several antibiotic treatments, but they eventually said, it was chronic after I complained that the vet kept saying the treatments were going to do the trick.

She also had back to back knee/ACL surgeries, so it was difficult to determine if her crying/discomfort was the anaplasmosis/inflammation of the joints or the knees-not all the time, but often enough to cause concern.

Good news on the energy level and appetite. Good luck the rest of the way. My other lab just had her annual Lymes shot this morning.

 

I have lost two labs to cancer, and I sometimes wonder if the Frontline type tick and flea treatments have a connection to the cancer.

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