SallyGrowler

Reloading...

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Purchased a Classic Lee Re-loader kit in .45-70Govt

All you need is a nylon faced hammer and flat steady surface.

 

I have been doing weekly range trips shooting a variety of .45-70 ammo.

The Marlin GBL likes Hornady Leverevolution 325gr Flextips. The groups with iron sights have been great 75-yards and in.

I couldn't hit the 100-yd target because I could barely see it (vision ain't what it used to be...)

Surprising the 405 Gr Ultramax cowboy stuff is grouping well with the Hornady off the bench  - very light recoil compared to the Hornady.

The HSM 405 gr. Cowboy loads are just above the min velocity threshold I want for hunting pigs (Some say 900 fps at impact).

While the HSM loads are rated hotter than the Ultramax, the HSMs have a more severe drop.

 

Where the heck am I going with this?

I have a plastic ammo can rapidly filling up with once-fired brass.

.45-70 ammo ain't cheap.

If I start reloading for range sessions it should save me some dough.

As I improve I will experiment with hunting loads but that will require additional precision instruments such as a digital scale, calipers and a case trimmer.

 

The classic Lee kit ranges in price from $25 to $40 and i is probably a good stocking stuffer for Christmas.

I will pick one up for the FIL and some other shooting friends.

With all these wacky fun control laws hitting the states - Cali passed an Ammo registration law - it's time to learn what it takes to restock.

 

Just think of it, Florida almost elected a Proud democratic Socialist.

 

Ladies and Gents, we are one generation away from the US turning into California.

Not a question of "if" but "when".

 

 

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Get the Hornady Reloading manual and follow their loads. Logcabinlooms has a video of him loading 45-70 ammo with the Classic Reloader. 

Edited by biggstriper

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I would look around for a used single stage loader, carbide dies and a powder scale. I would imagine that it would be a lot quicker and easier than using the classic, especially with a large straight wall cartridge like the 45-70.

At least get a scale to weigh powder, so you can be sure of how much powder you are dropping in the case.

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I live in a condo. I don't have the space to set-up a loading bench. I don't even have space for a table.

The breech lock hand press will probably be the next addition.

Ordered the digital scale and case chamfering tool.

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11 hours ago, SallyGrowler said:

I live in a condo. I don't have the space to set-up a loading bench. I don't even have space for a table.

The breech lock hand press will probably be the next addition.

Ordered the digital scale and case chamfering tool.

I use the Breech Lock Hand Press.  IMO- you don't really need to chamfer the cases with this round. I also use the hand primer tool (I think) it's made by Lee.

Edited by biggstriper

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Thanks - I would need the chamfer when loading Hornady FTX bullets since case trimming is necessary. The standard case length on once-fired HSM or Ultramax brass is slightly longer than the Hornady FTX brass specs. 

 

I will move on to the hand press after getting my feet wet with the classic loader.

 

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:headscratch:

wash your brass in the sink with soap and water and q tips.  then follow up with iosso brass cleaning solution $12.

 

Lee Breech Lock Hand Press - $40

Lee Universal Depriming and Decapping Die - $14

 

LE Wilson case gauge - $18

Lee value case trimmer - $12

Lee quick trim die - $12

Any chamfer & deburr tool - $15+

 

Lee Ram priming tool - $13

 

RCBS powder trickler $20

Lee powder scale - $29

 

Lee 3 die set - $33 (may or may not include shellholder)

 

imperial sizing die wax - $10

 

dial calipers - $20

 

 


 

 

 

 

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I have like half a dozen lee hand presses lying around the house for decapping fired brass.  they are one of my favorite and most frequently used tools.

 

funny thing is, most of the brass i decap doesn't get used.  it gets sold after i decap and tumble it.  those things have paid for themselves many multiple times over.

 

 

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