tomkaz

Beach-fishing fat-tire bike project

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113 posts in this topic

46 mins ago, tomkaz said:

@beerdoh - Great feedback and advice and consistent with what I am thinking. 

 

Should I have the bike shop apply Frame Saver before he assembles? The Walgoose frame is steel so an internal rust film could minimize internal rust out.  

 

However, the guy has never heard of Frame Saver or boiled linseed oil application and I worry that he won’t know enough to protect threads, seat stem tube, etc. is it worth it if I generally take good care of my gear? 

My fishing bike is also steel. It was my off-road bike for a year before that and all I did was spray the inside of the tubes with Boeshield when it was new. It's hard to ensure you are reaching every nook and cranny but I honestly wouldn't worry too much about it. In all my years of riding I've never had a steel bike frame rust through and I've had a lot of bikes. Grease the seatpost, grease all threads (bottle holder threads included), if you are replacing the bottom bracket it will be sealed but grease the threads on the BB cups. You may want to make sure the headset is adequately greased. Don't get any grease or lube on your brake pads. You will regret that for a long time if you do. You can de-grease the rotors but harder with the pads.

Over time paint will chip off the wheel dropouts. It's unavoidable when you take the wheels off and put them back on. I get the rust off those areas and use a paint based Sharpie pen to reseal. A bit of grease doesn't hurt on the dropouts either. 

FYI, Boeshield is a good replacement for Framesaver and dries into a film. It's also a great lube for chain's, derailleurs, reels, etc. Most bike shops carry the spray and drip bottles.

Keep us posted on progress.

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1 hour ago, Johnnymiz said:

the mongoose goes pretty well on sand.
you might think about putting a motor on it ;-)
my mongoose will go about 25mph for about an hour on a charge. 
and if i run out of juice, it pedals just fine
 

2014081095102447.jpg

2014081095102609.jpg

Wow. Now that's a Road Warrior contraption if ever I saw one. Did you build that? What does that thing weigh? Looks like you are missing a pedal/crank arm.

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ha.. it kinda weighs a LOT.... 3 12v motorcycle batteries to power it.. the damned lithium ones were really spendy.  yes, i built it as a winter project with my brother. he did the figuring, i did the building.

yeah, in that pic we were in the middle of putting the final touches on and didnt have the left crank on it. one of the problems with the mongoose is that  some of it is proprietary... like the front sprocket assembly wasnt the standard size, so i had to actually weld on a new pedal bearing hub or whatever its called.  a bit of a pain in the butt. but the bike turned out well. 
wouldve been easier to just put a front hub motor on it, but the guy doing the figuring didnt want to do that.
with the bike, cost way less than $1k to put together.
in 2015, the cheapest fat tire ebike was like $3k.. so we gave it a shot.

Edited by Johnnymiz

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thanks. yes, it  was a fun project and we got a serviceable e-bike out of the deal. it sits and rides like a 1920s harley. weighs about the same, too. hahhahah. but itll do 35mph and the range is about 30 miles. i will prob retrofit some lithium batteries when they get cheap enough. cut the weight.
it runs the beach well.

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On 12/7/2018 at 1:22 PM, pescatore said:

Steel frame on the beach, no beuno in my opinion. Even if you blast it with frame-saver, a cheap steel frame is gonna rust. I ride a lot, my best road bikes are steel, but it's the wrong frame material for your purpose. You're also paying a weight penalty.

 

If I were building a fatbike for beach fishing, riding the kind of distances you describe, I'd go with an aluminum-framed single speed. Keep it as simple as possible. No derailleurs, shift cables, or handlebar shifters to get mucked up with sand. No rear gear cluster or triple ring crank that you don't need for flat beach riding. All that right there will save a bunch of weight.

 

 

 

 

 

:th:  agree 100%.  It’s a beach bike not a space shuttle. Less is more.

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OK, this project is moving along a bit more slowly than I intended. Holidays, family in town and my wife thinking I have a blowup doll out in the garage (given the time I spend there) all contributing. 

 

I did knock off two items which you may have seen in the “Lookee me...” discussion in the DIY area. Dual-purpose bike stand and ceiling storage. 

 

 

4CF1AC0E-2B38-4CC2-89B4-9545A3541A15.jpeg.f843f59e3c1315339e7b1a17598da6bd.jpeg

 

D3D42FD2-9D6C-455C-AC65-3FA083CCF07B.jpeg.b0ea66ce098c63733c4a921f45cf2f01.jpeg

 

43366269-4904-4EF6-B085-1AA9F0290375.jpeg.8a8a1608accfb8424ac1178ebcf5ae98.jpeg

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I may have mentioned that I am replacing the factory kick-stand which is a piece of crap. Same unit that Mongoose puts on all of its cheap bikes, even those below $100. It barely holds the bike up and when fully loaded with rods, raising the center of gravity, it will be useless. 

 

For that reason, the higher CoG, I decided to ditch the idea of any conventional kickstand. Research showed me the Click-Stand which is ingenious and, when a tennis ball is placed on the end tip, should work on the beach as well. 

 

Installation is innocuous, weight is negligible and it holds the bike steady, as long as you use one of the provided bungee loops to squeeze the front or rear brake to prevent motion. 

 

It uses the same concept of bungee inside light weight aluminum tubes found in foldable walking sticks and canes. Available in a range of colors, number of sections and your desired length. Delivery was quick too. 

 

ETA: I also installed a faux carbon fiber water bottle cage with the mount for the Click-Stand along side. Quite ingenious mounting option. 

 

7FE71F51-F3D1-4E9C-BC75-BD67929ADA52.jpeg.44cc05e1cada38a2119f093bed709297.jpeg

 

71C6C9B4-6A26-4CAD-8CAF-7AF803269310.jpeg.2255e0f754cd95e9a611a65131dc3de4.jpeg

 

7956896C-3C91-4E5F-87F8-660BAAF71F70.jpeg.29ad3164370fc18316c10ec8c6e14a21.jpeg

 

 

Edited by tomkaz

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BTW, the first thing done when the bike was in the repair clamp was to take off the ugly Mongoose sticker/decal using a heat gun and some adhesive remover. I left the smaller and less obnoxious “Hitch” decal in place to remind me this is not a Trek nor Specialized bike. 

 

67CABCB3-56C4-4930-89BD-60356CB78209.jpeg.4e0e0cb511e617e62c5d9e4e34e90d86.jpeg

 

 

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One other note, I replaced the factory pedals with a pair whose bearings are sealed. This model has screw-in studs for better traction with non-clip shoes (sneakers) when trail riding. As you can see, these are very aggressive and likely unnecessary for my intended usage on the beach. Most replacement pedals have some sort of stud system and I chose this model intentionally given the ease of removing the pins with an Allen wrench. My plan is to remove the studs from one side on each pedal for when I am riding the beach in bare feet. I will leave the studs on the other side should a situation arise where I might need the extra grip. 

 

EB53AE6C-3A84-4606-AD99-23DA006A9BD3.jpeg.0b977396a966cd5e274522311267658f.jpeg

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2 hours ago, tomkaz said:

I may have mentioned that I am replacing the factory kick-stand which is a piece of crap. Same unit that Mongoose puts on all of its cheap bikes, even those below $100. It barely holds the bike up and when fully loaded with rods, raising the center of gravity, it will be useless. 

 

For that reason, the higher CoG, I decided to ditch the idea of any conventional kickstand. Research showed me the Click-Stand which is ingenious and, when a tennis ball is placed on the end tip, should work on the beach as well. 

 

Installation is innocuous, weight is negligible and it holds the bike steady, as long as you use one of the provided bungee loops to squeeze the front or rear brake to prevent motion. 

 

It uses the same concept of bungee inside light weight aluminum tubes found in foldable walking sticks and canes. Available in a range of colors, number of sections and your desired length. Delivery was quick too. 

 

ETA: I also installed a faux carbon fiber water bottle cage with the mount for the Click-Stand along side. Quite ingenious mounting option. 

 

7FE71F51-F3D1-4E9C-BC75-BD67929ADA52.jpeg.44cc05e1cada38a2119f093bed709297.jpeg

 

71C6C9B4-6A26-4CAD-8CAF-7AF803269310.jpeg.2255e0f754cd95e9a611a65131dc3de4.jpeg

 

7956896C-3C91-4E5F-87F8-660BAAF71F70.jpeg.29ad3164370fc18316c10ec8c6e14a21.jpeg

 

 

Nice. I use the Clickstand as well. Works great as long as you remember to lock the brakes with those little bands it comes with. I did install an auxiliary kickstand on the rear triangle for extra support and ease of use but the Clickstand or some other solution like it is a must have.

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2 hours ago, tomkaz said:

One other note, I replaced the factory pedals with a pair whose bearings are sealed. This model has screw-in studs for better traction with non-clip shoes (sneakers) when trail riding. As you can see, these are very aggressive and likely unnecessary for my intended usage on the beach. Most replacement pedals have some sort of stud system and I chose this model intentionally given the ease of removing the pins with an Allen wrench. My plan is to remove the studs from one side on each pedal for when I am riding the beach in bare feet. I will leave the studs on the other side should a situation arise where I might need the extra grip. 

 

EB53AE6C-3A84-4606-AD99-23DA006A9BD3.jpeg.0b977396a966cd5e274522311267658f.jpeg

The studs really help when riding especially with wet boots. Good idea to remove them from one side. Just be careful when you back pedal with shorts on. Those studs will bite your shins! 

Also, I recall you mentioning you were going to change the shifters, bottom bracket and a few other things on the bike. I may have some parts available that would convert you to a 1x10 configuration which reduces complexity and removes a few lbs. PM me if you are interested in details.

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25 mins ago, beerdoh said:

The studs really help when riding especially with wet boots. Good idea to remove them from one side. Just be careful when you back pedal with shorts on. Those studs will bite your shins! 

Also, I recall you mentioning you were going to change the shifters, bottom bracket and a few other things on the bike. I may have some parts available that would convert you to a 1x10 configuration which reduces complexity and removes a few lbs. PM me if you are interested in details.

Yeah, I am sporting a couple scabs on my shins right now, learned the hard way. 

 

I appreciate the offer on the parts. I have already swapped out the shifters and cups. Not going to do anything else to the drive train for now. See how it works on our sand first. More likely to think about new tires before shifting from 7 to 10 gears (pun intended). 

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