tomkaz

Beach-fishing fat-tire bike project

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86 posts in this topic

7 hours ago, tomkaz said:

All of the following have been purchased from Amazon which makes this incredibly convenient, especially with Amazon Prime shipping. 

 

PERFORMANCE/WEIGHT UPGRADES

$16 SHIMANO Acera SL-M310 Rapid Fire Shifter (Black, 7-Speed)

$16 YST Sealed BSA cupset w/Bearings English threads

$22 FOOKER Nylon 3 Bearing Composite 9/16 Mountain Bike Pedals

$26 Ergon GP1 Grips

$9 Corki Quick Release Bicycle Seatpost Clamp 

$18 CYSKY 28.6 SeatPost 350mm Bike Seat Post 

 

GEAR CARRYING PARTS

$24 comingfit 110lb  Universal Adjustable Bike Rack

$12 YakGear Milk Crate

$12 Yak-Gear Rod Holder Extender (bought two)

 

GARAGE STORAGE - Space is tight and I have tall ceilings to going to hoist the bike up to ceiling when not in use. 

$17 2005 RAD Cycle Products Heavy Duty Bike Lift Hoist For Garage Storage 100lb Capacity 

 

TRUCK CONVEYANCE - I have an existing Thule 4-bike rack (circa 2011) that attaches to my truck’s hitch. However, it is designed for traditional street bikes that have horizontal top tubes and won’t easily accommodate the diagonal tube on MTBs or the Hitch. This rack adapter attaches to the seat post and stem creating a horizontal tube to sit on the rack’s horizontal posts. Brilliant and saved me $200+ for a fat tire bike hitch rack. 

 

$27 BV Bike Rack Adjustable Adapter Bar & Frame Cross-Bar TubeTop 

 

TOTALS

$107 Performance/weight upgrades

$48 Gear carrying

$17 Garage storage

$27 Truck transport

———————

$199 Total

 

$249 Mongoose Hitch

————————

$448 w/o bike shop labor

 

Attaching the crate to the rear rack can be done with hardware and parts I have on hand. 

 

My goal was a $500 all-in limit and it looks like it is going to be close. I doubt the bike shop can do all I am asking for $50. While I have the skills (attrofied from 30+ years ago) to do it all, I don’t have several of the bike-specific tools needed like thin metric spanners. Nor the experience calibrating disc brakes. And, no matter what, his time is still cheaper when you consider all the other factors.

Wish I would've seen this sooner. Theres a decent one made by GMC called the Yukon.

Aluminum frame and shimano parts for a little over $300. Fyi its TOUGH peddaling these things in the sand. Be prepared for pain Lol

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33 mins ago, BigFischer said:

Wish I would've seen this sooner. Theres a decent one made by GMC called the Yukon.

Aluminum frame and shimano parts for a little over $300. Fyi its TOUGH peddaling these things in the sand. Be prepared for pain Lol

I have looked at that but no one has any stock and no clue when they might get a shipment. Would have been cool since my truck is a GMC Yukon Denali XL - ha!

 

But what I could not figure out was how that bike weighs in at 44 pounds with an alloy frame and the Hitch weights the same with a steel frame. There was no weight savings there. The Shimano parts were the only advantage that I noted and at $319, that's $60 over the price of the Hitch, about what i would cost so swap out the derailleur. 

 

I have ridden on the sand and while it is different than road, it is not THAT bad if you stick to the more compacted sand near high water line and get your tire pressure down to 7psi or so. 

 

Lastly, there are very few, if any discussions, about the GMC on any of the bike forums which is where I found soooo much info about the WalGoose. 

 

Thanks for the thought. 

 

 

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Picked it up tonight at Wally World. Not too thrilled with the box seeming to have been opened but everything looks good inside. All the bits where they should be, all the factory zip ties in place and all the packing material where it belongs.

 

Note, 20.37 kg, net weight, is 45 pounds. 

 

Photos in the box. I do see a wear mark on the seat clamp that got through the paint but I don't care since I am having that removed right away. 

 

The welds don't look too bad for this price point, do they? (Question for those of you who do know something about welding)

fullsizeoutput_3453.jpeg.c012a1d4fd05db75dcb58bb9ddae0ae7.jpeg

 

fullsizeoutput_345d.jpeg.7212d64b8bbb39926f6b42e0bc17b35a.jpeg

 

fullsizeoutput_345e.jpeg.0ed8deebc410ffbad6a6a810bf2cd189.jpeg

 

fullsizeoutput_345f.jpeg.8ed86508ed197abddd64c14ec8cb9228.jpeg

 

 

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BTW, just to confirm, the Hitch is not 5-6 pound lighter than the Dolomite just because of the drilled out rims. As noted on a bike forum post about the Hitch (aka Malus):

 

First, lets get one thing out of the way. The Hitch (or Malus) is in no way just a Dolomite with hole punched rims. I had that misconception until I actually saw it. It is lighter than a Dolomite due to smaller & tapered seat stays, chain stays & slimmed & tapered fork. 

 

Unfortunately, the guy goes on to note that the tire clearances are tighter on the Hitch making an upgrade to 48" tires a bit tricky. I will worry about that when I need to, if ever. 

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9 hours ago, tomkaz said:

BTW, just to confirm, the Hitch is not 5-6 pound lighter than the Dolomite just because of the drilled out rims. As noted on a bike forum post about the Hitch (aka Malus):

 

First, lets get one thing out of the way. The Hitch (or Malus) is in no way just a Dolomite with hole punched rims. I had that misconception until I actually saw it. It is lighter than a Dolomite due to smaller & tapered seat stays, chain stays & slimmed & tapered fork. 

 

Unfortunately, the guy goes on to note that the tire clearances are tighter on the Hitch making an upgrade to 48" tires a bit tricky. I will worry about that when I need to, if ever. 

Tomkaz, the welds look fine. That bike will do the trick. 

One more thing you should buy is an Accu-Gauge “low pressure tire gauge”. Standard tire gauges are not sensitive enough to give accurate readings in the 4-15 PSI range. Make sure you specify the valve type (presa or schrader) when you order. 

For actual riding, things most people forget to bring with them are: spare tube, high volume frame pump, tire levers, cycling multi-tool. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had to repair flats for other people who were unprepared. 

And don’t forget a hydration pack. You can put your tools and snacks inside!

07897DC0-9F5C-4D51-B64B-BC6D432409DB.jpeg

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22 hours ago, tomkaz said:

Agreed on both fronts. The difference between the $199 Dolomite and the $249, while both have alloy rims, those on the the Hitch are drilled-out which will save some weight. Both models come with disc brakes from the factory so the rotors and frames will allow for brake upgrades. I found two guys who have added better stopping hydraulic brakes to their Hitches.

 

And, if I do end up using this bike quite a bit, I can then upgrade to something a bit more upscale. Time will tell. And if I go that route, I either keep the Hitch for one of my sons to ride when they are home or just sell it as assembled to another local angler looking to do the same, but not wanting to take on the project themselves. 

 

Dolomite

 

91gEELfSWkL._SX425_.jpg

 

 

Hitch

 

4cbc9324-14b5-474d-ae13-3f00daa37c35_1.d

nice:)

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15 hours ago, RobVB said:

For what it's worth, here's my setup:

20180630_090942.jpg

 

 

I have the same cart but only find the need for that much gear during shark season, which begins right about now. The adapter is $80 and on my wish list if I can’t 

McGiver one myself. 

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15 hours ago, beerdoh said:

Tomkaz, the welds look fine. That bike will do the trick. 

One more thing you should buy is an Accu-Gauge “low pressure tire gauge”. Standard tire gauges are not sensitive enough to give accurate readings in the 4-15 PSI range. Make sure you specify the valve type (presa or schrader) when you order. 

For actual riding, things most people forget to bring with them are: spare tube, high volume frame pump, tire levers, cycling multi-tool. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had to repair flats for other people who were unprepared. 

And don’t forget a hydration pack. You can put your tools and snacks inside!

07897DC0-9F5C-4D51-B64B-BC6D432409DB.jpeg

 

 

Geez, like you can see into my Amazon wish list related to bikes. Understand all of it, just hope to not have flats with those nasty ~25TPI tires. 

 

Schrader for sure in this price range. 

 

Any recommendations on double action or high high volume frame pumps? 

Edited by tomkaz
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15 hours ago, tomkaz said:

 

 

Geez, like you can see into my Amazon wish list related to bikes. Understand all of it, just hope to not have flats with those nasty ~25TPI tires. 

 

Schrader for sure in this price range. 

 

Any recommendations on double action or high high volume frame pumps? 

I carry a Lezyne HV Drive Pump. You definitely don’t want to have to remove a 25 TPI tire in the field. Only way to get them unseated is to lay the wheel down and walk on the sidewalk.  To avoid that you can put some Stan’s tire sealant in the tube. You can squirt it right into the valve. Just remove the valve core first. 6 oz per wheel should do it. It adds weight but worth it IMHO. Those big tires seem to find every thorn and pokey thing on the trail. 

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Had similar thoughts before, it isn’t worth it. Riding in soft sand is a tough go as it is no matter how fancy the bike is. And then you have another maintenance project on your hands on top of all of your reels, gear, etc. Better to hoof it.

 

I don’t mean to be a buzz kill, it’s just my 2 cents.

Edited by Shane_O
Don’t want to discourage innovation
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12 hours ago, Shane_O said:

Had similar thoughts before, it isn’t worth it. Riding in soft sand is a tough go as it is no matter how fancy the bike is. And then you have another maintenance project on your hands on top of all of your reels, gear, etc. Better to hoof it.

 

I don’t mean to be a buzz kill, it’s just my 2 cents.

I disagree but of course it depends on the beach and your level of fitness. Soft sand is a tough go for sure. I've ridden the Nauset beach road out past Pochet island and that type of loose, deep sand is to be avoided unless you are super fit. Nauset beach itself however is easy riding as are most beaches in MA and RI. 

Regarding maintenance, regular beach riding isn't really such a big deal if you keep things relatively clean and well lubed. All you need to do is rinse the sand and salt off with a low pressure hose after every ride using a stiff brush once in a while on the cogs and chain. Grab the chain with a rag and pedal backwards to get off any surface sand and re-lube with a dry lube.

I ride bikes in all conditions and do a lot of mountain/fat biking off road with stream crossings, mud, road salt and snow.  These bike are a lot more durable than people think. Below is my off-road bike after a typical winter ride. The drive-train is caked with mud and debris. In those conditions a yearly overhaul is necessary but in between all I do is rinse the bike if it's not too cold and re-lube (with a heavy lube) as necessary.I change the chain once per year to reduce wear on the cogs but otherwise just clean things as best I can between rides...

IMG_3112.JPG

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@beerdoh - Great feedback and advice and consistent with what I am thinking. 

 

Should I have the bike shop apply Frame Saver before he assembles? The Walgoose frame is steel so an internal rust film could minimize internal rust out.  

 

However, the guy has never heard of Frame Saver or boiled linseed oil application and I worry that he won’t know enough to protect threads, seat stem tube, etc. is it worth it if I generally take good care of my gear? 

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the mongoose goes pretty well on sand.
you might think about putting a motor on it ;-)
my mongoose will go about 25mph for about an hour on a charge. 
and if i run out of juice, it pedals just fine
 

2014081095102447.jpg

2014081095102609.jpg

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