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Big Will

Tuna jigging questions

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6 hours ago, ksong said:

Lou T

 

the jig you show is knock-off of FCL Labo SL jigs. It is not good idea to show cheap copy here.

 

fclsl.jpg

Kil I know, I was with Carl N. the day we called you from Hatteras NC, he borrowed my cell phone to tell we where standing in the parking lot with Jay, and he had a hole truck load of the Tono jigs that he was selling for $12...dollars. That was some time ago and at the time we could not tell the difference between the Tono jig or the FCL Labo SL jigs. What we found out on that trip is the Blue fin tuna did not either. Then a couple days later those fish did not care what jig you put in the water. We had six men in the boat and they ate everything. Every type of jig and every color from light to dark. My favorite is the silver prism foil that has the little glow dots on the belly. Don't know why but its my go to...;)

 

What come first the Tono or the FCL Labo jigs.

Lou T

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35 mins ago, blacklabnh said:

 

I bought multiples of every size CM hammered diamond jigs probably 10 years ago (along with the squid skirt bucktails) and have caught on many fish on them from sea bass and tuna to golden tile and snowy grouper. Great stuff. 

I have one friend that, that's all he ever carried was the CM Hammered jig, the one that had the single hook attached to the swivel

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10 mins ago, Lou T said:

Kil I know, I was with Carl N. the day we called you from Hatteras NC, he borrowed my cell phone to tell we where standing in the parking lot with Jay, and he had a hole truck load of the Tono jigs that he was selling for $12...dollars. That was some time ago and at the time we could not tell the difference between the Tono jig or the FCL Labo SL jigs. What we found out on that trip is the Blue fin tuna did not either. Then a couple days later those fish did not care what jig you put in the water. We had six men in the boat and they ate everything. Every type of jig and every color from light to dark. My favorite is the silver prism foil that has the little glow dots on the belly. Don't know why but its my go to...;)

 

What come first the Tono or the FCL Labo jigs.

Lou T

I am concentrating on making rods as guys who sell knock-off jigs and poppers are flourishing and guys who sell authentic jigs and poppers are struggling . :)

But there are anglers who use only authentic jigs and poppers.

FCL Labo changed the colors with spotted glow.  It seems it makes difference. 

$20 difference is nothing for tuna fishing if it makes even slight difference 

 

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2 hours ago, Lou T said:

I have one friend that, that's all he ever carried was the CM Hammered jig, the one that had the single hook attached to the swivel

I have one of those. Really good quality jig. I really like it. I prefer the assist hooks for jigging for anything though. I feel like with the big single hooks it's easier to lose fish when it gets leverage on the hook. Maybe I'm wrong though. I dont see how the expensive jigs would make a difference, I guess someone would have to explain it to me. I'm still trying to learn the whole slow pitch, flat fall jig thing. 

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9 hours ago, ksong said:

Tuna jigging has been around for long. But we had momentum when there were great bluefin jigging bites near Bacardi in 1989 (?).

They used cod jigs like big diamond jigs or Viking jigs then and caught big bluefin with them.  

I think the event was a starting point of popularity of tuna jigging on the East Coast though there were hard code tuna jig fishermen before then. 

 

We soon discovered smaller and center balanced jigs work better for tuna like diamond jigs or other smaller jigs. It is no wonder West Coast guys now use slow pitch jigs to catch tuna as they are good sizes jigs for tuna.

 

There is no secret for tuna jigging. Technique is not important as long as you are ready for jigging long hours non-stop in right depth.

We used to jig for 12 hours nonstop on party boats no matter what other bait fishermen do.  Don't give up jigging even bait fishermen catch tuna left and right.  Tuna don't hit jigs all the time, but eventually they hit jigs.  

Right depth is important in Canyon fishing. When you don't know exact depth, 100' - 150' is usually prime zone. 

When you fish inshore lumps, they usually stay near the bottom and you jig near the bottom accordingly. 

 

We used to use long 8' rod to cast upcurrent like cod jigging. 

Nowadays, short and light jigging rods gain popularity.

 

There are two major technique. 

One is to move rod up and down in desirable depth.

This technique is proven on the East Coast. 

It imitates injured bait fish.

 

The other technique is Japanese jigging style to crank fast.

It works too.  

But it is not easy to use Japanese style jigging for long hours non-stop.

 

Many anglers claim match the hatch for jigging. But I observed that good tuna jigs like Sevenseas Hooker jigs or FCL Labo SL jigs in 200g - 250g works every where. 

 

I prefer 80 lb braid and 80 lb fluoro carbon leader line to tuna jigging in canyons on party boats because of crowded situation.  I usually give 25 lb drag and can land 50 -60 lb tuna within 5 minutes and 100 lb within 10 minutes.

Tuna party boats on the East Coast didn't allow braid lines, but thanks to Mike Jung of Peace Token Tackle, they allowed braid line for jig fishermen as they observed Miks's success using color coded Japanese braid line. 

 

To jig long hours, rods and reels have to be light. 

I found JM PE reels are the best for tuna jigging. 

 

Tuna rarely bite day and night. 

Especially on the West Coast, they rarely hit on jigs daytime. 

But they hit jigs daytime when you fish inshore lumps and NC water.

For canyons, it depends on water temperature when they hit jigs on daytime or night time. 

 

My experience is limited. I suggest to find your way of tuna jigging by experimentation. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you! Awesome information right there. You seem to have included most of what I want to know into one post. I fished two trips in early November and it seemed like during the early day the fish kept biting. There was a few hits at grey light then it was spread out. I hooked a fish at around 9am on a butterfish but broke the line because I had too much line out on a small reel so instead of the under 20lb I had at strike with all the line out it was probably alot more. Using light line so it popped right at the swivel. Someone hooked a big bluefin or bigeye on a jig at around 11 but it took him around the boat 3 times and finally lost it. Maybe late season they're more likely to bite during the day as you said. So I'm guessing I should focus at jigging during grey light and sunset and bait during day and night? Or just keep jigging? 

Edited by Big Will

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