ferret

Fly glueing

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So I've been out of the game for a while, and I'm watching youtube videos and noticed in several videos the tier is UV gluing much of the feathers.  Is this fly gluing the new trend?  BTW, I'm not knocking it, just curious.

 

Starting at like 8-9 minutes 

 

 

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It’s definirey a newer trend...seems to be everyone’s favorite thing right now, and it surely does have applications. There are a number of different acrylics available, most are UV cured and some are blue light cured (allegedly the safer option), requiring their respective light source to cure. There are also a ton of different condaistencies available, from flexible sort of like silicone to super hard, just depends on what you wanna tie I guess. 

 

Most are sort of like an alternate to epoxy, but do not yellow over time, but it is a bit more expensive to constantly buy the goop, but you do save time as they cure when exposed to their associated light and aren’t time curing like epoxy. 

 

I didnt watxh those videos admittedly, but if they’re just flying the feathers in instead of tying and then applying the acrylic, I don’t know if I’d do that as I want my materials to be bonded with thread and then cured for additional protection/a certain look. 

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Pete Gray is the master at this technique.  He calls it Phly Welding.  If you can take your eyes away from the damascus steel jaws of his JLaw vise long enough to look at the flie it is holding, you'll see some amazing work. He's been doing it for maybe 2 years now.

 

 

You could even pull a search here on SOL and get some of his work.  

Edited by M. saxatilis

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That's the first time I've seen that technique.   Makes sense.  Cuts down the bulk of the head, easier to control the placement of the feathers.  I'll have to give it a shot.

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I like to tie in Production format, I never make less than three at one time but more often than not 6 or 12 at one time.

 

I usually start with the tail and flash all at one time for the number of flies I want before the next step, I find this  gives me better uniformity and in the end tying time is cut way down.

 

With regards to cementing the fly, I still use head cement at the completion of each step that needs cementing and then each fly goes into a drying wheel. I find this process makes a more durable fly and the cement penetrates better and by the time I get to fly 12, the cement on fly 1 is dry to start the next step. Using head cement is cheaper so when I start my next step the thread bonds much better than it would on a UV  coating which is very hard. UV cement is not cheap and I only use it on the head when I finish the fly.

 

I also stopped using flat waxed nylon thread and switched to Ultra Thread 210 dineer to get a better bond with the cement and UV cement. I found the waxed cement would prevent the cements from penetrating well.

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I've been using the UV light to tack weld the mono lanyards to the 3D eye assembly for years for my Squid-Cycle Fly as a first step.

It's much easier keeping them in the right position without them rolling when you use the 5 min. epoxy only.

There can be a slight problem using only 5 min. epoxy doing this assemble. You need to let it cure for a few minutes. The mixture of epoxy seems to eat into the adhesive backs on the 3D eyes if you use it too early. The eyes will roll in all different direction before it ever hardens. To solve this problem, I tack weld it first using the light, than cover the complete eye with the five minute that's the bond that holds it. The UV light stuff is really not an adhesive mixture but a bonding agent. It will en-capsule just fine, but a strong bond will not.  

Materials, Step 1with dim. added.jpg

Step 4.JPG

Step 5.JPG

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What are the effects of long term exposure to the UV on finger tips and eyes? Is there any risk?

 

We try to protect ourselves out side, sometimes, should precautions be taken here, with this type of product?

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