patabate

Should manufacturers mark weight on leadheads?

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Most of the time I will take a lead head and just bounce it in my hand and estimate it's weight to determine if it can be used in the area that I am fishing... 

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20 hours ago, fishless said:

About the only thing I can accurately guesstimate the weight of is 12 oz in a container.  For everything else I weigh and group together in plano boxes. 

 

Easily confused by tall boys. ^^^ 

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1 hour ago, SC said:

Why not use the numbered punches to label 1 mold instead of 200 plus jigs?

I didn’t want to hammer the piss out my molds .. I guess it could be dremelled in .. I didn’t nor don’t really care abaout marking them anyways .. 

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1 hour ago, SC said:

Why not use the numbered punches to label 1 mold instead of 200 plus jigs?

Read what Angler #1 posted.  In addition different size hooks and tying materials will change the weight of a lure.  If a lure is made in tin, which I often do, the weight changes by 33% making the marks in the mold useless.  Even coatings like powder paint add to the equation.  

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12 hours ago, MaxKatt said:

Yes, but only if they put metric weights on the opposing side of the head.

 

And etch the hook size on the line tie

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17 mins ago, scoobydoo said:

And etch the hook size on the line tie

 

:)  I kinda agree w/ OP.  None of my plugs have great re-sale value because I always told myself I only buy to fish.  Thus, I'd write the weights on everything, remove the hook covers, and put them in Plano boxes.  I did this to guard against becoming a collector.   I do have some unrigged with no weights written on them, but they are for sincere future use.  No collecting here.  

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Angler#1, yes, there are variables that affect the actual weight. certainly, if the mold maker designs the jig head to be for example, 1 ounce, anything added to the jig increases the weight. Painting & tying hair on a jig head doesn't sound like it would add much weight, and it doesn't, but the hair, thread, coating on the threads if used, they all add a little weight. So now that 1 ounce bare jig weighs more than 1 ounce.

 

I just mailed a padded envelope today, weighed it before I sealed it & it weighed 3 ounces. I weighed it again after sealing it up with tape & it weighed 3.5 ounces. I didn't think the tape would add much weight, but a half ounce is noticeable. Same with that 1 ounce jig. By the time it's complete, it now weighs a noticeable amount more. 

 

Mold makers can't predict how every jig poured from their molds will be used or dressed, so even if they make molds with cavities that produce accurate weights, there are too many other possible variables that can change the resulting weight. 

 

I have two scales, one being a jewelers scale so I can weigh small items in ounces, grams & grains. I find that sometimes smaller jig heads are close in weight, but not to the point of precise. So, I take an average weight by weighing 100 jigs. IMO, that's as accurate as I need them to be. 

 

On larger jigs, yes, it seems they can be all over the place. Again, too many variables, and one being the actual mold. On a large mold cavity, if the cavity is 1/100" off the weight of the resulting jig will be off greatly since we use dense metals like lead. I have a couple of Do It molds, that pour similar style heads. I noticed that a specific weight jig in the one mold, didn't match the same weight in a different mold when the two are poured & compared. I don't know why that is, it is what it is. Short of actually weighing every jig, the only reference I have is what is on the mold. I first noticed the size, as one mold was producing noticeably larger heads than the other.

 

That was one reason I bought the jewelers scale, to check weights of smaller jigs that I poured. My other scale weighs up to 55 lbs, and will weigh in 1/10 ounce increments. That's plenty accurate for large jigs, doesn't give accurate weighs on tiny jigs. I pour some 1/100 & 1/80 ounce jigs and on the big scale, they all weigh nothing or 1/10 ounce. So, even the degree of accuracy in a scale used might cause a noticeable variance in weights depending on how accurate a mold maker wants to be.

 

I also tend to clean up the jigs I pour as good as I can, removing "flash" and excess lead from the pour, but even then there can be differences in the end result as they don't all pour exactly the same. On those tiny jigs, it's very difficult to tell, even by weight the difference between a 1/100 and a 1/80 ounce jig depending on how clean the pour may be. The same could be said of large size jigs. A small ridge of pouring flash around the jig can add a lot of extra weight. 

 

If you pour & tie your own jigs, you can mark them in various ways as has been mentioned here. IMO, that's the best you'll get. However, unless you weigh each one, you don't know how accurate that weight may be. It has also been noted that there could be legal ramifications by indicating a weight on the jig, and not being accurate. I don't know why anyone would take it that far, but in today's world, who knows.  With no marking on the jig, an inaccuracy in advertised weight could be called a clerical error, so perhaps another reason mold or lure makers aren't jumping on marking weights on jigs. No one wants to get sued or provide the ammunition to do so. 

 

For any dressed jigs, where you're tying on a dressing, using different color threads could be done to identify a weight. Like use red for 1 ounce, black for two, etc. If pouring your own jigs, then marking the mold can be done. 

 

I wouldn't however, expect many commercial mold or jig makers to be too concerned about being accurate with weights or marking the jigs as such. I see the point here, but there's always other perspectives. 

Edited by tidewaterfly

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59 mins ago, Dan Tinman said:

Read what Angler #1 posted.  In addition different size hooks and tying materials will change the weight of a lure.  If a lure is made in tin, which I often do, the weight changes by 33% making the marks in the mold useless.  Even coatings like powder paint add to the equation.  

No different that when old metal squid makers used to list the weight of the squid but that weight represented pure tin, just in reverse. Anyone would know that a 2 oz pure tin squid would weigh differently with substituted materials, hooks, dressing, paint, etc but may be helpful in being able to differentiate between different sizes of the same model. 

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4 mins ago, SC said:

No different that when old metal squid makers used to list the weight of the squid but that weight represented pure tin, just in reverse. Anyone would know that a 2 oz pure tin squid would weigh differently with substituted materials, hooks, dressing, paint, etc but may be helpful in being able to differentiate between different sizes of the same model. 

Tin weighs almost exactly 2/3 of what lead weighs.  A 2 oz tin squid would weigh 3 oz in lead.

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Another consideration on this fascinating subject: 

 

A jig tyed with hair will have more mass and will weigh more  (than the bare jig) on the scale in your kitchen or workshop. Once it enters the water the mass will remain the same, however it will weigh less (than the bare jig) due to the buoyancy of the hair. In addition, the hair greatly increases surface area, creating drag, further reducing the sink rate. These effects can be rather signicant. It doesnt take much deer hair to float a hook, enough hair will even float a light metal jig. 

 

Any additions or dressing of the jig will have an impact on the sink rate. As an extreme example, imagine casting out a bucktail  dressed with a chunk of styrofoam. 

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This problem was exactly one of the issues I was trying to solve when I machined my own fluke bucktail mold, that doubles for tog jigs. I have 3/4, 1, 1 1/2, and 2, and you can instantly tell which is which. For the boat jigging I do not believe the shape differences make much difference, after all, half the time the fluke goes for the teaser grub, right? And for tog, it matters not at all.

 

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Here's a swinghook version with 2 squidskirts. Can you tell it's weight?

 

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I would like to see the jigs labeled because it would be nice to know if the jig is 3/8 or 1/2 oz. etc.  it’s all just an estimate.  Accuracy in labeling is not important.  What’s important is the jig holding to the designated depth.  I started to mark my jigs with dots that represent the stated weight using a sharpie.

3/8 oz. Three small dots

1/2 oz. four small dots

3/4 oz.  three larger dots 

the larger size of jigs get one dot for each oz.

they do need to be touched up at times but it works for me, and I try to mark on the bottom of the jig.

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