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isleomaniac

identify this insect

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Hi

 

Its a woolly ash aphid or similar  , adult winged stage. Caddis and sedge flies are both the same ,  interchangeable names ,order Trichoptera (hairy winged flies). The name caddis refers to the case building larvae and harks back to caddymen ,pedlars who pinned their wares to their clothing, The term Caddy ,as in golf , comes from the same origin. Some Trichopterans do not build cases , they spin a net instead  and use that to capture food

 

Jim

 

Woolly Ash Aphid

 

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You would never know that I took at least one entomology course in college?  So i dug out my bug book, and had I looked before, I would have found it in the first of the color plates.  I didn't expect to see aphids on the water, so these tiny aphids most likely flew out of the trees and landed on the water.  Probably from the willows along the ponds edge, other than that, there are pines, oaks, and tupelos, along with some shrubs such as blueberry, and sweet pepper bush.  But there are many species of trees that are hosts for aphids.  The next time I see aphids on the water, I will give the trees a closer inspection.  There were also midges hatching that day, and on the water along with the tiny aphids.  I have fished many midge hatches, and so I am quite familiar with these.  The white cottony threads on the body are secreted from wax glands.

Edited by isleomaniac
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On 12/6/2018 at 10:11 AM, Highlandsaltyfly said:

Hi

 

Its a woolly ash aphid or similar  , adult winged stage. Caddis and sedge flies are both the same ,  interchangeable names ,order Trichoptera (hairy winged flies). The name caddis refers to the case building larvae and harks back to caddymen ,pedlars who pinned their wares to their clothing, The term Caddy ,as in golf , comes from the same origin. Some Trichopterans do not build cases , they spin a net instead  and use that to capture food

 

Jim

 

Woolly Ash Aphid

 

Great catch/ID. Looks like it's the Water Lily Aphid.

 

"In spring the water lily aphid feeds on various Prunus species (such as Prunus spinosa) where it feeds on leaf petioles and fruit stalks curling the leaves. In early summer Rhopalosiphum nymphaeae alatae migrate to the secondary hosts comprising a large variety of water plants, including Nymphaea (water lilies), Potamogeton (pondweeds), and Sparganium(arrowheads). Its distribution is almost cosmopolitan..."

 

Rhopalosiphum_nymphaeae_alate_Plumpton_c2015-04-15_18-19-11ew.jpg.dc4a7ad7b0fad9a6e07e3e81da352b71.jpg

 

21 hours ago, isleomaniac said:

You would never know that I took at least one entomology course in college?  So i dug out my bug book, and had I looked before, I would have found it in the first of the color plates.  I didn't expect to see aphids on the water, so these tiny aphids most likely flew out of the trees and landed on the water.  Probably from the willows along the ponds edge, other than that, there are pines, oaks, and tupelos, along with some shrubs such as blueberry, and sweet pepper bush.  But there are many species of trees that are hosts for aphids.  The next time I see aphids on the water, I will give the trees a closer inspection.  There were also midges hatching that day, and on the water along with the tiny aphids.  I have fished many midge hatches, and so I am quite familiar with these.  The white cottony threads on the body are secreted from wax glands.

I had a semester of aquatic entomology but couldn't ID it offhand. Which got me thinking it wasn't actually aquatic...

 

 

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Hi

 

As a biologist I spend quite a chunk of my time with sea trout (sea run browns). I have watched on a number of occasions sea trout post smolts in the sea feeding on wind blown insects coming off stands of pine and birch. So even in the sea they never forget the goodies they enjoyed in freshwater. Food is food!

Jim

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Never heard of aphids on the water before, but they are practically everywhere so it makes sense some will end up being eaten by trout and probably misidentified by anglers who see them.

JC

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I am closing in on woolly alder aphid which has a bluish head.  We have smooth alder shrubs growing around the edges of ponds, and the aphids alternate between alder and maple trees.  When colder weather happens as in November, a winged generation is produced. 

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