JimJ

Conventional rod reel seats

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I don’t understand why the reel seat on conventional rods have the threaded end in front of the reel. The threads are where my left hand is placed to thumb the line back and forth.  The rod would be more comfortable if the smooth fore grip of cork or cork tape was directly in front of the reel. When I first started chunking with a conventional reel I used a heavy action spinning rod where the threads are behind the reel and I think that is the better set up.  I think I am going to try the temporary wrap used on tennis rackets over the threads on my conventional rods.  Anybody know what the reason is for the reel seats on conventional casting rods having threads in front of the reel?  

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Way back in the dark ages and brass reel seats, the threaded portion was below the reel.

 

Some of the builders that cast conventionals a lot reversed the reel seat so the threads would not impair the casting hand below the reel.   Meaning a smooth surface for the fingers to wrap around when casting and thumbing the spool.

 

I just place my hand above the reel seat if it is reversed on a conventional rod, have no problem laying the line.

 

It more or less depends on what hand you want to not have thread contact.

 

So, have a rod built your way or build it yourself.    That is what custom is all about.

 

On my heavy jigging rods, with conventional reel, the threads are above the reel and my foregrips are around 11 to 12 inches long.   Makes jigging easier.   And the rod is easier to hold and control with a heavy fish on.

Edited by Silverado

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5 hours ago, JimJ said:

I don’t understand why the reel seat on conventional rods have the threaded end in front of the reel. The threads are where my left hand is placed to thumb the line back and forth.  The rod would be more comfortable if the smooth fore grip of cork or cork tape was directly in front of the reel. When I first started chunking with a conventional reel I used a heavy action spinning rod where the threads are behind the reel and I think that is the better set up.  I think I am going to try the temporary wrap used on tennis rackets over the threads on my conventional rods.  Anybody know what the reason is for the reel seats on conventional casting rods having threads in front of the reel?  

that's the diff between casting rods and spinning rods.

HH

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Thanks Silverado.  What you say makes a lot of sense. I notice on the old rods with brass seats the nut is thick and bulky and would be annoying during casting if under the back of the reel.  So builders mounted the seat so the nut would be under the front of the reel.  The nut was far enough under the front of the reel so the hand laying the line was only on the threads. The threads on the old brass and stainless steel seats were also fine and not as course as the threads are on the modern plastic seats so they were barely noticeable. But the nut on the modern plastic seats have a smooth thinner profile so I don’t even notice that it’s there when I use a heavy spinning rod with a conventional reel. My hands are on the small side and my reels (980 and 990) are wide so I need to have the hand laying the line close to the reel. It’s not a big deal to me but I might try some tape or tennis racket grip. 

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Aesthetics aside, most people use a conventional reel with their left hand. Having a downlocking reel seat means that the force of your hand keeps twisting the locking nut tighter on the reel stem. 

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Yea building your own gives you more options.    The rod below is a boat rod I made for medium weight jigs, 6 to 8 ounces.    Made it a long time ago, I now put on a longer foregrip.    When bouncing jigs near the bottom out of a boat my hand is up against the reel so I can keep the thumb on the spool.   If the reel seat were mounted threads down it would become uncomfortable after a period of time.

 

Ignore the plugs, this was a staged photo to show the plugs.    This is a 8 foot jigging rod, useless for casting plugs.

 

spWTF0Y.jpg

 

 

Edited by Silverado

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This photo is to show the privileges of the rod builder:   Put the reel seat on any way you want and make the grips any length you want.    This rod is a 8 foot boat jigging rod, rated at 50 pounds.   For Pacific Halibut jigging in the Straits of Juan de Fuca.  I will mount a Penn high speed Jigmaster on it with 60 pound braid.   This Jigmaster is modified with Newell components and T-100 drags.  Foregrip is 11 inches long.  Grips are large diameter for wresting with those big Halibut.

 

Why the short rear grip?    When a fish is on the butt will be stuck in a belt type rod holder:   A longer grip just gets in the way.

 

This one is in progress now, when I finish the wrap the next project is a Rainshadow 1569 wrapped conventional.  Reel to be a Penn 990.   It will be a chunking rod for big baits and sinkers.

 

eegMMzT.jpg

Edited by Silverado

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5 hours ago, bayyaker54 said:

Also, don’t a lot of factory rods have a trigger grip for the four finger. Which is on the bottom of the reel seat

Yes, triggers:   I have a box full of trigger seats, they will be used on future builds for Salmon Mooching Rods.  9 footers with a bait feeding conventional.

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9 hours ago, JimJ said:

Thanks Silverado.  What you say makes a lot of sense. I notice on the old rods with brass seats the nut is thick and bulky and would be annoying during casting if under the back of the reel.  So builders mounted the seat so the nut would be under the front of the reel.  The nut was far enough under the front of the reel so the hand laying the line was only on the threads. The threads on the old brass and stainless steel seats were also fine and not as course as the threads are on the modern plastic seats so they were barely noticeable. But the nut on the modern plastic seats have a smooth thinner profile so I don’t even notice that it’s there when I use a heavy spinning rod with a conventional reel. My hands are on the small side and my reels (980 and 990) are wide so I need to have the hand laying the line close to the reel. It’s not a big deal to me but I might try some tape or tennis racket grip. 

 

Tell me about your 990.    I have one on the way now (From Japan of all places!!) and it will go on my future build 1569 blank.   I plan on putting a knurled knob on the Mag Adjust.   Maybe a handle upgrade.

Edited by Silverado

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I bought on the BST forum last year to fish for brown sharks on south jersey beaches. Bought it from a guy in Idaho that used it for sturgeon. I bought it on a whim when the guy selling it was getting low ball offers, I felt I had a use for it, and I gave him what he was asking -something around $80.  It is mint and all original. I caught a couple of 4-5’ sharks and a Ray on it last year.  I found that it is bigger, heavier and more than I need for the sharks I catch.  But it’s an absolute beast.  It is a little harder a cast with my smaller hands and my thumb sometimes slips off the back of the spool.  I find that the 980 with 20 # mono is perfect for my needs.  I have 3 of those, one that I bought in the early1980s when they first came out and 2 in mint condition that I bought on the BST forum as spares.  I think that line is the best Penn surf conventional reels they made, especially for bait fishing where weight doesn’t matter much.  Good luck with yours.  Yeah one of the weaknesses is that the mag is hard to adjust. A dime works if you don’t have a screwdriver.  I’ve used a snap on a snap swivel and a fishhook in a pinch too.  

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Thanks Jim.   Like most fishermen I really do not need another reel but I have admired the 970, 980,  and 990 reels for a long time.   

 

Funny where they show up:   Yours in Idaho, mine in Japan.    

 

I plan on using mine with the 1569 shore fishing for Halibut.    Maybe 30 pound mono with a 60 pound top shot.    I think the knob on the mag adjust will help.  

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