Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
streamerchucker

Hollow tube fly

Rate this topic

7 posts in this topic

I've used Hollow collars on tubes for intruder-esque patterns for targeting King Salmon with great success.  As an avid tube tier, I would say it all depends upon how you seat the hook within the tube.  Junction tubing, you should not experience any more fouling than usual when fishing a Hollow Fleye tied on a hook.  If you attached your hook to line with a perfection loop, then cinched the line into the junction tubing so the knot sits in the tube with the hook free-swinging, then yeah, I'd say it is very likely to foul.  You may not notice it as much if you use a smaller hook.

 

Good looking tie there.      

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice hollow, @streamerchucker! I would like to tie a few of these on tubes or segmented tubes once I get the proper gear/materials.

 

I just tied my first tube fly, a simple olive over white sand eel pattern with white saddle hackles for a tail. I was given a larger, flexible tube to place over the tube the fly was tied on and to insert the eye of the hook. I have never fished a tube fly for stripers or any other fish.

 

Is it typical to just insert the knot into the tube the fly was tied on and let the hook dangle or to use the larger tube for securing the hook eye?

 

The picture shows the fly before trimming & melting the tube on the front.

jOgW3xmn72yTrTwJGOI_xqlJ2eacdDB8_4Oofb6D

Edited by ginclear

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was gonna use a larger tube on the back to put the hook eye in. This is one of my first tube flies and I haven’t used them before. I was thinking about using tubes to save some money on stainless hooks.When I finished the fly It just looked like the hook may be a problem when it was that far back. I am gonna tie a couple dozen on tubes so I didn’t wanna waste my good bucktail on something that may not work properly. I like the sand eel I will have to make some of those as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, ginclear said:

 

Is it typical to just insert the knot into the tube the fly was tied on and let the hook dangle or to use the larger tube for securing the hook eye?

 

GinClear,

 

As you can imagine there are a number of ways to rig tube flies.  To answer your question I'm not sure it is typical per se, but it is not uncommon either.  I will use the method you describe but I don't just use a single tube when I do.  I will use two tubes of the same length, one that fits firmly inside the other.  I'll apply a dribble of glu on the outside of the smaller diameter tube, then push it into the larger tube making sure to leave approx 1/8" - 1/4" of the smaller tube sticking out the front.  Set aside to dry.  Rigging the two tube this way does two things for me - it allows a bit of the inside tube to protrude out the front making it easier to place cones/beads/ whatever before melting.  But it also provides a stop on the other end against which the knot will rest when pulled snugly into the tube.  (PIcture worth a thousand words - below)  Although this way works fine, there are much more sophisticated methods for securing the hook to the tube than this.  Where this comes into it's own is when you have an outside diameter tube that is soft and thread tension when tying the fly may close off the inside diameter and prevent your tippet/leader from threading all the way through.  This is a very important point to consider when purchasing your materials - most people getting into it think you can use aquarium tubing to tie flies- although you can, the properties of the tube will vary when in use in different temperature waters.  FOr example, I've had tubes fall apart when taken to warm tropical climates because the tubing became supple when left on the boat in the direct sunlight or around the cabana for several days.  There is nothing more frustrating than tying a beautiful tube fly then not being able to remove it from the mandrel because tying and thread tension was over applied.       

 

Tube flies are tied on a variety of "tubes", from metal tubes like the Shumakov, to plastics like HMH and ProSport Fisher.  If you want a really good internet primer on tube flies and their rigging styles I encourage you to check out an article on Global Flyfisher website.  Use "Global Fly Fisher Tube Style Plate" as your search words and it will be returned atop the list.    

 

I've always had a soft spot in my heart for tube flies.  As far as segmented flies go - I guess you are talking about many smaller tube flies put on the leader or tipper to make a larger fly?  THis works, to a point and I encourage you to try it out.  In this vein here is another great tip - rather than tying up many of the same fly, but in different weights (cones or heads). Simply put a head on a small bit of tube and have a compartment full of head sizes, colors, and shapes.  Here's how:

 

Cut a 1/2-3/4" piece of tube and insert onto mandrel.  Slip on the desired bead.  Melt the bit of plastic ahead of the tube as if it were a completed fly.  Pull the tube off the mandrel and remove the bead or cone from the tube.  Next, insert the non-burned end into the back of the bead so the unburnt end comes out the front.  Trim down to size, insert onto the mandrel, and burn the tip as you did previously.  I find I need fewer fly boxes on the water this way.  Also, I save a lot of time at the vise.

 

Good luck 

 

Kevin 

 

 

IMG_1363.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 21.11.2018 at 0:58 AM, streamerchucker said:

I tied this hollow on a tube. I was wondering if anyone uses them or if anyone has any foul issues with the hook where it will sit further back?

A7B0E24D-2CB1-4962-B59B-93D8CD3BB410.jpeg

Great looking tube Hollow. If you have a good taper they won't foul all that much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.