shbeachbum

Officers bust 3 for poaching striped bass on Manasquan River

Rate this topic

56 posts in this topic

Today's Press:

Three Pennsylvania fishermen were caught in the act of poaching 87 striped bass on the Manasquan River, including 46 undersized bass. 

One of the men had a prior conviction for poaching striped bass and has had his fishing privileges revoked, according to state Department of Environmental Protection spokesperson Larry Hajna. 

The New Jersey Conservation Officer Association posted the incident to its Facebook this week, however, the three men were apprehended this summer and plead guilty to the charges in Brielle Municipal Court in September. 

Conservation Police Officer James Woerner, and Conservation Police Detective Christopher Moscatiello were alerted that fishermen were harvesting striped bass illegally by the New Jersey Transit railroad tracks, which span the river. 

Woerner and Moscatiello then conducted an overnight patrol on Aug. 28, along the river in Brielle and observed three fishermen suspected of harvesting large numbers of undersized striped bass.

 

The officers stopped two of the fishermen as they were on their way back to their vehicle and inspected their catch. The officers found the fishermen to be in possession of 31 undersized striped bass, according to the post. An officer then went out along the railroad tracks and scooped up a third fisherman, who was found to be in possession of 15 undersized striped bass.

The fishermen were issued court-mandatory summonses for possession of undersized and over-limit striped bass. The three men appeared in court Sept. 25. They are: 

  • Domingo Rodriguez, 51, of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania pleaded guilty to one charge of possession of 15 undersized striped bass and one charge of possession of 13 striped bass over the daily limit. A combined penalty of $2512 was assessed, plus court costs.
  • Luis A. Rivera Feliciano, 37, of Allentown, Pennsylvania pleaded guilty to one charge of possession of 14 undersized striped bass, and one charge of possession of 12 striped bass over the daily limit. A combined penalty of $2012 was assessed, plus court costs.
  • Victor M. Rivas, 52, of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania pleaded guilty to one charge of possession of 17 undersized striped bass and one charge of possession of 16 striped bass over the daily limit. A combined penalty of $3012 was assessed, plus court costs.

Rivas had a prior conviction in 2015 for striped bass violations. 

Rivas’ hunting and freshwater fishing license privileges are now suspended for two years in New Jersey.

New Jersey has no saltwater fishing license and so there is nothing to preclude Rivas from continuing to saltwater fish.

The suspension has been reported to the 46 other member states of the Interstate Wildlife Violator’s Compact, which may impose license suspensions as well. 

New Jersey regulations permit fishermen to harvest one striped bass between 28 and 43 inches, and one striped bass over 43 inches. 

 
 

Dan Radel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

NJ has mandatory requirement for saltwater registration.  I wonder if these guys had in their possession the registration card.

Edited by levari

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

Spot Burn,

i am always surprised how low the fine is. Maybe I’m paranoid, but even having the thought of keeping an undersized fish or an extra fish would cause a ranger to jump out of the bushes and rightfully shoot me.

Edited by Jason B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Keep your eyes peeled, that second offender will still be looking to pay for his penalty charges.   You can bet on it.  :banghd:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ol’ Mingo and Victor were there almost daily back in August. Glad they finally were caught...again...I’m sure they learned their lesson this time tho....:mad:

 

Im not much of a gambler, but I’d bet the three amigos are selling these fish.... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 mins ago, Local24 SSP said:

Ol’ Mingo and Victor were there almost daily back in August. Glad they finally were caught...again...I’m sure they learned their lesson this time tho....:mad:

 

Im not much of a gambler, but I’d bet the three amigos are selling these fish.... 

What's the difference if they are selling them, eating them or using them for tomato plant fertilizer?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

33 mins ago, MakoMike said:

What's the difference if they are selling them, eating them or using them for tomato plant fertilizer?

Making a monetary gain off of illegal fish (IMO) lands a little higher on the fu@$ed up scale then eating them or fertilizer. Not that the act is justified in any scenario. 

Edited by Local24 SSP
Words are hard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 40shades-of-blue said:

Give ICE a call while they are at it.

 

Yes ICE should have been contacted. Those three amigos probably won't even pay the fine........ they will be MIA's .

 

J:wag:n

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, shbeachbum said:

Today's Press:

Three Pennsylvania fishermen were caught in the act of poaching 87 striped bass on the Manasquan River, including 46 undersized bass. 

One of the men had a prior conviction for poaching striped bass and has had his fishing privileges revoked, according to state Department of Environmental Protection spokesperson Larry Hajna. 

The New Jersey Conservation Officer Association posted the incident to its Facebook this week, however, the three men were apprehended this summer and plead guilty to the charges in Brielle Municipal Court in September. 

Conservation Police Officer James Woerner, and Conservation Police Detective Christopher Moscatiello were alerted that fishermen were harvesting striped bass illegally by the New Jersey Transit railroad tracks, which span the river. 

Woerner and Moscatiello then conducted an overnight patrol on Aug. 28, along the river in Brielle and observed three fishermen suspected of harvesting large numbers of undersized striped bass.

 

The officers stopped two of the fishermen as they were on their way back to their vehicle and inspected their catch. The officers found the fishermen to be in possession of 31 undersized striped bass, according to the post. An officer then went out along the railroad tracks and scooped up a third fisherman, who was found to be in possession of 15 undersized striped bass.

The fishermen were issued court-mandatory summonses for possession of undersized and over-limit striped bass. The three men appeared in court Sept. 25. They are: 

  • Domingo Rodriguez, 51, of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania pleaded guilty to one charge of possession of 15 undersized striped bass and one charge of possession of 13 striped bass over the daily limit. A combined penalty of $2512 was assessed, plus court costs.
  • Luis A. Rivera Feliciano, 37, of Allentown, Pennsylvania pleaded guilty to one charge of possession of 14 undersized striped bass, and one charge of possession of 12 striped bass over the daily limit. A combined penalty of $2012 was assessed, plus court costs.
  • Victor M. Rivas, 52, of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania pleaded guilty to one charge of possession of 17 undersized striped bass and one charge of possession of 16 striped bass over the daily limit. A combined penalty of $3012 was assessed, plus court costs.

Rivas had a prior conviction in 2015 for striped bass violations. 

Rivas’ hunting and freshwater fishing license privileges are now suspended for two years in New Jersey.

New Jersey has no saltwater fishing license and so there is nothing to preclude Rivas from continuing to saltwater fish.

The suspension has been reported to the 46 other member states of the Interstate Wildlife Violator’s Compact, which may impose license suspensions as well. 

New Jersey regulations permit fishermen to harvest one striped bass between 28 and 43 inches, and one striped bass over 43 inches. 

 
 

Dan Radel

this one sounds like one I read here a year or 2 ago,even the names seem familiar.

glad they were got.

HH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, MakoMike said:

What's the difference if they are selling them, eating them or using them for tomato plant fertilizer?

Because if they are selling them someone else should have some LE problems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My point is that from a fishery perspective, which it seems is what most of you are bitching about, a dead fish is a dead fish. what happens to it after its dead has absolutely nothing to do with the future of the species' population.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.