bido

Jig Bite

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Just started fishing jigs last year.  I'm snagging a lot of fish.  Yesterday snagged half of the fish I caught probably, usually right under the chin.   Bigger fish are going to be lost like this...Bites felt solid like I should swing, but I guess I am too fast on the trigger.  Any tips from experienced jiggers?     Thanks.

 

Edited by bido

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Whats up haven't seen you down here !

I just started to try it, for a change up, It was a light bite, not the thump, or crunch, normally had on a bait rig.

I think the weight of the jig has something to do with it. Lighter the jig, the better you feel the bite?

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Depending on the size jig you are using, snagging the fish anywhere in the head area will be totally normal.  Fish normally attack their bait's head.  On a jig, the hook is on the back side.  So, if the fish grabs the jig towards the front or middle, and you set the hook, that tail hook will snag the head area and not be in the mouth.

Bluefish usually attack bait by biting tail.  So they will get hook in mouth normally.....butt, not always.

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I doubt that tog have a clue about whats the head and the tail or the ass.  I wouldn't even go as far  to call these things jigs. They are bait delivery tools with more flexibility than what we normally throw.  No idea why you're snagging them.  Usually when there are multiple fish going after the bait you tend to snag them especially when you swing too fast.  Maybe try a smaller piece of bait.

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Good solid bites (what feel like good, solid bites)...are small(er) fish. The fish are smashing the crab so they can eat it and you are hooking them on the smash, not the chew. The big ones pick it up and swim with it or lift it off the bottom when they inhale it. Or maybe I don't know anything, but I have caught a lot of fish on the jig this fall.

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16 hours ago, Slayer said:

Good solid bites (what feel like good, solid bites)...are small(er) fish. The fish are smashing the crab so they can eat it and you are hooking them on the smash, not the chew. The big ones pick it up and swim with it or lift it off the bottom when they inhale it. Or maybe I don't know anything, but I have caught a lot of fish on the jig this fall.

Good info.  I think because the jig bite is so much more sensitive that a smaller bite/smash feels like a "good" bite on a traditional tog rig.  I have to make some adjustments it seems.

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22 hours ago, Fly By Nite said:

I doubt that tog have a clue about whats the head and the tail or the ass.  I wouldn't even go as far  to call these things jigs. They are bait delivery tools with more flexibility than what we normally throw.  No idea why you're snagging them.  Usually when there are multiple fish going after the bait you tend to snag them especially when you swing too fast.  Maybe try a smaller piece of bait.

Agreed.  "jig" is the worst name for them.  They really should have been named something else.  There is no jigging involved. 

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20 hours ago, Slayer said:

Good solid bites (what feel like good, solid bites)...are small(er) fish. The fish are smashing the crab so they can eat it and you are hooking them on the smash, not the chew. The big ones pick it up and swim with it or lift it off the bottom when they inhale it. Or maybe I don't know anything, but I have caught a lot of fish on the jig this fall.

 

I'm starting to figure this out. The subtlest lift bites usually turn out to be my biggest fish. 

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20 hours ago, Slayer said:

Good solid bites (what feel like good, solid bites)...are small(er) fish. The fish are smashing the crab so they can eat it and you are hooking them on the smash, not the chew. The big ones pick it up and swim with it or lift it off the bottom when they inhale it. Or maybe I don't know anything, but I have caught a lot of fish on the jig this fall.

This. Little fish 'bite', bigger fish 'eat'. Little fish have to make the bait fit into their mouths - bigger fish just put the whole thing in their mouths, crunch once/twice and usually spit it out as soon as they've established that there's more in their mouth than just food. 

 

The thing is - if you are fishing where there's predominantly little fish - you won't have anything to gauge the difference between peckers pecking and bigger fish eating :)  Same thing as using the hook and sinker, ya can't swing at every thing. Best bet is not to swing at all - first lift a tiny bit...if you feel weight, follow through :th:

 

TimS

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On 11/14/2018 at 4:11 PM, TimS said:

This. Little fish 'bite', bigger fish 'eat'. Little fish have to make the bait fit into their mouths - bigger fish just put the whole thing in their mouths, crunch once/twice and usually spit it out as soon as they've established that there's more in their mouth than just food. 

 

The thing is - if you are fishing where there's predominantly little fish - you won't have anything to gauge the difference between peckers pecking and bigger fish eating :)  Same thing as using the hook and sinker, ya can't swing at every thing. Best bet is not to swing at all - first lift a tiny bit...if you feel weight, follow through :th:

 

TimS

^^^^^^^

Great advice Tim!!

My charter Capt. taught me to:

1) drop to the bottom

2) engage the reel and lift 

3) let down to touch bottom

4) set the hook when the "weighted hook" gets lifted by a fish.

This was on a glass calm day and may be hard to feel with an angry swell rolling through.

After 20 big fish that morning....

The technique became second nature.  

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