tomkaz

Help Me Buy & Outfit a Fat Tire Bike for the Beach

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77 posts in this topic

2 hours ago, beerdoh said:

Finally, you don't need super knobby tires on the beach unless it's muddy. Less knobs is a good thing when riding on hard packed sand or pavement as it reduces rolling resistance which can be very high with fat bikes in general. 

Beerdoh have you ever tried slicks on the beach?  

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PM me I am a self proclaimed fat bike expert lol I ride it year round like a crazy person haha.  I know all the tricks for budget bikes and can help you out.

 

matt

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Set it up so you can leave it alone for a bit.  A way to lock the rods in.  Maybe but the rod holder I node a crate and have a locking lid with cutout for the rod.

 

This way you can Leave it to go to a store or restroom and not worry about it.

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What do you guys suggest if you put new tires on a 29" wheeled mountain bike.  Not sure if it's 29 or 700mm It's been awhile since I looked at it like that.

 

After fishing sand hook this weekend, the bike idea sounds enticing.

 

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5 hours ago, YakDawg said:

Beerdoh have you ever tried slicks on the beach?  

Nope not slicks. I wouldn’t recommend slicks in the beach. There are lots of tire choices with varying tread depth and knobby size. You don’t need to go super aggressive but you do need some tread. 

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1 hour ago, salt deficient said:

What do you guys suggest if you put new tires on a 29" wheeled mountain bike.  Not sure if it's 29 or 700mm It's been awhile since I looked at it like that.

 

After fishing sand hook this weekend, the bike idea sounds enticing.

 

They make 29+ fires but your frame needs have clearance for them. Another option would be a set of 27+ tires but you would need new wheels. You’ll likely have vertical clearance gorvthose but may not have enough width clearance. My last 29er was compatible with 27+ But it was built that way. Tire and wheel size is one of the most confusing parts about mountain biking in general. 

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My buddy owns Roy’s in Coney Island. These bikes are crazy.  I haven’t ridden one yet. I assume it’s the easiest gear possible? I hear they are difficult obviously on sugar. 

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I see a lot of posts about tire pressure and size , but no mention of how many speeds these bikes should be . I've seen a few with only one speed , no derailleur and only one sprocket on the crank . That can't be good .

I would imagine that you would need some lower gearing to buzz the sand , no ? 

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All my mountain bikes are 1x11. 1 chain ring up front and a wide range 11 speed cassette in back allowing for 11 usable gears. This is the latest trend in off road gearing and is an amazing improvement. Having just a rear derailleur reduces complexity and weight. I ride on a lot of technical hilly terrain and am never wanting for a lower gear. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I just saw this thread. My two separate worlds are colliding!

 

If you want multiple gears, I would recommend an internal gear hub. Shimano nexus/alfine... something like that. Rohloff if you’re a big baller but it sounds like that may be jumping the gun a bit. Sand is very rough on traditional drive trains and even when being extremely careful some will inevitably end up in your cassette/derailleur/chain.

 

To take things a step further - a belt driven setup would be very nice because it uses no lube so there is nothing for sand to cling to.

 

In the Netherlands there is a huge beach racing scene. This has spawned some pretty cool inventions. Like others above said about not needing knobbies. Schwalbe tires makes a beach racing model that would be ideal on a fishing rig if you are looking to convert a bike you already have. I would try to get a front lowrider rack for the rods and maybe a basket for waders. Having weight on the front wheel will help balance weight distribution. 

Edited by TheNapeaguePissMan

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1 hour ago, beerdoh said:

Nope not slicks. I wouldn’t recommend slicks in the beach. There are lots of tire choices with varying tread depth and knobby size. You don’t need to go super aggressive but you do need some tread. 

I have read ALOT of discussions on MTBR and elsewhere and many guys recommend Surly Big Fat Larry tires for the sand.

surly-big-fat-larry-tire-619217-en.jpg

 

 

 

 

Not slicks but nothing like the Surly Bud and Lou combo which seem to be preferred for trail riding fat tire bikes.

 

P1020521.JPG

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1 hour ago, giant basshole said:

I see a lot of posts about tire pressure and size , but no mention of how many speeds these bikes should be . I've seen a few with only one speed , no derailleur and only one sprocket on the crank . That can't be good .

I would imagine that you would need some lower gearing to buzz the sand , no ? 

Again, my education on this started last week so take everything I say with a shaker of salt. 

 

Based on what I have read, most guys who buy or build beach-specific bikes use only a rear gear set with a single sprocket up front. Rear gearing ranges from 7 to as many as 11 rings in the rear. This seems to be about all the range you need for the beach and most other flat terrain usage. It also means one less piece of equipment to get fracked up my the sand and salt. 

 

If the desire is to take it into the woods as well, or do higher speed road riding, then a second sprocket up front provides a wider range of gearing. Then again, there no reason to not use a 2x system on the beach, just stay with the lowest gearing while on the sand. 

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47 mins ago, TheNapeaguePissMan said:

 

To take things a step further - a belt driven setup would be very nice because it uses no lube so there is nothing for sand to cling to.

^^^ All the recommendations are to use a DRY lube and apply at least the night before a ride. 

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14 hours ago, ridenfish said:

Ive been wanting to do this for a long time. Is it tough to ride with waders on? I would love to be able to cover miles of beach in a day. That cheap Mongoose is the way to go, might have to get me one and modify it. Only problem is my Thule rack won't handle a fattie.

I strap the waders to the rear rack.  Too hard to ride in them.  Thule makes a fat bike conversion kit for it's tray type racks.

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I have 3 fat bikes.  One set up for the beach, one full rigid for training, and one full suspension bike. Don't ask me how many bikes I have total.  But, that being said, I spend my money on bikes and fishing mostly and some firearms stuff.  No coke, no hookers, no classic cars.  Once you start riding a fat bike you don't even want to go back to a regular mtb.  Being able to combine biking and fishing is awesome.  Easily allows me to cruise to isolated spots that would take much longer to walk to.  I'm mostly catch and release, but you may wish to bring a small cooler attached to a rack if you intend on keeping a fish.  Check out www.fat-bike.com

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