tomkaz

Help Me Buy & Outfit a Fat Tire Bike for the Beach

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3 mins ago, beerdoh said:

I had a Raleigh Grand Prix with Suntour components. It was a green one. I also had a Raleigh Robin Hood 3 speed. Those were cool bike in the day. Moto disappeared and someone bought the name. They are no longer a French company. 

Anyway I see the lower braze-ons on the momentum but didn't see any further up on the seat stays. There could be a mount on the brake bridge that you wouldn't be able to see. Regardless, I believe in supporting my LBS where I can but in some cases, the on-line deals are hard to pass up. Ask them to do a tubeless conversion for you to seal the deal. 

 

Ha! Suntour! Sounds oh so familiar. Mine was blue.

 

I too had a Raleigh 3-speed, a Chopper model, same as below. Too funny. 

 

Raleigh-Chopper-bisiklet-.jpg

Edited by tomkaz

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His is a Mango cruiser, also checked their site and they do have fat tire mountain bikes with aluminum frames 

 

I would echo the girls bike or many mountain bikes with lower bar height.

 

some of the bikes list rust resistant chains and spokes. Internal ub might be easier to maintain?

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For beach riding look for 100mm rims and 4.8"-5.25" or larger tires.  Expect to air them down to 4-6 psi.  The easiest riding is done at low tide below the rack line.  The sand will be firmest and you can cruise.  With the wind at your back you can easily hit 10-15 mph.  Always ride into the wind first and then have it at your back on the way back.  Nothing like riding too far, only to realize you have to ride back into the wind and it takes you twice as long.  If the beach is crowded, dismount and walk the bike, no need to get people pissed and fat bikes banned from the beach.  They are banned in the Cape from what I hear.  Enjoy.

fat bike.jpg

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17 mins ago, fatbikerjoe said:

For beach riding look for 100mm rims and 4.8"-5.25" or larger tires.  Expect to air them down to 4-6 psi.  The easiest riding is done at low tide below the rack line.  The sand will be firmest and you can cruise.  With the wind at your back you can easily hit 10-15 mph.  Always ride into the wind first and then have it at your back on the way back.  Nothing like riding too far, only to realize you have to ride back into the wind and it takes you twice as long.  If the beach is crowded, dismount and walk the bike, no need to get people pissed and fat bikes banned from the beach.  They are banned in the Cape from what I hear.  Enjoy.

fat bike.jpg

Joe, thanks. Rod holder up front vs in back? That's unusual, no? 

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46 mins ago, tomkaz said:

Ha! Suntour! Sounds oh so familiar. Mine was blue.

 

I too had a Raleigh 3-speed, a Chopper model, same as below. Too funny. 

 

Raleigh-Chopper-bisiklet-.jpg

Awesome !

 

I had a Raleigh Fastback in yellow...

It ended as a modified chopper, with 3 foot long forks...

 

^..^

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Posted (edited) · Report post

28 mins ago, tomkaz said:

Joe, thanks. Rod holder up front vs in back? That's unusual, no? 

I liked having it up front better so that I could keep an eye on the rod and it stays more upright.  I also  thought it would help keep the reel out of the kicked up sand from the rear wheel.

Edited by fatbikerjoe

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26” Mongoose donomite from Walmart about 280.00$ rack 20.00$ 1/2 plywood ,1 1/2 pvc pipe  and tackle bag from  Cabelas ,bike is unbelievable on beach and very affordable I hope this info is useful for you.

F8DA899C-B63F-4701-A1C4-5686277B491E.jpeg

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BikesDirect has been mentioned.  Good place for a starter fattie

 

Make sure that whatever bike you get can handle 4.8 tires; 4" tires are not enough for the soft stuff that you describe. Best yet is 4.8" on 100mm rims, but I don't know if you can find one outfitted like that retail...

 

L

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13 hours ago, lolipop said:

BikesDirect has been mentioned.  Good place for a starter fattie

 

Make sure that whatever bike you get can handle 4.8 tires; 4" tires are not enough for the soft stuff that you describe. Best yet is 4.8" on 100mm rims, but I don't know if you can find one outfitted like that retail...

 

L

All the more reason to buy used, you get to take advantage of getting exactly what you want for probably 60% cost of new if condition is good. If the 4.8" tires are the way to go, you need to go that way.  And if you don't like it, you sell it and if you bought it right, you'll lose nothing, if you overpaid maybe you lose 10-20%. Buy one of them $600 new models and in 3 months you want something else, you get $300, its a loser. Buy a $600 used bike that sold new for $1000 that has all the horns and whistles you need. You won't regret it.

 

I know nothing about bikes, I focus on cost, quality, and  performance. Why would you want more than two rods? And riding in sand is brutal, you need every advantage you can find so weight and tire size are important.  

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Ive been wanting to do this for a long time. Is it tough to ride with waders on? I would love to be able to cover miles of beach in a day. That cheap Mongoose is the way to go, might have to get me one and modify it. Only problem is my Thule rack won't handle a fattie.

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Responding to lollipop, two years on the beach with this bike, and trough trial and era this bike is unbelievable on the trails and beach. I have two rod holders because one pole is for bait and the other is for pluging on the beach, and lakes and streams in the woods one for fly rod and one for  spin rod, please keep in mind it’s all about tire pressure on the beach. I hope this info is helpful for you I’m a 40 Year surf fishing man I modified this bike under 400,00$ but you can spend 600 to 1000,00$ to impress but all we’re looking to do here is to find the fish on the beach.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I had read about but not fully considered the functional difference between 4.0” and 4.8” tires and wheel width. 

 

I am 5’11” and 205# (on a good day). Beefy enough but at 58, past my days of tearing up single track. Add the fishing gear and then anything that helps “float” over sand is welcome. 

 

Buying gently used makes makes much sense, I just have to hunt out the right shop. The demographic in this area is right for guys to have gone out, spent $1000-1500 on a name bike and then have it collect dust in overpacked garage. But they are also the types who don’t “need” to sell them to get cash back.

 

The quest continues. 

 

@Jonnyplugs - I keep going back and forth on Mongoose. I am reading too many fat bike websites and have become jaded in going the cheap route.  Still on my list though. 

Edited by tomkaz

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My bike originally came with the Nates (3.8) and did fine on the beach and occaisional snow ride.  After 2 years I did move up to the Larry's (4.7) and had just enough room to mount them.  I didn't notice a huge difference but I wanted to make pedalling in the soft stuff as easy as possible.  

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Regarding tires. The difference between 3.8" and 4.7" tires on the beach isn't that noticeable. In deep, dry sand it's hard going no matter what. If you aren't super fit most will end up walking through those sections.

When riding (not fishing) on single track trails I keep my tire pressure at around 7 or 8 PSI. When riding on the beach I drop it to 2 PSI for more float. This is another reason to go tubeless. If you are running with tubes at low pressure you run the risk of getting "pinch" flats where the tube get's pinched between the tire and the rim (e.g. on beaches with lots of big rocks). When running tubeless this isn't an issue. You can run through a thorn bush and not even know your tire is full of thorns. The sealant seals it instantly. 

Finally, you don't need super knobby tires on the beach unless it's muddy. Less knobs is a good thing when riding on hard packed sand or pavement as it reduces rolling resistance which can be very high with fat bikes in general. 

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