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bonefishdick

Structure Change

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The others day Mike Mathias ( dbhauler ) sent me a text with couple of pictures of my favorite beach, the first from 2016 and the second from 2018. Both were from GOOGLE EARTH and they showed dramatic changes in just two short years.

 

It was very obvious the toll that the winter NE storms took not only on this beach  but on many of the East facing beaches. We bothe agreed that because of this situation it was the main reason the fishing has not and is not what it was for many  years. I think what bothers me most is this particular beach was almost mine all the time I fished it for many years. All I can do now is hope that things will settle down and that the structure will start to reform. I know the chances are slim but you can hope.

 

I then decided to look at the structural changes that took place on all the beaches from Plymouth to Brewster with the hopes of finding some places that were still okay and had some structure but what it showed was all the beaches that I thought I could access had very little to nothing in the way of Structure in many cases.

 

I believe that the way things are now is that there wil be days when these beaches will have lights out days but it will be you will have to be there at the right time. Those days will happen because the bait will be there but won’t hold up long because there will be nothing to hold the bait in place for very long.

 

We believe it will be a year of moving around a lot with the hopes of finding some places that may actually have some structure that will hold up or will get better as some structure will reform over the summer.

 

I was wondering if others have found the situation is similar in places they fish as well.

 

No need to get specific.

 

 

Edited by bonefishdick

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Dick,

I just reviewed the pictures taken of your beach in 2012, and guess what, the beach looks like it does in 2018, no structure. It took 4 years until 2016 for that structure to form.

 

So if winter storms or storms in general remain the same as in the past, we may not see that same structure or any type of structure return for another 3 to 4 years.

 

I think your right we may have to find new beaches with structure. I looked on Google at beaches further east along the same coast and found little structure as we had for the last couple years at Bonefish Beach. There is some structure, of a different types, but not like those bowls we had. Also some of these beaches are like you said not easily accessible. 

 

Edited by dblhauler

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Re Structure:

I had a ball on a tidal flat with zero structure at low incoming.  I waited until the water reached a few inches below my knees - casted toward the drop-off that was 200 - 300 yds away and caught fish after fish that were swimming onto the flat looking for food.

Even though the fish were smallish (20-25") it was fun.

I guess you can say the structure was the drop-off.  But the fish had no problem swimming away from it and onto the flat.

Of course the fish spread out as the water level rose.

Herb

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HL, I agree a drop off is structure and if you can reach it can be lights out.

 

That type off structure can be a lot of fun, especially when you learn how to fish it

 

 

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We get massive structure changes in Plymouth Bay year to year. Browns Bank shifts, dumps more sand on the point, extends furhter down into Warren Cove. The channel between the Point and Browns Bank is shrinking. I'm assuming it'll go away at some point and Browns Bank will become a part of Long Beach. There's a big shoal off the head now that extends out toward Bug Light. Can't tell you how many boats got stuck out there trying to access Browns Bank at low tide this year. 

 

The fishing is still productive all around the Bank, especially the dropping tide. But every year you need to figure out (1) where the fish are now holding at different stages of the tide and (2) how the hell you access some of these spots at mid to low  

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I'm gonna jump in here with a sailor's perspective as well as a fisherman's.  As a sailor, I never trust the charts, always on the lookout for tell tale signs of structure, which is bad for sailboats, but good for fishing. Ocean structure changes, that's a given.  It really doesn't matter what the cause is, natural or man made, structure changes.  What does not change is how water flow over a particular kind of structure behaves.  

 

We fish flats one way, deep cuts another, longshore bars, outflows, jetties. . .

 

Observe and fish appropriately

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41 mins ago, Oakman said:

I'm gonna jump in here with a sailor's perspective as well as a fisherman's.  As a sailor, I never trust the charts, always on the lookout for tell tale signs of structure, which is bad for sailboats, but good for fishing. Ocean structure changes, that's a given.  It really doesn't matter what the cause is, natural or man made, structure changes.  What does not change is how water flow over a particular kind of structure behaves.  

 

We fish flats one way, deep cuts another, longshore bars, outflows, jetties. . .

 

Observe and fish appropriately

Well said

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Hey Oakman, what are you sailing on an where? My last boat was a. Cabo Rico  38 we sailed Maine to New York. Great comment but today there's too much dependence on electronics. When. I started sailing you had to do Dead Reckoning for navigating.

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For this reason I am still struggling with beach fishing.  I do well in boulder fields, inlets, inshore flats, and estuaries.  But beaches have been primarily miss for me.  I did have the best day of my life fishing a beach during a storm this past October.  The beach had produced very little all year until this outing.  I got five fish over 40 inches and a ton of keeper to 35 inch fish, but I was using surfcasting gear because wind got up to close to 30 mph.  I had fly rod but when i got out of car I immediately put it back and grabbed the surf rod.  Did not thrown anything less than 3 oz just to get required casting distance.  Other than that one day my stats for the year were 8 beach trips, 6 skunks, one okay trip, and the epic high surf trip.

 

Maybe I just need to fish with guys that understand beaches better than me to learn them.  My general impression is my main beach has very little structure on the 7 miles of it.  I have run it and hiked it and scouted the hell out of it.  It seems pretty damn featureless for 6.85 miles.  There is one little spot and that is where I did well on the high surf trip, but I had hit it under normal conditions and been skunked three times previously.

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