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AHest.04

Salt water fly line

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I recently got a saltwater fly rod. 9' 9wt TFO. I do a lot of spin fishing off the beach and know the smaller stripers are in tight to the beach. I'm not a great caster yet, getting better but still can't get the fly out very far. My rod came with a floating line, should I be using a shooting head intermediate sink to get it out there a little further or just keep practicing?

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Practice.... is my recommendation ...

Technic allow to compensate for sub par equipment , the inverse is not true...

 

 Have fun!

 

dc

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You should join whatever flyfishing club is local to you and get one of the members to help you with casting, no equipment will make your technique better.

JC

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You don't say how much flyfishing experience you have, but your post suggests little or none. 

 

My recommendation would be to get casting lessons from an instructor. This does two things: 1) speeds up your learning curve, making you a better caster faster, and 2) helps prevent you from learning bad habits if you are trying to self-teach yourself. This would be my primary effort, were I you. 

 

As for line, you can use and get by with a floating line, but ultimately you are prolly gonna want an intermediate line. 

 

But making getting some good casting instruction your first and primary goal. 

 

My 2 cents, worth exactly what you paid for it.

 

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Knowing that you don’t have a lot of experience will get you some tips on what to do, the first being take a lesson or two is one of the best. 

 

To to start out with a floating line is okay but I think an intermediate would serve you better.

 

I am not sure what the reference being made to about sup par equipment means. I will say this, TFO makes very good equipment and I would not considered their fly rod to be sub par. ( especially since I own a number of their rods). 

 

With regards to a the floating line I don’t know who makes that either so again hard to say it is sub par.

 

A floating line line is generally harder to fish in the salt since it is harder to load and more wind resistant. The do have their time and place but for fishing off the beach an intermediate will load better and since it doesn’t ride on the surface and in the wave action it will be easier to control.

 

I would if you know someone who fly fishes try to at least get together with that person to see if they can help you out. 

 

There are some videos on YouTube that may help, the one thing I would tell you is to work on the mechanics and the distance will come. The other thing is to watch you line and make sure that it straightens out before you make a forward or backcast. One of the biggest  mistakes is people think casting a fly rod is done very fast when in fact it is a much slower casting process. If you don’t let the line get straight, you end up with a s shape over your head and that means your changing your stroke to fast. Let the line load.

 

 The other suggestion is don’t start with a weighted fly.

Edited by bonefishdick

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Big Stripers also come close to the beach edge to and sod bank edges and any kind of structure. Fly fishing is not just about small fish. If it was I for one would not bother with it.

Not easy to go from zero to competent at a stroke but you can shorten the learning curve quite a bit.

Spending time on this forum is pretty educational. Have a delve into books by Ray Bonderew and Lou Tabory. Great way to get in depth knowledge.

Fundamental to all fishing is going able to get our bait ,lure or fly to the fish. Without that everything else is secondary. The advice about getting a good cast has already been given.

If you have some time to give to learning you can pick this sport up fairly quickly.

I could see no reason why in say six months you can’t be mixing it with most of the guys. The effort you put in at the front end will pay huge dividends for the rest of your fly fishing life.

Its fun enjoy the ride. Great thing is the ride never ends.

 

mike

 

Edited by Mike Oliver

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10 hours ago, AHest.04 said:

My rod came with a floating line, should I be using a shooting head intermediate sink to get it out there a little further or just keep practicing?

Higher density line has less wind resistance so there come better casting performance but it is way less than casting practice in the beginning of FF.

 

If you can access intrernet when practicing the Fly Casting Video Masterclass is excellent method to self learn fly line casting. There is three hours of lessons done by Paul Arden who is hard core fly fisherman, very good casting instructor, competition caster and rod designer.

 

Esa

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2 hours ago, bonefishdick said:

 

I am not sure what the reference being made to about sup par equipment means. I will say this, TFO makes very good equipment and I would not considered their fly rod to be sub par. ( especially since I own a number of their rods). 

 

With regards to a the floating line I don’t know who makes that either so again hard to say it is sub par.

 

My bad:  confusing... I was not referencing the particular setup of the OP but the overall strategy which is to compensate with equipment instead of working on casting fundamentals... thanks for pointing out.

 

dc

 

Edited by dcote

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My cousin started learning this summer as well. I'm no casting instructor but I got him through the basics. I started him with one of my 8 weights with an intermediate line, he seemed to have difficulty with his initial backcast using that line and that messed with his timing throughout. I then switched him to my integrated shooting head for 1 day, just so he could better feel how the rod loads and that helped. I had him throw this off a jetty, which was easier than picking up off the beach. Finally moved him to my 7 weight with a floating line and a small fly with bead chain eyes (much lighter than a regular clouser) and that seemed to be the easiest for him to cast, at least for now. He's very patient and content to focus on just getting the casting down whether he catches fish or not which helps. I think the intermediate is probably better for catching fish but the floater is easier to make progress casting, at least for him it worked out that way...

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Stormy

Yes agree a floater is way easier to start as no worries about it sinking and having to unplug if practice is done over water. Grass works to but can’t beat the real thing.

I just can’t recall what my early struggles were like. About as bad as they are now. LoL

 

Mike

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4 hours ago, Mike Oliver said:

Stormy

Yes agree a floater is way easier to start as no worries about it sinking and having to unplug if practice is done over water. Grass works to but can’t beat the real thing.

I just can’t recall what my early struggles were like. About as bad as they are now. LoL

 

Mike

My earliest struggle was trying to figure out how to cast with the pyramid sinker tied to the line. A guy gave me the outfit without any info so I tried to use it like my friends used their casting outfits. Massive fail. I at least progressed from that...

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Thanks for all the replies. I have some experience, but not much. I have learned a lot here and online. I can cast decently but not all the time and when conditions get tough I fall apart. I will take the advice of most and keep practicing and then move to an intermediate sink. Thanks. 

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As I remember back in the days, me and other friends we made real progress when tried lines with short and heavy head.Wulff Ambush and Rio Outbound short were the easiest lines to cast when we couldn't carry too much head in the air and we were not able to feel the shock bump in back cast.

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The other part solution is to turn and watch your back cast. Not even short heavy heads will give good feedback if insufficient energy is imparted to the line so it will extend fully straight. Or loops are hopelessly large.

Gear is rarely the solution to casting issues. It is counter productive.

 

Mike.

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