Steve in Mass

Venision Shanks

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11 posts in this topic

Yeah, Osso Bucco......

 

 

But can I cut off the raw meat, grind it and use it for burgers? If not, gotta change dinner plans for tomorrow. Had a package marked stew meat, and thought it was something different. Good thing I opened it up before defrosting....... :o

 

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Wow, abosoluty you can trim and grind, but that’s quite a bit of work for burgers. You’ll be missing out on a great cut for braising like you first mentioned. 

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34 mins ago, iceberg57 said:

Wow, abosoluty you can trim and grind, but that’s quite a bit of work for burgers. You’ll be missing out on a great cut for braising like you first mentioned. 

Yeah, after thinking about it more, likely not the best part to grind....all those tendons and ligaments need the slow braise to break down to yummy-ness. Donna is not big on that type of stewed thing, but, well, too bad......

 

So, we switch gears, and those stay in the freezer for a few more weeks........

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Good call. They make some killer OB. she might like the venison version as is is not as ‘greasy’ as a veal shank ( which aren’t really greasy at all but sometimes that’s what turn folks off to braised meat). Enjoy them 

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Some of the best slow cooked meals you’ll have. I do the same with the front shoulders. Don’t waste your time cutting and grinding. 

 

I keep it real simple. 

Carrots, mushrooms, onions in roaster pan. Place shanks or shoulder on top and cover halfway up with a jar(s) of tomato sauce. Cook covered for 4 hours at 225, add potatoes and cook for one more hour. You can literally just grab the bone and the meat falls right off. 

 

The next day it makes great topping for a burger. Warm up meat and sauce, place over cooked burger. 

 

 

Edited by saltfisherman

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This is the only part of the deer worth using for stew imho.  The sinew in the muscle renders elegantly when slow cooked and melts in your mouth.  Unlike a meaty piece of roast thats just 

...welll meaty.  Shanks were made for stew.  I also use the round roast when im out of shanks as it also has some of that sinew.

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Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Heat the oil in a large Dutch oven or deep ovenproof skillet over medium heat. Brown Shanks and remove to plate. Add the onion, celery, carrot, and season with 2 teaspoons salt and pepper to taste. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are tender and just beginning to brown, about 20 minutes. Add the garlic and tomato paste, mix well and cook until the tomato paste darkens, about 3 minutes.

Lay Shanks in a single layer, over the vegetables in the Dutch oven. Add wine and enough stock to surround but not cover the shanks and bring to a simmer. Transfer to the oven. Braise the shanks, uncovered if not browned first, turning every 30 minutes or so, until the meat is fork tender, about 2 hours. (The meat will brown during the final stages of braising.) Remove from the oven and set aside to cool for about 15 minutes to allow the fat to rise to the surface of the sauce. Transfer the meat to a plate.

Skim the fat from the surface of the braising liquid. Strain the sauce through a fine mesh strainer into a bowl, pressing down on the vegetables with a spoon to extract as much liquid as possible. Discard the vegetables. Degrease the sauce again if necessary and return to the Dutch oven. Simmer the sauce until reduced by about half. Return the shanks to the sauce, and warm gently over low heat. Taste the sauce and adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper to taste. Transfer to a warm serving dish and serve.

 These go good with Roasted Root Vegetables and Mashed Taters

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17 hours ago, Steve in Mass said:

Yeah, after thinking about it more, likely not the best part to grind....all those tendons and ligaments need the slow braise to break down to yummy-ness. Donna is not big on that type of stewed thing, but, well, too bad......

 

So, we switch gears, and those stay in the freezer for a few more weeks........

There an itslian place we go to that often has osso bucco ravioli as a special. They prepare the shanks as you typically would, remove the meat, separate any connective tissue and then stuff pasta pillows. Quick boil to cook the pasta.

 

They take the pan juices and cooked veggies from the pot and blend them with an immersion blender. Makes for a very thick "gravy" that does not require any flour to thicken. 

 

They serve the ravs with the osso bucco juice/gravy ladled over the top. Top with some parm shavings.  Before I was GF, that was a favorite. 

 

One night they had a "game menu" special that included the above done with wild boar. Makes me wish we could get acorn fed boar here. 

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Forgot to post but finally got around to these this past Saturday, and it came out awesome.

 

Kept it simple with just some diced onions, carrots, garlic, celery, sauteed until soft, added some diced tomatoes (frozen/thawed from the garden), some red wine, some chicken sock, sprigs of fresh thyme.......

 

Complimented the venison shanks with two small hind quarter beef shank slices. Browned all that off (forgot to dredge in flour first, but no loss), de-glazed that pan into the veggies.

 

All together in the Dutch Oven, covered at 275 for about 3 hours.......

 

Removed the meat/bones to a plate, hit the gravy with an immersion blender, and then reduced a bit. All into a serving casserole......

 

Simple mashed potatoes and then the side veggies of celeriac,  carrots, leeks, parsnips, tossed in melted duck fat, sprinkled with fresh garlic and rosemary, and roasted in a 425 oven for half an hour.

 

Simply heaven, and the leftovers on Monday were just as good. :)

 

 

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