squammer

Bucktail Weights for My Area and Rods?

Rate this topic

23 posts in this topic

I have one bucktail currently and I fished this a good amount this year. It's a 1oz Spro white bucktail that sinks wicked fast -- not much hair on it. Looking to add some more bucktails to my tackle box and found ones that looks nice -- they are called S&S Bucktails John Skinner Striped Bass. I like the look of these because the have more hair and look like they wont sink so fast.

 

I use two rods -- one is around 7' and the other is 8' and they are both Medium or MH rated for ~10-20 lb line. The 1oz Spro bucktail I have casts like a bullet with very low arch from the fast-action rod rip. I cast off the docks in my neighborhood into shallower water at spots (~10-20 feet) and then also into the current of a river (Annisquam River) near the mouth of a large bay (Ipswich Bay). This current in this river when the tide changes can be raging hard. I also cast off the rocks into rocky areas along the coast (Gloucester, Rockport, Marblehead areas).

 

I was thinking of getting 3 bucktails -- 3/4oz (for shallower areas with rocks) and 1.5oz (for casting into raging current) in white. I was also thinking of a black 1oz one for fishing at night. I fish at night mostly. Anyone use chartreause/neon green?

 

Thanks for any tips.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by squammer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look at some Andrus bucktails for casting. Bunch of styles and weights. Check out Dan the Tinmans stuff in the BST section also. Spro style isn't always the best for cast and reel action. The skinner S&S ones are good from a boat. And yes you will want to by them in multiples. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 mins ago, FunkyBunker said:

Look at some Andrus bucktails for casting. Bunch of styles and weights. Check out Dan the Tinmans stuff in the BST section also. Spro style isn't always the best for cast and reel action. The skinner S&S ones are good from a boat. And yes you will want to by them in multiples. 

Interesting. What makes a bucktail better for use from boat vs land? I will look into Andrus and others. Thanks for the recommendations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, squammer said:

Interesting. What makes a bucktail better for use from boat vs land? I will look into Andrus and others. Thanks for the recommendations.

The eye placement on the bucktail..........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 mins ago, squammer said:

Interesting. What makes a bucktail better for use from boat vs land? I will look into Andrus and others. Thanks for the recommendations.

On the spro BT's the hook eye is further back and the weight of the lure is more towards the front so works better with a vertical jigging action. On the S&S skinner ones he moved the eye more towards the front but still fishes similar to a spro. Look at the Andrus jetty caster, ball jig and rip splitters to see the difference. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMO, what you have listed as "to get", sounds about right for weight if the water depth is 10' to 20' as you say. In places I've fished I've used everything from 1/8 oz, up to about 2 oz for casting, and heavier for trolling. Probably used 1/2 oz to 1 oz the most, because of shallower water. The idea of having them dressed both full and sparse is also good. For the same weight, a fuller tied bucktail will sink slower than a sparser tied bucktail. Nothing wrong with that and can be advantageous because sometimes the fish want that slower fall, and it tends to keep the jig in front of them a little longer when they're suspended. Add some different trailers, various plastics and the combinations of bucktail & trailer can allow you to fine tune profiles & fall rates. Pork rind is still a great trailer if you can find it. 

 

For colors, everyone has favorites. Those discussions have been done many times. Hard to go wrong with white, black, chartreuse, and yellow is very popular. Wine or Burgundy, is also good colors. But, the fact is it still goes back to everyone has a favorite. I've tried all kinds of colors &  combinations over the years, and they'll all catch some fish, sometimes. I like chartreuse for example that is more on the yellow chartreuse, fl. yellow side but still keep some jigs that are on the green chartreuse, or lime green side, because sometimes one produces better than the other when they'll take a "chartreuse" bucktail. Try some different colors and see what works for you, day or night. 

Edited by tidewaterfly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many folks like white.  Don't forget something to trail it.  Usually use the berkley powerbait mullet grub.

 

Backbays, little to no flow....  3/4 to 1.5oz.    

 

Inlets, water moving well....  1oz to 3oz usually,  sometimes you need more.

 

Bought some from dan the tin man recently, they're great.  He's has a bullethead style with the hook eye right upfront at a 45degree.   I swear dan uses 3 to 4 times as much hair as the leading guys.   Mustad makes a bucktail with 2 hook eyes.

 

Don't think more is better.  OFten yes, all the time, no.  You need the right bucktail for the job.  Looks right for what's in the area size wise, but gets down to where the fish are, but not all the way down.

 

Back to color,  I like white with a touch of another color all weights.  A few yellow ones and a few dark ones.  Wine or burple.  Dark colors work at the right times at night, not every night.

 

While your bucktailing, get some cheap good sized grubs and jigheads, and a few tsunami shads too.  Very similar action and style.

 

Chratruse, some folks believe they're more of a bluefish magnet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Andrus Jetty Casters- white - 1/2oz /1 oz. / 1 1/4oz./ 1 1/2 oz./ 2 oz. and 3oz.  Also. get some white trailers from Fat Cow strips, Otter tails or plastic ( rubber) twister tails. I would also buy a few small "lima bean" head bucktails from Andrus in white in sizes 3/8 oz. and 1/2 oz. to use from an "egg and a jig" rig. See photo. This rig is one of the best lures for daytime stripers. You'll have to find some wooden eggs from a craft store and make them up over the winter. A very easy project.

88CE4B08-C280-4D15-90AC-AEDF76658C84.jpeg

EAF1504E-9D0E-4CF6-962F-DE065F373C81.jpeg

Edited by VanStaalSteve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if you are fishing Chatham and Brewster with any regularity i would for the bucktails and go with a small paddle tail such as Al gags whippet or storm search baits either 1/4 oz 3/8 or 1/2.at least from the beach.before these plastics came out i fished bucktails almost exclusively,fishing the inlets on the south shore of LI,i literally have at least a thousand of them from a 1/4 oz up to 6ozs,and they rarely get used on the sand beachs of the cape.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steve do you ever use heavy plastic or composition eggs to get down deep?  The wooden egg helps the cast but doesn't it keep the jig off the bottom or does the jig take the egg down.  Are you eggs made of a hard wood ( Oak )  or are the light weight made of a soft wood ( pine ).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/3/2018 at 8:06 AM, l.i.fish.in.vt said:

if you are fishing Chatham and Brewster with any regularity i would for(go) the bucktails and go with a small paddle tail such as Al gags whippet or storm search baits either 1/4 oz 3/8 or 1/2.at least from the beach.before these plastics came out i fished bucktails almost exclusively,fishing the inlets on the south shore of LI,i literally have at least a thousand of them from a 1/4 oz up to 6ozs,and they rarely get used on the sand beachs of the cape.

Good idea. I already own a Hogy Paddle Tail in 2oz that I use mainly in Chatham but I added some lighter weight/smaller Storm WildEye rubbers to my list to buy for shallower water in Brewster and Monomoy flats. When I am on the flats, I find myself fly fishing most of the time...

 

I bought some Andrus Jetty Caster Bucktails from JH last night -- went with a 3/4oz and a 1.5oz for now (white). If I find the need, I will also fill in the other weights in the Spring.

 

Thanks everyone..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/3/2018 at 8:49 AM, ccb said:

Steve do you ever use heavy plastic or composition eggs to get down deep?  The wooden egg helps the cast but doesn't it keep the jig off the bottom or does the jig take the egg down.  Are you eggs made of a hard wood ( Oak )  or are the light weight made of a soft wood ( pine ).

No, the “egg and jig “ was developed to deliver a small bucktail (3/8 to 1/2 oz.) a long distance. Also,  it enables a surf guy to fish a bucktail in shallow water without fouling bottom. I  don’t really know what the “eggs” are made out of? They are bought in craft stores and are pretty heavy. They cast a mile and a fisherman can cover a lot of water with them. The rig is a very, very productive way to catch bass I daylight hours. Works on deep water too if stripers are feeding near surface. 

Edited by VanStaalSteve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.