ATBfish

Brand new kayak owner-must have accessories

36 posts in this topic

On 11/1/2018 at 10:16 PM, staktup said:

Here's another one if you have degrading shoulders and no pick-up truck: Thule Hullavator.  I just had an MRI done on Monday because my right shoulder (I have had a history of problems with both), is worse than ever.  So last year and this summer, I amassed some used hullys.  I got one used set for $250, and another one for $180.  They run like $600 or so new and keep me in this hobby.

I had a major spinal fusion this year and I am looking into getting a hullavator so I can still enjoy kayaking.  Can't imagine paying $650 so waiting to see if i can find a good sale or a used set. I can't see any other way to car top a kayak safely anymore.

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On 11/3/2018 at 0:09 PM, njfish4life said:

I had a major spinal fusion this year and I am looking into getting a hullavator so I can still enjoy kayaking.  Can't imagine paying $650 so waiting to see if i can find a good sale or a used set. I can't see any other way to car top a kayak safely anymore.

Hullavator is SOOO worth it.  I always say, Hullavator, Drysuit and Wheeleez the most ridiculously expensive things in kayak fishing that are worth the money, they are kind of like a pedal kayak.  No one wants to spend the money, but after struggling with other options, they ultimately do and always say "wow, what was I waiting for?"  I may add PLB, but I just hope to never need to use it.

 

Back on the hullavator, here is an added tip.  It can still be a struggle to lift the kayak off the ground and then into the Hullavator.  I made up a set of PVC Kayak stands.  I first put the kayak in those and then when it's already waist high, It's a LOT easier to lift it into the hullavator.  I only wish you could load the hullavator one end of the kayak at a time, but it has to go in all at once.

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Ditto on those three must have items! And get the largest size of wheeleez tires , much much easier to roll than the smaller ones .

4 hours ago, atv223 said:

Hullavator is SOOO worth it.  I always say, Hullavator, Drysuit and Wheeleez the most ridiculously expensive things in kayak fishing that are worth the money, they are kind of like a pedal kayak.  No one wants to spend the money, but after struggling with other options, they ultimately do and always say "wow, what was I waiting for?"  I may add PLB, but I just hope to never need to use it.

 

Back on the hullavator, here is an added tip.  It can still be a struggle to lift the kayak off the ground and then into the Hullavator.  I made up a set of PVC Kayak stands.  I first put the kayak in those and then when it's already waist high, It's a LOT easier to lift it into the hullavator.  I only wish you could load the hullavator one end of the kayak at a time, but it has to go in all at once.

 

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learn and master loading-from-the-rear technique. 

 

Say nyet to loading from the side.

 

With sedan: a bathroom mat on the edge of rear trunk. Thicker the better, grippier the rubberish bottom the merrier. Another rug up the rear glass and onto the roof.

 

Lift the nose of the kayak onto the rear trunk. Then lift the rear of kayak and  push it up the car and onto the roof rack. The bottom will slide up the bristles effortlessly. Same rugs will catch and clean any possible sand off the bottom of the kayak.

 

I am no Olympian and aint a young buck no more, but using this technique, I get me PA14 on and off me Passat in a jiffy, as quite a few folx here can attest

 

 

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29 mins ago, r111 said:

learn and master loading-from-the-rear technique. 

1

Some vehicles don't lend themselves to this rear loading technique.  I considered it long and hard before I spent the $$ on a Hullavator.  My 4Runner is high so the angle is bad.  More importantly, it has a big rear spoiler that would have to carry the full load during this maneuver (I don't think it would hold up over time) and the factory rack is so far forward it further complicate this.

 

The other bonus of the Hullavator people miss is that you do all the strapping while the kaya is conveniently on the side of the vehicle.   No climbing around like a monkey to strap it down.

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4 hours ago, r111 said:

learn and master loading-from-the-rear technique. 

 

Say nyet to loading from the side.

 

With sedan: a bathroom mat on the edge of rear trunk. Thicker the better, grippier the rubberish bottom the merrier. Another rug up the rear glass and onto the roof.

 

Lift the nose of the kayak onto the rear trunk. Then lift the rear of kayak and  push it up the car and onto the roof rack. The bottom will slide up the bristles effortlessly. Same rugs will catch and clean any possible sand off the bottom of the kayak.

 

I am no Olympian and aint a young buck no more, but using this technique, I get me PA14 on and off me Passat in a jiffy, as quite a few folx here can attest

 

 

I used to hit it from the back with certain vehicles but even then my shoulders felt like they would dislocate once I'd push forward.  Now I am using aero bars and there are no crossbar extender-ma-jigs like Thule, Yakima, and Rhino have to spoon it from the side.  And like I said before, I bought 3 used hullavators basically for the price of one new set so totally worth it.

4 hours ago, atv223 said:

Some vehicles don't lend themselves to this rear loading technique.  I considered it long and hard before I spent the $$ on a Hullavator.  My 4Runner is high so the angle is bad.  More importantly, it has a big rear spoiler that would have to carry the full load during this maneuver (I don't think it would hold up over time) and the factory rack is so far forward it further complicate this.

 

The other bonus of the Hullavator people miss is that you do all the strapping while the kaya is conveniently on the side of the vehicle.   No climbing around like a monkey to strap it down.

The strapping part is definitely nice, although I don't find that I can really cinch things down as hard as when I flat-topped the hulls upside down, or even on J-Racks.  Although with J-racks, you really have to hop around like a monkey, and once when my rear fender was wet, I slipped off the plastic bumper and danked my shin really bad and was like "Eff this".

 

The onyl thing I can;t get out of my head though, is that whenever I see a vehicle with hullavators attached without kayaks on, it reminds me of a motorized moose chugging along the roads.  And once I hit those pvc tubes hanging down on chains at a parking garage, so I keep the brackts on but leave the 'vators at during the work week.

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