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Drill Bit Source

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Howdy fellas :howdy:

I'm looking for 1/8 inch brad point bits for my drill press.

I've gone through a few DeWalt bits that I source at home depot. 

I find these bits to be too flexible and tend to walk unless you are 100% on line. This is driving me nuts.

I take the time to line up my drilling jig and I'm still getting more than the occasional curve-ball. 

I can see the bit flex as it's going into the wood. I use a lot of cedar, so it's not a problem with the wood being too hard. I go slowly and never put too much pressure on the bit. I rarely drill more than 2 inches to keep a good amount of the bit shaft chucked in hopes of mitigating the flex. .

 

Is anyone using something better?

Thanks 

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I've never had much luck with it. I still get wander.

I'm really leaning towards the bit quality being an issue with both methods. 

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Try Brad Point Bits.

One with chrome vanadium steel construction and ground center point to prevent drill bit from walking across material surface.

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MSC, Travers Tool and KBS Tools are some machine shop suppliers with about any drill bit you could imagine. The USA bits cost more but way better quality. I would use a stub bit to drill first then a jobber length then a extended to finish and work from both sides. The stub bit is short and won’t flex I don’t think the brad point is needed just my opinion. You can also check fastenal a bit and bolt supplier they have tools also and in most towns with a actual store you can go to. Drill hog on eBay has nice bits with lifetime warranty good luck Don

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I agree with onthefish method. I use a lathe to start and put the smaller bit in the chuck as far as it can for straightness. I also found older bits wonder and cause issues.  

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Mark,

2 things come to mind, first is to use the shorter bits to start like on the fish described, second is if you are seeing the bit flex with only light pressure on the handle, then the bit is dull. Even though we are drilling some soft stuff, the edge goes away with time. Sharpening is pretty easy, but takes a little practice to get right.

Third (OK three things) the bit should be as short as possible to get through your longest plugs, if that is 12" then a 6-1/2" drill will do it. I take the 12" bits from homies and cut them as soon as I go to use them. Shorter bit will flex less.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

You can also increase the size of the through hole to 5/32. It doesn’t sound like much of a difference but this alone will increase the stiffness of the drill, and decrease the wandering of the drill bit. 5/32” bits are readily available on e..y or a....n in various lengths. Most of the lure makers I know are using 5/32” through holes for that reason.

Edited by fishing bum wannabe

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I have found the flute length to affect wandering, the longer the flute length the greater the tendency of wandering

Edited by SC

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Exactly. This has been discussed several times over the years. I much prefer aircraft drills. Only an inch or 2 of flute length but can be bought in long lengths of the body. Way stiffer and thus way less flex and wandering.  With wood you need to relieve the chips very often so your not going to get wood chips traveling down the flutes more than an inch at best so those long fluted drills are not advantageous at all plus the rigidity of the drill is comprised. They come on long lengths and you can cut the thebidy to the length you want. 5/32 is the way to go on a lot of plugs. I also use 1/8 too. Google aircraft drills. 

8F8A408A-CD06-4E87-B02E-FE90BF39ABF8.jpeg

63CC777A-358A-41C9-A88C-D097C17BF299.jpeg

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Posted (edited) · Report post

1 hour ago, Steel Pulse said:

Exactly. This has been discussed several times over the years. I much prefer aircraft drills. Only an inch or 2 of flute length but can be bought in long lengths of the body. Way stiffer and thus way less flex and wandering.  With wood you need to relieve the chips very often so your not going to get wood chips traveling down the flutes more than an inch at best so those long fluted drills are not advantageous at all plus the rigidity of the drill is comprised. They come on long lengths and you can cut the thebidy to the length you want. 5/32 is the way to go on a lot of plugs. I also use 1/8 too. Google aircraft drills. 

8F8A408A-CD06-4E87-B02E-FE90BF39ABF8.jpeg

63CC777A-358A-41C9-A88C-D097C17BF299.jpeg

The long thicker (3/16, 1/4, etc) are referred to as "Bell Hanger" bits in the alarm industry and are readily available at alarm trade retail outlets. Be aware they are usually softer "wood" bits in those sizes and usually have a small hole near tip that would be used for attaching wires and "reversing" the wire out. Aircraft bits in those sizes are considerably more expensive, stiffer and not as common and I never saw any with the small hole as it was not needed for the intended application.

 

Edited by SC

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I went 12 for 12 today with a new bit. Definitely stiffer.

I also chucked it back to 1.5 inch for the first pass.

I make a lot of Atoms. The rounded nose makes it harder to get the hole started.

I do miss the brad point for that application, but if I take my time and enlarge my starter hole with the awl, I'm doing much better.

 

Funny how the same problems keep coming back to bite me. 

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When the same old problems stop coming back, newer, and more interesting problems will take their place, count on it.

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