ThrowinPlugs

Anchoring in 20-30ft of water?

13 posts in this topic

Hey all, I've been kayak fishing for a few years now and never really got into blackfishing. This is the year I'm doing it, and from why I gather is you're way better off anchoring up rather than drifting. Now, what is the best and safest way to anchor up in a kayak? Trolley, direct off the bow/stern? What amount of anchor line is needed due to scope?

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Posted (edited)

Definitely trolley, stern is better but not by much since togging you want your line as vertical as possible anyway. Scope should be at least 2-3 times depth, depends on your ground, rock holds better than mud at a low scope ratio. Note that's lower ratio than the 4-6x recommended for anchoring a boat, we just want not to drift, rather than ride out a storm at anchor.  You also need to rig your anchor tied to the bottom with a zip tie holding the line to the regular end, so if it hangs up you can yank and snap the tie to pull it from the bottom. Doesn't always work, I lost one last year, but it's better than nothing.

 

4772552122_3af1873421.jpg

Edited by gellfex
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Be very careful where you anchor. Ideally, you want very calm seas, and little to no current. It doesn’t take much to pull the bow or stern of a kayak under when it’s anchored, and they can also get rather tippy. Just use your head out there. 

 

As for scooe, I’ve attached 3’ of lightweight chain directly to the anchor and then tied my line to the chain. With chain, you can get away with a lot less scope. I usually just throw an extra 10’ of line over and I’m good to go. 

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This probably won't apply as much to you northern guys (Florida here)...but I figured I'd chime in anyway with the reminder that a quick release is NEVER a bad idea either. Anchor rope --> small boat fender ---> 2-3ft rope ---> carabiner clip ---> to kayak.

 

if ya ever get into something unexpected (big fish, conditions), you can always detach, fight/let the fish do the work & swing around to get her later. We do this religiously now when going for tarpon/shark/etc.

 

i learned the hard way after losing an entire spool of braid in one go...to the knot--twice.

 

not to mention, if you DO get something special on the line, the LAST thing you wanna try pulling off is mucking around with an anchor one-handed. I tried--never a pretty sight.

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Definitely a trolley. Also a quick release system with buoy - if its getting hairy and you need cut lose this means you can retrieve your anchor. At least 3 times the depth and also chain. 

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Posted (edited)

 On Amazon:

 

#1 SeaSense 5lb Navy Painted Anchor (this one should never ever get stuck, but it probably will still)
#2 Shoreline Marine Solid Braid Anchor Line, 3/16-Inch x 75-Feet (absolute gem, comes with a giant stainless carabiner  + rope management !). Attach a section of pool noodle or some other float to it.

#3 Shoreline Marine Propel Zig-Zag Cleat - Black

 

Trolley not a must IMO. 

 

On my PA14, when anchoring, I route the line behind one of the rear rod holders, to anchor (kind of) from the rear and around one of front rod holders for the front anchoring.

 

This way you get to see whats coming, which helps IMO, as opposed to anchor being completely behind you.

 

I have anchored in some hairy setups and this held up fine.

 

Read up other posts of safety. Chief thing here is to be able  to disconnect from the anchor line in a hurry, if need arises. With cleat, takes few seconds. With trolly arrangement - much longer, so you might have to cut the line.

 

Manage the line so you dont have 20' of loose  line all over the deck - the line management spool in #2 is really nice.

 

Some finer points:

 

- you could anchor over a killer killer I sez tog spot and have 2 hrs of fantastikal fishing.  And then you wanna visit nearby island for quick relief and/or to get more crabs. Untie the line, throw the thing (#2 in the list above) overboard and let it float (assumes you do attach some kind of float to it). Come back, retrieve, retie and you're right back over the same spot. Priceless

 

- to get the anchor back, sometimes you have to come up on different sides of anchor and/or pull hard to get it to dislodge. Still, you could loose one, but at these prices, no big loss.

 

- you could mark 20' spots on the line ... use some kind of die/paint - this way you'd kind of know how much line you got out

 

- with not too much wind and/or tidal current, you dont really need to get 3xdepth of line out. 2x or even 1.5 would work fine.

 

- to see if anchor is holding, form an  "aiming" line from a distant stationary point to another one. Say aim at a water tower through a section of a bridge. Keep checking and if the tower has "moved", you know you're moving and anchor is not holding

Edited by r111

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Keep it simple. I personally tie a length of paracord between my mid-ship handle and the bow or stern handle. Then I clip my anchor line to that line and let it slide forward or backwards when you drop anchor. I have one of those 3lb claw anchors and I use a 100' line I got at West Marine. Nothing fancy. To lock the line at the desired length, I have another carabiner I got at walmart or home depot that has a slot with teeth on one end. It acts like a quick release when you wedge the line in the teeth. If you are going to anchor in rocks, use a wire tie like the boat guys do. Tie the line to the claw end of the anchor and then run the line near the other end and wire tie it there. Then you can pull against the wire tie until it breaks if you get the claw stuck in the rocks. It may allow you to free the anchor.

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Thanks for all the input! I learned a lot already. I'm thinking a trolley may be in my short future. 

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1 hour ago, ThrowinPlugs said:

Thanks for all the input! I learned a lot already. I'm thinking a trolley may be in my short future. 

This may be a YMMV, but I just use $1 mini-carabiners not expensive stainless pulleys. Work fine. On 2 of my boats they're just clipped to the bow and stern loops. Zigzag cleats rock however. I added one to the track just behind the rocket launcher. That's my anchor in the blue bag, but I've since made a reel filled with 200' of paracord. The length is not really for fishing but for emergency anchoring if I had a problem in deep water and didn't want to be swept out to sea. There's serious currents up here.

 

596132ed404fb_DSCF2967_modified_thjaws.jpg.6b7a2605bf0c1e0b119d79d96bb94fef.jpg.

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22 mins ago, dbjpb said:

Nice looking ride John.

 

Haha. I think I'm karmically doomed to only have yellow boats. Like 3/4 of the boats I've ever owned, all of them used, have been yellow.

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It’s worth learning from the war stories of other anglers when comes to anchoring. When it goes wrong it can happen quickly and there are plenty of examples when these situations were preventable.

A common one is poorly thought out trolleys jamming. Another is poor routine for setting and recovering the anchor.

Always have a knife or cutter in you as a plan B and know your tides and currents. 

Edited by JRT
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11 hours ago, JRT said:

It’s worth learning from the war stories of other anglers when comes to anchoring. When it goes wrong it can happen quickly and there are plenty of examples when these situations were preventable.

A common one is poorly thought out trolleys jamming. Another is poor routine for setting and recovering the anchor.

Always have a knife or cutter in you as a plan B and know your tides and currents. 

I can see both being an issue, but since you seem to have specific incidents in mind, do you care to elaborate on what are do's and don'ts?  I think the only problem I've experienced was from not cleating the trolley and it slipping towards the middle of the boat sending the boat sideways to the current.

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