night owl

Major boat crash in the canal last night

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49 posts in this topic

13 hours ago, R.R. Bridge Fisher said:

On the news it said cop stripped down jumped in and swam to rescue. That's crazy! Guy is a hero

 

1 hour ago, richie c said:

The 2 guys treading water were lucky to have had a cop nearby who heard them screaming and took action.

 

^^^^^^^ Amen to that.  Kudos to that officer. 

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2 hours ago, blacklabnh said:

glad no one got hurt. All cans should have a light on them.

 

Yes...........and all boaters should monitor their chart plotters and pay attention to where they are going, especially on a very dark night.  There's no excuse for hitting a navagation bouy.

rbart likes this

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On 10/9/2018 at 7:31 PM, Seadogg said:

Accidents happen I suppose, but the chart plotter doesn’t lie. Simply paying attention to that piece of equipment prevents incidents like this. Not saying this was the case here, but so many people have electronics they can’t operate or interpret worth a damn. I just don’t get it. 

:agree:

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Posted (edited) · Report post

On 10/9/2018 at 7:31 PM, Seadogg said:

Accidents happen I suppose, but the chart plotter doesn’t lie. Simply paying attention to that piece of equipment prevents incidents like this. Not saying this was the case here, but so many people have electronics they can’t operate or interpret worth a damn. I just don’t get it. 

 

Not necessarily true...bouys arent always where they appear on the chart.  Also plenty of guys down here in NJ have found themselves up on dry sand coming around Sandy Hook at night relying too much on their plotters.

 

Just gotta be super aware at night.  Accidents do happen.

Edited by bbfish

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11 mins ago, bbfish said:

 

Not necessarily true...bouys arent always where they appear on the chart.  Also plenty of guys down here in NJ have found themselves up on dry sand coming around Sandy Hook at night relying too much on their plotters.

You’re right, buoys aren’t always exactly where they appear on the chart, and the same goes with shifting sandbars. Rather than tempt fate though, set a course that provides a wide margin of error and practice safe speed. You won’t find yourself having too many accidents. 

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On 10/9/2018 at 3:59 PM, BrianBM said:

Ouch .... could've been a lot worse.

 

You have to wonder ... too much speed for the visibility?  That hull is certainly big enough for radar. 

The bouy is lit as well...and would be marked on a chart plotter

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Well.  

 

This is the kind of story that leads me back to my own notions of an ideal boat.  A center console, with enough of a top for a radar, and a trainable searchlight, and enough console space for a big multifunctional display for the chart plotter and the radar and a separate battery for the instrumentation in case a problem happens with one of generators on an outboard (assuming an outboard).

 

Maybe an aluminum hull. A lot harder to mar then a nice gelcoat on glass. So it's harder to paint aluminum, so what?

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29 mins ago, BrianBM said:

Well.  

 

This is the kind of story that leads me back to my own notions of an ideal boat.  A center console, with enough of a top for a radar, and a trainable searchlight, and enough console space for a big multifunctional display for the chart plotter and the radar and a separate battery for the instrumentation in case a problem happens with one of generators on an outboard (assuming an outboard).

 

Maybe an aluminum hull. A lot harder to mar then a nice gelcoat on glass. So it's harder to paint aluminum, so what?

Yea... Buying an aluminum boat in an effort to avoid damage is, pardon my French, an ass-backwards approach. Your best defense are your eyes and ears, along with an ability to properly interpret a chart plotter and/or radar. If you’re unsure, slow down as much as necessary. I’m on the water daily, day and night, fog, rain, whatever, going wherever customers need me. There’s no such thing as routine in my line of work, and yet, I’ve never had an accident. Not saying I never will, but if that day comes and I could have avoided it, I’m taking responsibility. I don’t possess some superhuman skill, I just pay attention. That’s it. 

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