Belmo

Hurricane Hysteria Thread: Matthew

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14 mins ago, MikeMc said:

Looks like all those houses that are raised survived, for the most part. 

I noticed that too. The surge go under them? Or are houses built on slabs not secured well?

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1 min ago, ByronPA said:

I noticed that too. The surge go under them? Or are houses built on slabs not secured well?

surge goes under them and they are built to newer codes...

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31 mins ago, MikeMc said:

Looks like all those houses that are raised survived, for the most part. 

Yeah that's a big part of it. Also, the newest construction was likely reinforced with xtra-sturdy hurricane clips or similar preventative measures to combat roof and wall failure.

 

What's amazing to me is the degree of 'wind-only' damage, (besides the expected trashing they got from battering waves on top of storm surge) Just dont see that too often, given that most hurricanes land with wind below 120, and construction techniques can generally withstand that pretty well.

 

Once structures begin to break up in 130-155 mph winds though, the debris becomes javelins and projectiles that smash into other structures down stream. Seen a lot of roof failures in this storm. Once the windows get breached, the wind gets inside the structure and then roofs go for a dorothy and toto ride pretty quickly after that

 

Lastly, "survived" may be a relative term. Imo, it's likely a fair majority of those structures which did survive (in a visual sense) end up getting torn down anyway because of structural damage and failures and water innundation that are not visible from high up in a helicopter 

Edited by rst3

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3 hours ago, ByronPA said:

I noticed that too. The surge go under them? Or are houses built on slabs not secured well?

They are built on pilings driven deep into the ground - some companies even use pilings with a helical twist like a giant screw. There’s no foundation to get destroyed - no concrete block. The walls are designed to break away so the water can move freely under the house. Make sense if you are building where waves are going to be banging against your walls one day :)

 

Those house will need much less work to repair...the home built on slabs are the ones that have been erased.

 

TimS

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If you've ever wondered what high end Cat 4 wind speeds.. in the eyewall.. of a landfalling hurricane on the coast looks like, well here you go.

 

Mark Suddith secures(bolts??) cameras to structures in the main impact zones of hurricanes. This shows classic eyewall whiteout and *extreme wind speeds* near 150mph.

 

My alcoholic clown friend who once swan-dove a firepit, looked at me soberly the one time I showed him similar video many years ago. Said: "it looks like 4 Horsemen of the Apocalypse will ride down the street at any moment"

 

> It's the best description of the eyewall I've ever heard.

 

Of note: although the surge DOES come in, its not off the chain nutso. At least not in this camera location (likely on a hill) and not compared to some other strong cyclones that have hit the US.

The unique 'deepwater' inshore coastal geography likely factored in to the lower surge seem here:

 

I

Edited by rst3

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22 hours ago, Belmo said:


What a terrible way to die. And all because you didn't want to drive 3 hours inland. What a waste.

Bumper to bumper 5mph evacuation, gas stations running out of gas, hotels to convenience stores are price gouging, no re-entry for any level of damage. Wildly over dramatized forecasts. Anybody that has ever evacuated once would probably stay after that.

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3 mins ago, Dave588 said:

Bumper to bumper 5mph evacuation, gas stations running out of gas, hotels to convenience stores are price gouging, no re-entry for any level of damage. Wildly over dramatized forecasts. Anybody that has ever evacuated once would probably stay after that.

Your right: drowning in a storm surge is way better than having to deal with those minor inconveniences.

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20 hours ago, ted527 said:

When the flood insurance on a little POS shore shack on a lagoon went from $1500 to over $5000 after sandy i said eff it and paid off the mortgage. All the value in this property is the waterfront lot and a flood won’t damage that.

Mine was paid off. I paid for 18 years with no claim. The cost doubled. I told them to cancel it. 

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I think this one was under-reported on purpose. Recent history has people not heeding the warnings so they wanted to get a bad one going to use as an example. That, or they wanted a lot of devastation to increase viewership. Either way, Fla. is a nice place to vacation, bit I could never live there.

 

definition of “they”: Govenrment Authorities and media linked to said authorities. 

Edited by aae0130

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23 mins ago, aae0130 said:

I think this one was under-reported on purpose. Recent history has people not heeding the warnings so they wanted to get a bad one going to use as an example. That, or they wanted a lot of devastation to increase viewership. Either way, Fla. is a nice place to vacation, bit I could never live there.

 

definition of “they”: Govenrment Authorities and media linked to said authorities. 

 

videoblocks-ugly-man-tin-foil-hat-conspi

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1 hour ago, Belmo said:

Your right: drowning in a storm surge is way better than having to deal with those minor inconveniences.

You get same forecast 6 times a year with no damage. You evacuate multiple times, usually into the storms path, with no damage. What would make anyone think that this one is going to be any different?

Storm was pretty short notice. when storm escalated, there was no time and shelter in place orders were given. Nobody is going to put their kids in car and try to outrun storm.

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9 hours ago, rst3 said:

If you've ever wondered what high end Cat 4 wind speeds.. in the eyewall.. of a landfalling hurricane on the coast looks like, well here you go.

 

Mark Suddith secures(bolts??) cameras to structures in the main impact zones of hurricanes. This shows classic eyewall whiteout and *extreme wind speeds* near 150mph.

 

My alcoholic clown friend who once swan-dove a firepit, looked at me soberly the one time I showed him similar video many years ago. Said: "it looks like 4 Horsemen of the Apocalypse will ride down the street at any moment"

 

> It's the best description of the eyewall I've ever heard.

 

Of note: although the surge DOES come in, its not off the chain nutso. At least not in this camera location (likely on a hill) and not compared to some other strong cyclones that have hit the US.

The unique 'deepwater' inshore coastal geography likely factored in to the lower surge seem here:

 

I

Amazing footage...terrifying ****...I’ve seen the beach in 90 mph winds - while a mess the water/sand didn’t have the same characteristics shown in that video. At 90 the waves still roll in and out - in that video the water doesn’t just stay in it pushes forward and piles vertically against stuff. That’s frightening and devastating. Water is heavy - it moves stuff, it crushes stuff. That video gives

me chills.

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