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CcCstriper89

Bird Watchers Hawk ID

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FFF07EDC-6B61-4614-8B92-ED79771FA666.png.cc8f9b540bc7e5b2665a355b22ab82f7.png0A347F86-CEC2-429B-936B-1DAB52984E82.png.a75cca34ecd7465b9eec72f0c980a549.pngFound this dead hawk today about the size of a mourning dove. Thinking maybe sharp-shinned hawk after google searching. Can anybody confirm this? I was out scouting for hunting season and stumbled upon it. No sign of being hurt.

Edited by CcCstriper89

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Kestrels fit the size class but it doesn't look like a kestrel. I'd go with sharp shinned. Don't know much about Coopers, never seen one.

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12 hours ago, Plug and teaser said:

Sharp-shinned looks right to me.

yep, its an immature sharp-shinned hawk. skinny shins, squared off tail (you can see all the the tail feathers are the same length) and the blurry brown streaks on the breast (cooper's has thinner and darker streaks).

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Sharp shinned. Size of a mourning dove is clincher.

 

Any idea why it died?

Bunch of sick or dead birds turning up lately. Possibly west nile.

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Sharpies are amazing.  I've seen them chase birds around my feeder several times.  They are incredibly maneuverable.

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17 mins ago, buz23 said:

Sharpies are amazing.  I've seen them chase birds around my feeder several times.  They are incredibly maneuverable.

:th:  Watched this guy hunt a friends feeder a couple winters ago.

 

He would just sit 15 ft. or so above the feeder and wait. The birds knew he was there, but hunger got the best of them after a while and they came back.......

 

Sharpie.jpg.f469f0c10d15836be9f3fa1021638d88.jpg

 

 

 

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Sharpshin definitely.  Too small for a Cooper's hawk, too chunky for a kestrel, and lacking the red and blue hues.

 

West Nile, quite possible. That West Nile kills lots of relatively tough birds, including crows and red-tailed hawks. It wouldn't astonish me if it killed off a species that was on the edge of extinction anyway, from habitat loss or other causes; you need a good population for a new disease to sort through it and kill off the most vulnerable. 

 

I've never seen a bluebird. When I am rich, and have an acre or so, a biologist and landscape gardener will design a large garden designed to attract them. 

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