bob_G

More seal/GW food for thought

21 posts in this topic

Read an article in the MV Times about seals expanding their range. Apparently a small group of gray and harbor seals have colonized Gull Island. Gull Island is a small island just off the Penekese Islands. Seals never inhabited this tiny island in Buzzards Bay until recently. They also are being to hang around Cuttyhunk.  I guess this would explain GW sightings in Buzzards Bay.

I used to commercial lobster in and around the Penekese, and right up to Cuttyhunk and Nashawena years ago, and I never saw a seal during that time. Two nights ago I had what appeared to be a gray seal in search of food not 50' from me. Huge animal, grunting and snorting the entire time. This used to be a rare occurance. I can't imagine how Buzzards Bay would change if seals began to colonize interior areas such as Falmouth, Bourne and Wareham? There are certainly prime areas for them to set up shop is they ever decided.

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Posted (edited)

If you look on Google Earth you can see them.   pic taken  2/26/2018   

Edited by FizzyFish

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4 hours ago, FizzyFish said:

If you look on Google Earth you can see them.   pic taken  2/26/2018   

They have been around B. Bay waters for a long time in the winter but now they are starting to hang out in buzzards during the warm weather months

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Posted (edited)

8 hours ago, robc22 said:

They have been around B. Bay waters for a long time in the winter but now they are starting to hang out in buzzards during the warm weather months

If you look at a chart you’ll see the end of Scraggy Neck has an area called ‘seal rocks’. The huge grey seals come down from the north every winter and haul out on the big flat rocks out there. 

Edited by bradW

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18 hours ago, bob_G said:

Read an article in the MV Times about seals expanding their range. Apparently a small group of gray and harbor seals have colonized Gull Island. Gull Island is a small island just off the Penekese Islands. Seals never inhabited this tiny island in Buzzards Bay until recently. They also are being to hang around Cuttyhunk.  I guess this would explain GW sightings in Buzzards Bay.

I used to commercial lobster in and around the Penekese, and right up to Cuttyhunk and Nashawena years ago, and I never saw a seal during that time. Two nights ago I had what appeared to be a gray seal in search of food not 50' from me. Huge animal, grunting and snorting the entire time. This used to be a rare occurance. I can't imagine how Buzzards Bay would change if seals began to colonize interior areas such as Falmouth, Bourne and Wareham? There are certainly prime areas for them to set up shop is they ever decided.

imagine them down in the mud flats?

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34 mins ago, gray gables said:

imagine them down in the mud flats?

That's what I'm afraid of. Even the Mashnee Dike.

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1 hour ago, bradW said:

If you look at a chart you’ll see the end of Scraggy Neck has an area called ‘seal rocks’. The huge grey seals come down from the north every winter and haul out on the big flat rocks out there. 

There's another set of seal rocks right across the bay in Marion. Just outside Sippican harbour. They like all of upper B.bay in the winter. I would see them grubbing for blackbacks at the hayfield or up in buttermilk.

 

5ba63fab92858_ExploringRedBrookHarborMassachusetts.png.e22872498b0e1247207d46385a3a72d8.png

 

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If you can find yourself some halfbeaks, there's no reason to buy ballyhoo. A slob was caught last week on the troll, with rigged halfbeaks.

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3 hours ago, patchyfog said:

If you can find yourself some halfbeaks, there's no reason to buy ballyhoo. A slob was caught last week on the troll, with rigged halfbeaks.

Think you got wrong thread...

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How are those wealthy waterfront home owners along Nyes and Scraggy Necks gonna deal with seals as neighbors

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These critters really got in the heads of many of you.

 

Think about this:

There are 3 major breeding colonies in Canada. 

There are at least 4 islands in Maine where they breed.

Obviously everyone knows about the Cape.

 

So my point is, there are hundreds and hundreds of miles of coast included in that group.

Why haven't they run off the rich people in Maine or Canada?

Why haven't they colonized each and every point or bar and eaten all the fish and polluted all the water north of here?

 

They haven't. And they won't to the south either. Human population grows as you go south. They may attempt to colonize some remote islands but now you're into the heart of whitey country. 

White shark nursery recently discovered off New York.

 

Nature out of balance is the rally cry for cull.

I think in the next few years more signs will show of nature rebalancing without help.

Sucks for those bitten already and any future victims, but I think Jaws gonna do your culling for you.

He doesn't have to eat them all. It's the ones that run back to Canada that will make the difference. In my nutty opinion. 

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A pity Great Whites reproduce so much more slowly then seals.  

 

In another thread, another poster - Popasilov? - notes that while there are a few orcas in the NW Atlantic that seem to specialize in eating marine mammals, they rarely come south of Nova Scotia.  That's a pity, both for surfcasters and for the tourist industry.

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