Drew C.

Fatal shark attack - Mass

188 posts in this topic

9 mins ago, CWitek said:

I don't disagree.

 

If seal harvest can be done in a sustainable manner, that maintains the animal's role in the ecosystem, I'd be all for it.  I'm a hunter, and I enjoy killing my own meat.  I have no objection to the regulated harvest of an animal, so long as the animal is utilized after it is killed

:hi5:

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By some estimates there are 250,000 seals on the Cape.  I've seen the youtube videos of the flyovers for miles and miles, with tens of thousand on them on Monomoy alone.  I understand the calls for seal culling, but I really don't see this happening in reality.  There is federal law protecting them.  And how many is enough to kill?  You'd have to napalm them on the beaches to make any kind of dent in the population.  The general public is not going to stand for people with clubs chasing them and killing them.  And how many seals culled is enough to lessen the shark presence?  50,000?  100,000? It's just not going to happen in today's environment.  You start bloodying the waters with seal blood and you will have every white shark on the east coast on the beaches.  It's a pipe dream.  Killing seals isn't going to happen.

So that leaves killing of the sharks.  Could be implemented as a possible solution for claims of "nuisance sharks" as they would be called by the state that are found close to shore.    But again, you are talking about a federally protected species and a lot of people that aren't going to stand for sharks being killed.  They did it in Australia for decades, until the population protested against it enough to have them change their laws.

Only real solution in today's world to mitigate (not 100% prevent mind you) attacks is following Australia's lead of swimming nets at select beaches, smart drum lines, and patrols for a better warning system. 

Gotta buck up, get the tourists back, or be on welfare all winter... as it's been said. 

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Posted (edited)

Napalm would ruin they're coat...:dismay:

 

Edited by Lou T

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Apparently there was a bill passed in NW States to cull sea lions, so maybe we have a chance in MA?

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27 mins ago, bido said:

Gotta buck up, get the tourists back, or be on welfare all winter... as it's been said. 

I doubt the cape business will hurt much- maybe only get better with more whites around.  They just can't close the beaches.  There are signs of whites everywhere.  Maybe you deploy some spotter planes a few times a day, put up nets in strategic locations, and try to keep track of these things to the best of your ability- but bottom line is swim at your own risk. It's silly to close the beaches.  

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16 hours ago, meccalli said:

That's actually what I was asking about. What's the control for too much people? They're far more out of balance. You're more likely to catch a bullet, get stabbed, blown up, mowed down, carwrecked, catch disease etc etc. All the risks of being around other people. I thought shark avoidance is pretty simple, it's not like they walk on land and last time I checked, I don't have fins or gills. If you were living in Australia, what would be the solution for box jellyfish or irukandji? 

:agree:

Spot on, although probably the dissenting opinion here, it needed to be said.. People dont want go hear this though.. somehow we feel entitled to over populate the planet and crush other ecosystems in our wake... 

 

The ocean is the sharks home, not ours.  If your uncomfortable with the risks of entering into an environment you are not in control of, then stay out of the ocean, it's that simple... that's what swimming pools are for.. I'm sorry for the loss this family suffered but this is nature at its finest.. predator and prey.. just because we like to swim and fish and surf does not make it our right to rid the ocean of anything that may harm us while we do these activities...

 

My brother had 2 very close calls with a GW's off of MTK just a few weeks ago.. we are very thankful that no one was hurt but even he said it's in no way the sharks fault. We are intruders in their turf, not the other way around..

 

I surf fish at night and I do frequently wade out pretty deep.. I'm aware that I'm taking a risk and accept that.. my buddy has warned me several times to stay in more shallow water because sharks have been so prevalent this season where we fish.. I say if this is how I go then at least I go doing what I love.... 

 

2 hours ago, CWitek said:

 

An ecosystem is, by definition, a system of interrelated parts, which functions best when all parts are present.

 

Pioneering ecologist Aldo Leopold captured the concept well in this quote:

 

“The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant, “What good is it?” If the land mechanism as a whole is good, then every part is good, whether we understand it or not. If the biota, in the course of aeons, has built something we like but do not understand, then who but a fool would discard seemingly useless parts? To keep every cog and wheel is the first precaution of intelligent tinkering.”

people seem to forget our place is in this ecosystem and not elevated above it by some means... we are meant to be part of it, not its creators and managers.. we like to just "correct" the issues we perceive with the world around us in an effort to make our lives easier. However, in doing so, many times we have created far more issues....

 

The shark was being a shark.. it's intended nature through evolutionary design is to hunt the oceans... people, on the other hand, are not sea creatures.. without fins or gills our nature does not dictate a life in the sea but rather one on land.. because we have the ability to swim does not make the ocean our home... a sense of entitlement to enjoy a beach day does not change this... 

 

 

I'm reading a lot of "cull the seals" and "hunt the sharks"... how about stay out of the ocean if your not accepting of the risks... enjoy your beach day from the sand or splashing in a tidal pool.. 

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16 hours ago, BrianBM said:

 

Glennsave's post brings up something I wanted to know too.  What's the state of the art in shark repellent? Is there any?  A Red Sea flatfish called the Moses sole was the subject of research at one time. Sharks won't bite them, presumably due to something they secrete, but I don't know if anyone managed to make a commercially viable and practical product of it. 

Lots of tech out there for repellent purposes.. how effective it is remains to be seen..

I saw something on Discovery channel (I think) a while back where researchers were testing a repellant made from a secreation released by dead decaying sharks.. was pretty interesting to watch and a quick Google will likely bring up the video I saw of it being tested in a feeding frenzy.. was really something to see... 

 

Lots of other measures available too:

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1 hour ago, Reed422 said:

Apparently there was a bill passed in NW States to cull sea lions, so maybe we have a chance in MA?

That was an endangered species issue, with the possibility of at least one run--I think it was Willamette River steelhead--running the risk of extinction within the next decade if predation continues at current levels.

 

No similar issue here.  No endangered species are being impacted.  If anything, the seals are a sign of an ecosystem restoring itself, with traditional prey animals, missing for more than a century, returning to the beaches and nearshore ocean, where they're hunted by predators that are returning to past levels of abundance in the coastal sea..

 

 

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You can damn well believe that when the Native Americans hunted and gathered along the shoreline, and from the artifact record they spent a lot of time there, the seal population was held in check.  There was no overpopulation of seals then.  

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2 hours ago, Fly By Nite said:

I doubt the cape business will hurt much- maybe only get better with more whites around.  They just can't close the beaches.  There are signs of whites everywhere.  Maybe you deploy some spotter planes a few times a day, put up nets in strategic locations, and try to keep track of these things to the best of your ability- but bottom line is swim at your own risk. It's silly to close the beaches.  

 

The Cape tourism industry is doing just fine in spite of the sharks & seals.  The new thrill is to come to the cape to see the seals and hopefully see a Great White.  

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19 hours ago, SwimBait said:

Surfing on the Cape in a black wetsuit and fins is like wandering around an African savanah with meat steaks in your back pocket.

 

So no "Lady Gaga meat jackets" while on safari...got it!

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1 hour ago, CWitek said:

....No similar issue here.  No endangered species are being impacted.  If anything, the seals are a sign of an ecosystem restoring itself, with traditional prey animals, missing for more than a century, returning to the beaches and nearshore ocean, where they're hunted by predators that are returning to past levels of abundance in the coastal sea..

 

 

Actually they are causing problems for the entire coastal ecosystem.

They are here because they found food sources they could exploit, beaches that could take over, and nothing to disturb either.

Then the sharks happened upon the seal colony and they found the same conditions, only from the water!

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3 hours ago, Reed422 said:

Apparently there was a bill passed in NW States to cull sea lions, so maybe we have a chance in MA?

Apparently you got that wrong. No bill passed by any state can trump (pun intended) the Federal marine mammal protection act. What happened out west is that two states (WA & OR) petitioned the USF&WS to allow the lethal removal of several sea lions which were eating a type of steelhead that is on the endangered species list. 

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