Seal

If you have elderly relatives or neighbors, please warn them about the "Grandparent scam"

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Woman loses $1,000 to 'grandparent' scam in Hingham

HINGHAM, Mass. —
Police say a woman lost $1,000 after a phone scammer posing as her grandson claimed he was in jail and needed the money for bail.

The Patriot Ledger reports police said the 85-year-old woman told officers she’d received several calls from someone who identified themselves using her grandson’s first name and said they’d been arrested after fleeing the scene of a car crash. The caller asked the woman to purchase two $500 Visa gift cards and said he would call her back.

 

A woman claiming to be the lawyer of the grandson came on the phone and said the grandson needed the money immediately because he was due to appear in court in three hours.

The Hingham woman purchased the gift cards at Walmart and then read the numbers on the cards to him when he called back.

 

The scammer then asked the woman to buy $900 more in gift cards. She went to her bank to withdraw cash to buy the cards, but the teller told her that she was probably being scammed.

The woman called her credit card provider as well as Visa, but the cards had already been used.

 

This kind of ploy, known as the grandparent scam, has become popular among phone scammers in recent years and has been reported frequently to police on the South Shore. Police say many victims do not come forward out of embarrassment or fear of losing their independence.

 

In a typical scam, police say the scammer will often claim their voice sounds different because they were in an accident or have been crying. The scammer may not use a first name until the grandparent says it first during the conversation. They may also search online for the names of relatives. The scammers will also ask the grandparents not to tell anyone, including their parents, in order to keep family members from learning about the scam.

 

 

 

Some prick tried this scam on my 90 year old Grandfather and had him in hysterics, thinking my cousin was in jail...

Old people don't understand the internet, so just the fact that the scammer knows the names of family members can convince them that the story is true, regardless of how stupid the story is.

 

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My mom wasn't fooled, not for one second, and called em everything but white and christians.

Said she was so pissed off, when she got off the phone she needed two glasses of vermouth to calm down.

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They tried this with my father (They probably confused him for me. Same name) about my grandson. He laughed at them and told them let him go to jail. :laugh:

Edited by bospa357

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1 hour ago, woodbutcher said:

My mom wasn't fooled, not for one second, and called em everything but white and christians.

Said she was so pissed off, when she got off the phone she needed two glasses of vermouth to calm down.

:laugh:

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 This happened to my grandfather about five or six years ago. He had a feeling something wasn’t right so he called my dad. I googled it and apparently it was a common scam at that time as well.

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3 hours ago, Seal said:

 

 

 

Some prick tried this scam on my 90 year old Grandfather and had him in hysterics, thinking my cousin was in jail...

Old people don't understand the internet, so just the fact that the scammer knows the names of family members can convince them that the story is true, regardless of how stupid the story is.

 

My parents got that scam call about a month ago. They're 96+97, and the story seemed to match up with my son Mike. It flipped them out, so they call me, and I end up calling Mike. They don't really known how to deal with even small problems anymore, and possibly they might've become victims.

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They got $800 from my mom.

Said my son was in jail in Atlanta, and he didn't want me or his mom to know.

Had her go to a Western Union to send the money to New York.

By the time I found out, after the money was picked up, it was too late to get the money back.

She called the cops, and the next day they came over to interview her, and they called back to get more money.

Mom handed the phone to the cop, he IDed himself, and click.

Tried to call the caller ID number, and the phone was dead that fast.

They were slick. When mom said that the guy on the phone didn't sound like my son, he said it was because he got beat up, and had a busted mouth and nose. he even used the name my son calls my mom.

I think they got the info from FB.

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3 hours ago, patchyfog said:

My parents got that scam call about a month ago. They're 96+97, and the story seemed to match up with my son Mike. It flipped them out, so they call me, and I end up calling Mike. They don't really known how to deal with even small problems anymore, and possibly they might've become victims.

God bless them Patchy! 

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It must be a New England thing because my buddy and I were out fishing on my boat in CT waters when he got a call saying that his brother had been in an accident and that they had him hostage in Stamford at gunpoint and wanted $1K to let him go. 

 

At first we thought it was legit as this guy’s brother was the type that would get into these types of predicaments (trying to be nice here).

 

When they called back 30 mins later, we told them to just shoot him, and we kept on fishing.

 

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