Beachglass Guru

Fluke on the spoon?

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I posted this as a comment in another thread on metals I've been following, but thought maybe it deserved it's own thread.. I'm interested in hearing if anyone else has been doing this with success..

 

20180831_152851.jpg.a9a525b8844c808056805a02bc8484c7.jpg

 

These two flutter spoons are made by Run-off Lures. They weigh 1.25oz and 2oz.. I keep them with me mainly for late summer daytime bass fishing (I'll discuss this in a moment), but have only recently discovered another interesting use...

On a recent trip to a local inlet I learned by chance that these spoons are absolutely deadly for fluke...

 

My intended target for the trip was trigger fish that I regularly pick up on a groundsweeper jig tipped with clam. They are around in great numbers at a local inlet but only during the last hour of the flood tide and through slack tide. As the tide begins to ebb, the school typically moves out to structure a little further off shore.. 

 

 

When the tide flipped and the bite shut off, instead of packing up my catch and heading home, I decided to stick around and see if I could tease up some bass on this sunny beautiful afternoon.. this is a technique I adopted a few years ago around this time and have found INCREDIBLY effective at getting daytime bass to bite. Mid August water temps have the majority of the bass off in deeper waters, and the inshore and back bay bass bite is very difficult at times.. however, I know from diving these waters for many years that big bass are still around and most are sitting tight to rock structure or resting in holes along the bottom of the inlet.. when this time of year comes around, and I see snappers flood our inshore waters, I know it's time to break out the spoons.

 

This technique has been successful with bass both from the boat and also from shore/jetti..

On this afternoon I was standing on the jetti (in this case the east jetti of a south shore inlet) I cast hard out into the inlet in the direction the tide is coming FROM (so if it's an outgoing tide I'm casting inshore, up current, in this case to my right). I let the spoon land and sink to the bottom before securing my line on the roller. Then, without reeling to retrieve, I snap the tip of the rod up gently, just enough to lift the spoon slightly off the bottom. The ripping current then catches it and causes it to flutter several yards in the direction of the flow (in this case left). I repeat this snap and flutter and watch my line as the current takes the spoon along the inlet floor.. as the spoon makes it's way bouncing along the bottom you would be surprised how frequently it catches the attention of a lazy bass that's been just laying in a hole.. my suspiscion is that what makes this lure so effective at this time of year is snappers. I feel the spoon when, worked correctly, can closely resemble these small august snapper blues.. these little blues in such abundance in the water are surely being picked up as a meal by big bass.. 

 

Now... it's no secret that snappers are a favorite bait for fluke. Surf guys have been rigging them up for late summer flatties for as long as I can remember.. but it had never crossed my mind to try a spoon. On this afternoon while casting for bass I happened to find ONLY fluke.. one cast after another was taken by hungry fluke as opposed to the bass I was searching for.. almost amazed by the success, I kept at it... fish after fish the spoon kept catching.. when I went home that evening I had a nice bunch of triggers on ice, and also, much to my suprise, my limit of very decent sized fluke.. 

Curious if it was just a fluke (pun intended), I had to test it out again... so, on no less than a dozen subsequent trips I have tried the same thing and found that while I do still pull the occasional mid-day bass, the fluke seem much more eager to inhale this spoon as it makes it's way along the bottom.. 

 

 

 

Anyone else tried this or doing this with any regularity and success?

 

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I've caught flounder on Krocodile & Tony Accetta spoons in the inland waterway & at inlets in NC & SC. The spoons I've used are not as heavy, as the water depth & currents are not like you seem to be encountering. Size 15 Tony's are great for casting and don't snag over sandy or muddy bottoms, and the Krocs in the 1/2 oz to 1 weight range are great for casting in a heavier current. I remove the trebles if they come with them, and replace them with a sparsely dressed single. 

Edited by tidewaterfly

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when I used to fish for fluke directly I casted a cheap K-mart chrome spoon for them and bass.

not in any current but,on the beach.

also caught sandflats as well.

another lure I did well with was the old style rebel I think they were 5 inches long and the sinking ones casted better\farther and caught better too.

yes,the spoon is a great lure to get fluke to hit solidly.

your inlet tech is a solid one so,you stay on it!

HH

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2 mins ago, tidewaterfly said:

I've caught flounder on Krocodile & Tony Accetta spoons in the inland water & at inlets in NC & SC. The spoons I've used are not as heavy, as the water depth & currents are not like you seem to be encountering. Size 15 Tony's are great for casting and don't snag over sandy or muddy bottoms, and the Krocs in the 1/2 oz to 1 weight range are great for casting in a heavier current. I remove the trebles if they come with them, and replace them with a sparsely dressed single. 

It's funny u mention the krocodile lure as that is what I was using when I learned the technique for bass a few seasons back.. as you said, I am dealing with a pretty stiff rip so I opted for a slightly heavier spoon and found these not only cast MUCH BETTER, but their specific action has attracted a lot more attention than my krocs ever did.. not sure what accounts for the difference as it's only a slight weight difference between a 1oz kroc and a 1.25oz run-off.. possibly body shape.. but there is a very noticeable difference between the actions.. 

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8 mins ago, Roddy said:

another lure I did well with was the old style rebel I think they were 5 inches long and the sinking ones casted better\farther and caught better too.

Ahhhhh yes... those old rebels were really something.. I used to have a few left behind by my grandfather. An old beat up silver one is stuck in my head, as i remember him loving that lure when we fished the porpoise channel many many years ago before he passed... 

I'm not sure if it was a sinker or just because of the wide angle between the body and the oversized lip, but I remember that lure really digging down. Could almost drag bottom with it in the right current.. picking up a few flatties while it's down there would suprise me at all..

 

Now I'm wondering where those lures wound up... your comment makes me want to dig them out for a revival tour and see if they are still as well recieved.. 

 

Thanks for the inspiration to try something new..

-J

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MY grandfather use to fish a inlet out east. I remember him asking for fluke spoons.  They looked like the ones your holding.  They were not as shiny as a reg casting spoon. They we’re bumpy.  I have to check as I have them now. This was early 60s 

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It's funny u mention the krocodile lure as that is what I was using when I learned the technique for bass a few seasons back.. as you said, I am dealing with a pretty stiff rip so I opted for a slightly heavier spoon and found these not only cast MUCH BETTER, but their specific action has attracted a lot more attention than my krocs ever did.. not sure what accounts for the difference as it's only a slight weight difference between a 1oz kroc and a 1.25oz run-off.. possibly body shape.. but there is a very noticeable difference between the actions.. 

It's obvious that bigger spoon in your pic is wider, and wider spoons tend to have a wider wobble. I liked the Krocs because they cast really well, plus a good flutter and if the current did get strong, they don't try to spin. 

I've got some of them up to 4 oz, but only used the heavier ones in the Chesapeake. 

 

Since you folks mentioned the Rebels, something I still have several of and still use, I've caught flounders in the surf on the floaters. Had to rig them with a 3 way swivel and sinker, like a fish finder rig, but they would catch flounders & other fish. Drag the sinker on the bottom, and rig the floater on a leader about 12" long, it runs up off the bottom. Something I discovered many years ago in Ocean City MD. At that time there was a bunch of breakwaters built along the beach to slow beach erosion, and at the end of the breakwaters, was a hole washed out by tides & waves. Another fellow was working those holes in the early morning by casting a sinking Rebel. I didn't have any sinking Rebels, so rigged the floaters and the rest is history. 

Edited by tidewaterfly

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16 hours ago, Beachglass Guru said:

Ahhhhh yes... those old rebels were really something.. I used to have a few left behind by my grandfather. An old beat up silver one is stuck in my head, as i remember him loving that lure when we fished the porpoise channel many many years ago before he passed... 

I'm not sure if it was a sinker or just because of the wide angle between the body and the oversized lip, but I remember that lure really digging down. Could almost drag bottom with it in the right current.. picking up a few flatties while it's down there would suprise me at all..

 

Now I'm wondering where those lures wound up... your comment makes me want to dig them out for a revival tour and see if they are still as well recieved.. 

 

Thanks for the inspiration to try something new..

-J

oh yes,,those rebels,,the model I had back then had the narrow lip and all our local B&T had left were either the floating "area tested" labeled models or the green mackerel sinking models.

caught my first bass of size on one one November night,was an epic battle.

solid current,casting across the current,letting some line out and tightening up and letting it sweep across then BAM!.

fish was around 15 lbs or so.

at that time there were not many bass around my parts just large gators which is what I was fishing for.

had to be around 1980-82 still have 6 of them but,most have lost their chromed finish.

they are hanging in my old pail with the wire loops fitted to the inside rim.

man those were the days! 

HH

a shot of some oldies.

5b89c9f6f32c6_HeavyHooksettersheavyactionpix133.JPG.dd7a1f0b4e6520d461a297a0fa7657a6.JPG

Edited by Roddy

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Have had luck from boat and shore snap jigging viper spoons. They have two small shingle hooks. I usually use them with a large gulp grub or bait strip. Deadly-at times-in current. 

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15 hours ago, tidewaterfly said:

It's obvious that bigger spoon in your pic is wider, and wider spoons tend to have a wider wobble. I liked the Krocs because they cast really well, plus a good flutter and if the current did get strong, they don't try to spin. 

I've got some of them up to 4 oz, but only used the heavier ones in the Chesapeake. 

 

Since you folks mentioned the Rebels, something I still have several of and still use, I've caught flounders in the surf on the floaters. Had to rig them with a 3 way swivel and sinker, like a fish finder rig, but they would catch flounders & other fish. Drag the sinker on the bottom, and rig the floater on a leader about 12" long, it runs up off the bottom. Something I discovered many years ago in Ocean City MD. At that time there was a bunch of breakwaters built along the beach to slow beach erosion, and at the end of the breakwaters, was a hole washed out by tides & waves. Another fellow was working those holes in the early morning by casting a sinking Rebel. I didn't have any sinking Rebels, so rigged the floaters and the rest is history. 

that's an interesting tech you describe,,I will have to try that one.

love them rebels for sure.

HH

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On 8/31/2018 at 6:23 PM, tidewaterfly said:

Since you folks mentioned the Rebels, something I still have several of and still use, I've caught flounders in the surf on the floaters. Had to rig them with a 3 way swivel and sinker, like a fish finder rig, but they would catch flounders & other fish. Drag the sinker on the bottom, and rig the floater on a leader about 12" long, it runs up off the bottom. Something I discovered many years ago in Ocean City MD. At that time there was a bunch of breakwaters built along the beach to slow beach erosion, and at the end of the breakwaters, was a hole washed out by tides & waves. Another fellow was working those holes in the early morning by casting a sinking Rebel. I didn't have any sinking Rebels, so rigged the floaters and the rest is history. 

Now that is definately a cool idea and something I could see myself trying with an SP minnow in the near future.. 

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On 8/31/2018 at 7:07 PM, Roddy said:

a shot of some oldies.

5b89c9f6f32c6_HeavyHooksettersheavyactionpix133.JPG.dd7a1f0b4e6520d461a297a0fa7657a6.JPG

Looks like there's a lot of life left in those lures.. many fish yet to be caught. I hope they find their place back in your ratation as I'm sure there are many epic battles left to be fought.. 

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On 8/31/2018 at 9:32 PM, jesgord said:

Have had luck from boat and shore snap jigging viper spoons. They have two small shingle hooks. I usually use them with a large gulp grub or bait strip. Deadly-at times-in current. 

Oddly enough I had never heard of a Viper spoon until I glanced at this post earlier.. then, as chance would have it, I stopped in at a small b&t shop on the east end and wouldn't you know it, they were right there in front of me on a rack... I had to pick one up out of curiosity.. I cant wait to test it out.. 

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