VanStaalSteve

SS bottle rigging

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Mr. VSS:

One idea not considered in your question, or at least not mentioned, is the concept of-- weeds.  Statistically, IF:  I get 3, 5 to 10 more reel handle cranks per cast on a plug than you do, who has the statistically better chance?

 

This "weed factor", which seems to be getting worse yearly with warming water and invasives, influences me greatly on lure choices-- like going to rigged eels (2 single hooks), or live ones (1 single hook).

 

I also agree with one of the above writers, that I just hate pulling a fish in sideways with a tail/trail hook looping around into the gill cover or back of the head.  I do not fish any lure with more than two treble hooks.  And when I do, barbs are all pinched down-- fish hassle as well as damage is too great otherwise.  I even fish the B1 Needlefish with two trebles; but the Dinner Catcher with just one.

SINGLE TREBLE.JPG

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8 hours ago, sauerkraut said:

Mr. VSS:

One idea not considered in your question, or at least not mentioned, is the concept of-- weeds.  Statistically, IF:  I get 3, 5 to 10 more reel handle cranks per cast on a plug than you do, who has the statistically better chance?

 

This "weed factor", which seems to be getting worse yearly with warming water and invasives, influences me greatly on lure choices-- like going to rigged eels (2 single hooks), or live ones (1 single hook).

 

I also agree with one of the above writers, that I just hate pulling a fish in sideways with a tail/trail hook looping around into the gill cover or back of the head.  I do not fish any lure with more than two treble hooks.  And when I do, barbs are all pinched down-- fish hassle as well as damage is too great otherwise.  I even fish the B1 Needlefish with two trebles; but the Dinner Catcher with just one.

SINGLE TREBLE.JPG

Why not a swivel on that MS? Canal style

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8 hours ago, sauerkraut said:

Mr. VSS:

One idea not considered in your question, or at least not mentioned, is the concept of-- weeds.  Statistically, IF:  I get 3, 5 to 10 more reel handle cranks per cast on a plug than you do, who has the statistically better chance?

 

This "weed factor", which seems to be getting worse yearly with warming water and invasives, influences me greatly on lure choices-- like going to rigged eels (2 single hooks), or live ones (1 single hook).

 

I also agree with one of the above writers, that I just hate pulling a fish in sideways with a tail/trail hook looping around into the gill cover or back of the head.  I do not fish any lure with more than two treble hooks.  And when I do, barbs are all pinched down-- fish hassle as well as damage is too great otherwise.  I even fish the B1 Needlefish with two trebles; but the Dinner Catcher with just one.

SINGLE TREBLE.JPG

Sauerkraut, I think you can utilize any hook configuration on a plug you like but when you start altering the hook(s) dramatically like leaving off the tail hook on an SS darter for example, you run the risk of fouling up the action on said plug(s) thus affecting their productivity. Plus, reducing the hooks to one treble on a larger plug really reduces the hook up ratio particularly with smaller stripers in my opinion. For example, I often use the "canal" rigging setup on my Sebile Magic swimmers. I don't fish the canal but find that the one treble on even smaller size magic swimmers works out pretty well for the most part in the waters I fish. The plug cast better and doesn't foul like it does with two hooks and has better action with no tail hook. However, the single treble on the belly results in less hook ups particularly when smaller fish are around. Another example is on an eel skin 7" Red fin that I fish. Because of the eel skin and the style of the plug I only use on treble ( 3/0) on the belly. This plug attracts a lot of bass but I miss many of them ( smaller fish I believe?) because of the one treble.

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On 8/30/2018 at 3:26 PM, redfin said:

Out of the package is doable too but a long feather off the back can and does make a difference sometimes. Another SS plug this is true for is the littleneck popper. If you are not trailing a long feathered single hook off the back when swimming these up top you are really missing out on a very unique and deadly plug IMO.

Very sage advice which holds true for many plugs & lures. Dressing a Super Strike plug up certainly doesn't adversely affect the plug & make it perform worse. The opposite can be true & in clear water,  adding a well tied tail can add lifelike movement to the plug as it swims.

 

If you want to swim the plug fast, a tail tied on a Siwash hook will perform fine. If you want or need to swim the plug slowly & leave it wiggling & suspended as it drifts through a strike zone, tying your tail on a Flag Post is better than a heavy hook.

 

The Flag will flutter & kick when a tail tied on a heavy hook will hang down & swim awkwardly in comparison. 

 

These Flags are deadly, they kick like crazy & wobble very realistically. 

 

20180903_080537.jpg.ad56de2e0edb0772148e926ad3808b63.jpg

20180610_091412.jpg.8393aeeed0a9c30f5a4c61c46976c7fd.jpg

 

My advice is to carry some altered Super Strike plugs for clear water situations. But there is more to this question in the context of a Darter.

 

On my Bottle Darterers, I usually just install an In-Line hook. Its not because I'm lazy or that I think the plug works better with a hook - because it does not!

 

The reason for doing this is because I fish Darters in heavier current & mostly at night & I have to be able to modify them to match conditions. You could easily do the same.

 

20180903_080438.jpg.549901736acfdbb65e6ee422b3ad47bb.jpg

 

Current can straighten a tail right out & render it ineffective. When I test a plug in my current tank, it's abundantly clear that Pork Rinds still flutter in heavy current when other materials are too light & will srraighten out. 

 

I will hang a yellow Uncle Josh Sea Strip (no longer made) off the back of the above SS Bottle in current. Rinds will flutter & kick in current. A jar of Pork Rinds makes it possible to quickly add a tail whenever you want & the In-Line hook is awesome for the fixed position mount at the aft of the plug.

 

You can make your own rinds very easily if you want to. 

 

Buy salt pork, also known as fatback, from your butcher. Trim off the excess fat. Fry the fatback in a hot pan, fat-side down, for 10 seconds. Add a cup of water, heat quickly, then lower the heat and simmer for 5 minutes. This renders the fat and makes the skin pliable and easier to cut. Keep the fatback flat during simmering. After cooling, use sharp scissors to cut the rind into your desired lure shapes. Color rinds as you would Easter eggs, in a solution of food coloring, one tablespoon of vinegar, and enough hot water to just cover the rind. Store your rinds in a very salty brine (use kosher salt).

 

You can also use 3" to 5" Grub Tails (plastic) with a drop of glue to hold them in place. I recommend  Bob Smith Industries 15 Second Instacure & then advise hit it with kicke to dry it instantly. 

 

Grub tails are useless in current though as they straighten out.

 

Lastly, with regards to rattles vs no rattles. On a Darter, in current, the rattle is a big advantage.  Plugs with Rattles will draw attention.  Some of the most effective sinking lures ever made feature rattles for a reason. They work!

Edited by CaryGreene
Typos

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Hi VSS.

My plug builder friend, George Christman, handle Numbskull, has just about cut me off from any more freebies because he is so disgusted with how I bastardize his carefully machined, carved, crafted, tested, and balanced creations!  He's even more indisposed when I take some of his plugs, refuse to use them, and display them in a glass case in my Fish Den.

 

But I have a personal feeling that the wash, waves, and kinetics of the water and surf environment toss these plugs around so much in the course of a cast and retrieve, that removing a hook or three does not change anything.

 

You bring up an obvious point that strikes may be missed disarming and uncovering a plug... And like you said-- especially small fish.  But that is OK in my mind.  A common approach that I and many others use is to start with big stuff first-- specifically to avoid spooking a hole on the first over eager 23 incher-- in favor of the 23 lber.  And I believe there is yet another upside to disarming beyond the "weed factor" I mentioned before:  And that is rubouts, for which big bass and rough terrain are quite adept.  The girls ram that plug into the next available boulder bottom or kelp bed entangling the extra exposed hooks, and tear you to pieces.  Lost big fish hurt me more than unhooked small fish.

Bonds,

Alan SauerKraut

 

PS:  I just wanted to drop the single treble on the SB a little further back, into a narrower part of the plug.  Are you familiar with the Pacific and Lake O. salmon plug rigging on a J-Plug?

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