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If the Democratic Party really admires "mavericks" so much—why don't they have one?

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The question is asked by Michael Graham in an opinion piece over at CBS News, and it is a serious one. 

 

If you are a Republican and you buck your party leadership, even break with it, that makes you a “maverick” in the eyes of many, particularly the Media and Dem leadership. 

 

However, if you are a Democrat and you break with Democrat dogma, that makes you a traitor, possibly a racist. 

 

How does that duality exist? But it does, and that answers the self-answering question from Mr. Graham, no?

 

Commentary: Where are the mavericks in the Democratic Party?

By Michael Graham CBS News August 29, 2018, 5:47 AM

 

If the Democratic Party really admires "mavericks" so much—why don't they have one?

 

Since a brain tumor claimed Sen. John McCain's life, Democrats have been effusive in their praise of his "maverick" style of politics. Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer called him one of the "few truly great people….a truth teller, never afraid to speak truth to power in an era where that has become all too rare."

 

Top House Democrat Nancy Pelosi said "America is in tears over the loss of a great man." Hillary Clinton praised him for his "example of working across the aisle," while former President Barack Obama urged grieving Americans to "aspire to the courage to put the greater good above our own."

 

If we've learned anything this week, it's that America's Democrats loved John McCain. So why don't any of them want to be him?

Who is the John McCain of the Democratic Party? The "maverick" who disagrees with his or her party's orthodoxy and is willing to confront it?  Is there such a figure?

 

Instead, an analysis of Congress by the Lugar Center found that, of the top 10 most bipartisan U.S. senators, just one—Joe Donnelly of Indiana—is a Democrat. Overwhelmingly, most of the "reaching across the aisle" is reaching from the Right.

 

Yes, there are a handful of Democrats in red states who occasionally vote with Republicans— Sens. Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota come to mind. But they're not "mavericks" bucking their party's ideology. They're just Democrats in Trump Country trying to figure out how Democratic they can be and still get re-elected. 

 

How about one of the members of the Senate "Pro-Life Democrats" caucus. Oh, wait—there isn't one. Because there aren't any pro-life Democrats in the Senate.  Sometimes senators like Manchin, Joe Donnelly of Indiana and Bob Casey of Pennsylvania are characterized as "pro-life." But their current scores from the National Abortion Rights Action League are 72, 74 and 100 percent, respectively. In a party whose chairman pledged the Democratic National Committee would only support pro-choice candidates (before he was forced to walk it back), this is hardly a surprise.

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Maverick doesn’t necessarily mean joining “the other side.” It could mean not being a representative of Goldman Sachs or Citibank.

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14 mins ago, rollincoal said:

Maverick doesn’t necessarily mean joining “the other side.” It could mean not being a representative of Goldman Sachs or Citibank.

Or the only real qualification of being a GOP maverick is to be a loser in your pursuit of the presidency. 

 

Anyone ever call Rand Paul a “maverick” for breaking with the GOP establishment? No, because Rand’s “brakes” really “pull right” 

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There's 2 ways to win the game of politics, one is to possess a vision with new ideas that appeals to the voter base, and the other is to simply attempt to deride the opposition and be the lesser of 2 evils.

The former is more effective, but requires greater skill.

I don't think they have it. 

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ZeroHedge pointing out that Facebook engineer says FB will “attack” anyone appearing to be mavericky. 

 

FACEBOOK ENGINEER: “‘WE ARE A POLITICAL MONOCULTURE THAT’S INTOLERANT OF DIFFERENT VIEWS’ and shockingly admitted that ‘we claim to welcome all perspectives, but are quick to attack — often in mobs — anyone who presents a view that appears to be in opposition to left-leaning ideology.’”

 

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11 hours ago, rollincoal said:

Maverick doesn’t necessarily mean joining “the other side.” It could mean not being a representative of Goldman Sachs or Citibank.

 

So, who is the maverick of the D party?

 

Why didnt Democrats cross the isle to vote in this national treasure?

 

These people are just so full of **** its disgusting.

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21 mins ago, Gamakatsu said:

 

The Associated Press' obituary of Miller:

 

Mr. Miller never changed parties, though many Democrats clamored for him to do so after he delivered a keynote speech for then-President George W. Bush at the 2004 Republican National Convention in New York.

 

Twelve years earlier, at the Democratic National Convention in the very same hall, Mr. Miller said Bill Clinton was the man America needed.

 

It was precisely the kind of unpredictable behavior that earned the independent-minded ex-Marine the nickname “Zig-Zag Zell.” The moniker initially infuriated him but in later life he acknowledged there was some truth to it.

 

“I would be suspect of any politician who doesn’t change their mind on some issues,” he said.

 

Note, the mavericky Miller was being nudged by his fellow Dems to leave the party, like he was some sort of "traitor". 

 

He was labeled "zig zag", a bit more derisive than "maverick". 

 

QED

Edited by tomkaz

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1 min ago, tomkaz said:

The Associated Press' obituary of Miller:

 

Mr. Miller never changed parties, though many Democrats clamored for him to do so after he delivered a keynote speech for then-President George W. Bush at the 2004 Republican National Convention in New York.

 

Twelve years earlier, at the Democratic National Convention in the very same hall, Mr. Miller said Bill Clinton was the man America needed.

 

It was precisely the kind of unpredictable behavior that earned the independent-minded ex-Marine the nickname “Zig-Zag Zell.” The moniker initially infuriated him but in later life he acknowledged there was some truth to it.

 

“I would be suspect of any politician who doesn’t change their mind on some issues,” he said.

 

Note, the mavericky Miller was being nudged by his fellow Dems to leave the party, like he was some sort of "traitor".

 

QED

You mean the way McCain is considered a traitor by some Republicans?

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