dannyplug1

Longest casting spinning reel

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Doing some reassessment on my fishing strategy.  I am 63 and find it harder and harder to get out to the way out rocks on the rock beaches I grew up fishing in RI.  Was thinking a longer casting set up would allow me to hit the spots I want with risking making a surfcasting version of the fallen and I can’t get up.  I have a ton of rods that might work but I would like some suggestions on a long casting spinning reel.  Don’t mind if choices are expensive.  Thanks Charlie ,old surfcaster.

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I think the Shimano Ultegra line of long cast reels are thought to be the standard. The new Shiman Ultegra CI14+ XTC in the 14000 size would be a good option. It’s super light and appears to have some level of sealing which older models were lacking. 

Penn has a long cast Spinfisher and has just released additional sizes. They are heavy though. Penn also just released a Conflict long cast which should be lighter. 

All of these should increase your range to some degree with the right rod. 

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The Ultegra Ci4 XTB 5500 is a good choice for distance, however, I find it a bit large & clumsy compared to the Saragosa 6000SW. The Saragosa is not as delicate as the Ultegra and has some sealing for waves. Distance is nearly as good running 30# PP with a 10'6 Legend.  I too am getting up there in age and try to minimize my time on slippery rocks. Reduce your line to 20-30lb test for distance, and reduce fatigue with a lightweight setup.

 

 

 

 

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I think improving your casting stroke would have more benefit. It would probably reduce the stress on your joints as well. But like the previous poster said the Aero Technium is probably the best if you are using a longer rod. Its like $500 though. The Daiwa Basi-air might be lighter but it is also less durable. The Ultegra 5k is better for smaller rods. I have not built many rods though so someone else may disagree.

 

At the end of the day, rod length will have a much greater effect on casting distance than a reel because if you think about it, how far a lure you are casting (if quantified in terms of gear and assuming proper technique) is basically

 

KE = (The initial velocity of the lure (a factor of tip speed)) - (Drag(line drag as well as air, but in this case, we are only worrying about the line drag))

 

*This is not exact but it is good enough*

 

The only things we can vary with different rods and reels are the tip speed and line drag. We are assuming the same line and lure. Using a thinner line also means less line drag though, which you might want to look into as well. 

 

less line drag = better casting reel

In the scheme of things, the line drag is much smaller than air drag of a big lure. Line diameter will have a much greater effect on the line drag than a better reel.

 

tip speed = length of rod * torque.

When you increase the rod length, you are lengthening the lever which means that the tip will move more for the same rotation on your end (i.e. faster), and since KE = 1/2mv^2, velocity (tip speed) has an exponential effect on your distance. 

Of course, this assumes you can move the longer rod as fast as a shorter rod, which is not always the case. So there is a limit to this extreme. Also, a softer rod will bend more reducing its effective length. That is why stiffer rods cast farther. 

 

I have omitted a few variables, but they are kind of irrelevant. Hopefully, this makes some kind of sense.

 

 

 

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I'm getting old too. The thought that you can replace wading out with a longer casting outfit does not always work in some situations. "Getting way out on the rocks" as the OP put it sounds like that exact type situation you may find hanging back with a distance outfit not as productive. I fished a lot in areas that sound similar and honestly, I found more often that not you need to be on that proverbial edge or that last rock. Although you might be able to match the distance from further back, you may not be able to do that with the lure you need at times. Sometimes it can just be the swing of the lure that you can't duplicate from further back. Of course you may wind up with a row of guys in front of you and find yourself pretty much shutdown. Been there a time or two. All that said a LC outfit has it's merits for sure and come in handy in a lot of other situations.

As far as reels go, I really like what Penn did in expanding the LC offerings. The Conflict LC got passed my radar. The 5k size looks very interesting for sure. Nothing wrong with adding another reel to the old arsenal either.

 

 

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Swinging a an 11ft rod with a 3' drop is essentially a 14' arc, so I agree with you that rod is prob not an issue. You seem confident that you have the right one somewhere. As for reels, I believe those with a slow-oscillating spool pack more line on per centimeter. The previous recommendations are solid. I thought the fairly new Penn Clashes were good combos of lightness and distance...good luck. 

 

PS: you're still stronger than a striper

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Suggest you post this question on the distance casting forum.

 

Increasing casting distance is accomplished by treating your gear, technique and bio-mechanics as a system.  In other words, you may have what you consider to be a long rod, but truthfully, the only older blanks (roughly pre-2005) that were designed for over the outer bar beach distance casting were the All-Star line in lengths 11ft 9in and above, the Wheels Reels needle and the Lamiglass Hatteras Heaver blanks that were almost exclusively sold from Delaware south.  With effort, one could get some Zziplex, Conolon and Century Blanks, but they were mostly intended for full off-the-ground or pendulum casts a-la European (300+ foot) bait and wait fishing with sinkers from 100 to 175 grams and clip-down pendulum rigs.

 

As an example, my 2 favorite big-pencil (2-3oz) rods are a Lamiglass SSB1388 (S-glass) and a Fenwick SU1348, but under no circumstances would I do anything other than an overhead thump cast with them, as they are almost guaranteed to fail under the stress.  Accordingly, the reels on them are either a VS250 (30lb PP) or, when it gets really cold, either a Crack 300 or Luxor 300, completely sealed and drilled with 15lb Berkley Big Game or 14lb Stren Magna-Thin mono.

 

Now, when I need to hit fish over the bar with the same pencil, I break out my Century HJ144L Carbon Fiber Rod which has an approximate 30inch butt to reel seat hood length and Fuji BSVMG guides in a NGC layout.  With an of-the-ground uni-tech cast, I hit 334.7ft with a VS250 , 30lb PP, 60lb shock leader, 41/2 ft 50lb floro leader ( vice a 3ft drop), and a 3oz Pencil, on a field, measured with a range finder during a SportCast USA sanctioned Fisherman's casting event (not a distance casting event).  I used the VS250, with a conical line lay, because I was curious to know the rod performance with a worst case reel situation. Time did not allow me to use one of my LC reels, but I feel it likely would have added 50-75 ft to the cast. Keep in mind that my entire lumbar spine and bottom half of my neck is herniated, I had a loose prosthetic left knee at that time and I have sensory/motor nerve degeneration in both legs and arms, so I have to be extremely diligent with practicing technique, i.e., the pull with the left, guide with the right technique versus the push with the right technique that we all learn first.

 

I suggest that before you invest in any LC reels, you look at Tommy Farmer's video on the Hatteras Cast, determine whether your rods can handle the stress of true power casting, and see if your are physically capable of executing these type of casts without negative physical effects (i.e., twisted knee, screw-up your back, etc.).  If all the answers are yes, then you need to practice on an completely empty football field until you can execute these casts and have the weight fly straight in front of you.  I would not worry about a LC reel until you can consistently hit 300 ft.

 

Assuming all goes well, some input to your original question: I personally own the Daiwa Saltiga Surf (no longer available, 1st LC in the US, magnesium body), the Daiwa Tournament Basia QD45 (still available, sold under the banner of European Specialty Carp tackle, magnesium body), and the following Shimano's:

  • Ultegra 5500 Ci4+ XSB
  • Ultegra 10000 XSC
  • Aero Technium 10000 XSC

All of the above Shimano's are no longer available in the US, but of these the Areo-Technium had superior line lay (Super Slow oscillation - 50 rotor turns over the length of the spool vs. 2 speed oscillation - 30 turns over the rotor spool, and thus superior casting distance over any other reel, Shimano, Daiwa. Penn or otherwise, with all other factors being equal.

 

For 2018, it seems that Shimano offers the Ultegra CI4+ 5500 and 14000 XTC, although it does not seem to be on the Shimano USA website, and I have only seen it in 1 local (we don't promote or discuss them here) store in Northern Ocean County . The Ultegra Ci4+ has Super Slow 5 Oscillation in the 14000, and slow oscillation in the 5500. Probably the most important features for surf casting, besides the line lay, are the Carbon Infused Graphite (Ci4+) construction, X-Protect water resistance and HAGANE Gear.

 

Hope this helps.

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9 hours ago, Kima said:

I would think the best casting reel would be the Aero Technium

If purely talking reel and not the other critical components, Kima got it right.....It's the Shimano Aero Technium XSB 10000.....I prefer it over the XSC. Only weighs 15.5 oz, ultra slow oscillation for supreme line lay.....look to the left.

Edited by dcast

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13 hours ago, FlatWing said:

Suggest you post this question on the distance casting forum.

 

Increasing casting distance is accomplished by treating your gear, technique and bio-mechanics as a system.  In other words, you may have what you consider to be a long rod, but truthfully, the only older blanks (roughly pre-2005) that were designed for over the outer bar beach distance casting were the All-Star line in lengths 11ft 9in and above, the Wheels Reels needle and the Lamiglass Hatteras Heaver blanks that were almost exclusively sold from Delaware south.  With effort, one could get some Zziplex, Conolon and Century Blanks, but they were mostly intended for full off-the-ground or pendulum casts a-la European (300+ foot) bait and wait fishing with sinkers from 100 to 175 grams and clip-down pendulum rigs.

 

As an example, my 2 favorite big-pencil (2-3oz) rods are a Lamiglass SSB1388 (S-glass) and a Fenwick SU1348, but under no circumstances would I do anything other than an overhead thump cast with them, as they are almost guaranteed to fail under the stress.  Accordingly, the reels on them are either a VS250 (30lb PP) or, when it gets really cold, either a Crack 300 or Luxor 300, completely sealed and drilled with 15lb Berkley Big Game or 14lb Stren Magna-Thin mono.

 

Now, when I need to hit fish over the bar with the same pencil, I break out my Century HJ144L Carbon Fiber Rod which has an approximate 30inch butt to reel seat hood length and Fuji BSVMG guides in a NGC layout.  With an of-the-ground uni-tech cast, I hit 334.7ft with a VS250 , 30lb PP, 60lb shock leader, 41/2 ft 50lb floro leader ( vice a 3ft drop), and a 3oz Pencil, on a field, measured with a range finder during a SportCast USA sanctioned Fisherman's casting event (not a distance casting event).  I used the VS250, with a conical line lay, because I was curious to know the rod performance with a worst case reel situation. Time did not allow me to use one of my LC reels, but I feel it likely would have added 50-75 ft to the cast. Keep in mind that my entire lumbar spine and bottom half of my neck is herniated, I had a loose prosthetic left knee at that time and I have sensory/motor nerve degeneration in both legs and arms, so I have to be extremely diligent with practicing technique, i.e., the pull with the left, guide with the right technique versus the push with the right technique that we all learn first.

 

I suggest that before you invest in any LC reels, you look at Tommy Farmer's video on the Hatteras Cast, determine whether your rods can handle the stress of true power casting, and see if your are physically capable of executing these type of casts without negative physical effects (i.e., twisted knee, screw-up your back, etc.).  If all the answers are yes, then you need to practice on an completely empty football field until you can execute these casts and have the weight fly straight in front of you.  I would not worry about a LC reel until you can consistently hit 300 ft.

 

Assuming all goes well, some input to your original question: I personally own the Daiwa Saltiga Surf (no longer available, 1st LC in the US, magnesium body), the Daiwa Tournament Basia QD45 (still available, sold under the banner of European Specialty Carp tackle, magnesium body), and the following Shimano's:

  • Ultegra 5500 Ci4+ XSB
  • Ultegra 10000 XSC
  • Aero Technium 10000 XSC

All of the above Shimano's are no longer available in the US, but of these the Areo-Technium had superior line lay (Super Slow oscillation - 50 rotor turns over the length of the spool vs. 2 speed oscillation - 30 turns over the rotor spool, and thus superior casting distance over any other reel, Shimano, Daiwa. Penn or otherwise, with all other factors being equal.

 

For 2018, it seems that Shimano offers the Ultegra CI4+ 5500 and 14000 XTC, although it does not seem to be on the Shimano USA website, and I have only seen it in 1 local (we don't promote or discuss them here) store in Northern Ocean County . The Ultegra Ci4+ has Super Slow 5 Oscillation in the 14000, and slow oscillation in the 5500. Probably the most important features for surf casting, besides the line lay, are the Carbon Infused Graphite (Ci4+) construction, X-Protect water resistance and HAGANE Gear. See the attached YouTube video. 

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

 

Great info here.thanks for taking the time to post it.

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8 hours ago, carbon12 said:

Curious how well the super slow oscillating line management spinners work when fished under heavy drag.  Is line pulled into the spooled line not a problem?

Has not been for me........I like the new Ultegra 5500 XTC, same 15.5 oz as the AT XSB. However, the AT has a 76mm diameter spool lip.......not so with the 5500......the 14000 may have 76mm but do not like the 19oz.

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