Bfishes333

How far is an ok cast?

148 posts in this topic

My advice is don't worry or focus on the distance. Focus on mechanics and right loops with good line speed and the distance will come.  Double hauling is important because of wind so get that down and you'll be fine. On average my casts are probably under 50 ft but the fish are biting at around 10-15 so I don't care

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Posted (edited)

2 hours ago, crunch said:

Sexyloops Masterclass videos have been free to watch for a while and they are very good for self learner especially if you can watch and listen them while practicing. Cell phone display might be too small but tablet or laptop is good but if sun is bright they might lack brightness so bring something which shades the display. Watch just the "Triangle Method" (lesson five if I remember right) and you understand how simple and fast it is to learn but then start from the beginning as learning good rog grip is very important so your wrist functions. Bad way to cast is more difficult to fix than learning good way in the beginning.

 

Esa

Thanks Crunch. I had read some of the sexyloops content before when someone else pointed me there but had not seen the videos. It's been bookmarked now and I have Vimeo so am looking forward to it. 

Edited by Bfishes333

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2 hours ago, Captain Tuttle said:

I have a small library of fly fishing books and videos, but this is THE book that helped me progress from a middling caster to a proficient caster.  This book is the best $25 you can spend on casting instructions.  

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Thank you. I will add this to the list of books to order. I have a couple coming but this should make it on the next order. 

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50 - 60ft accurate cast with 2 false casts = good

 

50 - 60ft inaccurate cast with 17 false casts= bad

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If I had to do it all over again, I would only practice casting into strong wind. anyone can bomb a 100' cast with the wind at their back. much more difficult to do that in a quartering headwind. this will make any other conditions feel like a breeze :D

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3 mins ago, Wicked-Fly said:

If I had to do it all over again, I would only practice casting into strong wind. anyone can bomb a 100' cast with the wind at their back. much more difficult to do that in a quartering headwind. this will make any other conditions feel like a breeze :D

Agreed on all but one detail. Learning to cast into a pressing headwind will build skill and casting competency like nothing else will. If you can blast 70 feet into a head wind, 90 or 100 in calm conditions is absolutely doable. And 100+ with a tailing wind is possible too. 

 

The only thing I may disagree with is if anyone can push 100 feet into a decent headwind. Even with my double hander about 80 into a respectable headwind is about my limit. With my 10wt it's usually about 60 or 65 that's my maximum.

 

Then again, there's casters who could make me look like a toddler waving around a baby rattle out there, so who knows. 

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Posted (edited)

Just to add to the excellent replies, you mention using a small fly to practice with, but casting with a much larger fly that may have more air resistance or be much heavier will be a different animal. You may find that as the fly changes, so will your casting distance. People post on forums such this all the time that they can cast small flies just fine, but not larger flies. Follow the other advice given here, but also practice with flies of various sizes, those which you may actually use to fish with, and see what adjustments you need to make. Push the limits to find the limit of how big you may go with your flies. Like being able to cast at distance when needed, being able to cast a range of flies is never a bad thing either. I very much agree with practicing casting, and with fishing. It’s often difficult to concentrate on both, but both are important to anyone’s development. I used to like to practice my casting on the water when the fish didn’t want to cooperate since being on the water is not the same as casting in the yard. Both can be helpful, just don’t take the fun out it by getting frustrated by either. 

 

Edited by tidewaterfly

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21 mins ago, RedGreen said:

Agreed on all but one detail. Learning to cast into a pressing headwind will build skill and casting competency like nothing else will. If you can blast 70 feet into a head wind, 90 or 100 in calm conditions is absolutely doable. And 100+ with a tailing wind is possible too. 

 

The only thing I may disagree with is if anyone can push 100 feet into a decent headwind. Even with my double hander about 80 into a respectable headwind is about my limit. With my 10wt it's usually about 60 or 65 that's my maximum.

 

Then again, there's casters who could make me look like a toddler waving around a baby rattle out there, so who knows. 

sorry missed this part, thought you said tailwind here. not sure where I said talked about casting 100' into a headwind. I have found the majority of the time the wind pushes the bait so 100' into headwind isn't necessary (although to be honest i dont mind directly into the wind, its those quarter headwinds that bother me)

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58 mins ago, Wicked-Fly said:

sorry missed this part, thought you said tailwind here. not sure where I said talked about casting 100' into a headwind. I have found the majority of the time the wind pushes the bait so 100' into headwind isn't necessary (although to be honest i dont mind directly into the wind, its those quarter headwinds that bother me)

I see, my apologies. I had assumed you were implying that it's much easier to cast 100' with a tail wind than 100' into a headwind. I misunderstood your original post. My apologies. 

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2 hours ago, tidewaterfly said:

Just to add to the excellent replies, you mention using a small fly to practice with, but casting with a much larger fly that may have more air resistance or be much heavier will be a different animal. You may find that as the fly changes, so will your casting distance. People post on forums such this all the time that they can cast small flies just fine, but not larger flies. Follow the other advice given here, but also practice with flies of various sizes, those which you may actually use to fish with, and see what adjustments you need to make. Push the limits to find the limit of how big you may go with your flies. Like being able to cast at distance when needed, being able to cast a range of flies is never a bad thing either. I very much agree with practicing casting, and with fishing. It’s often difficult to concentrate on both, but both are important to anyone’s development. I used to like to practice my casting on the water when the fish didn’t want to cooperate since being on the water is not the same as casting in the yard. Both can be helpful, just don’t take the fun out it by getting frustrated by either. 

 

I guess it would be small compare to throwing a plug or even  paddle tails. I'm really not sure what size range these would be considered. The size I have been practicing with is like the green one green one up top. The rest of these I have not fished yet and have either been given to me or made by a buddy with the exception of yhe bottom lefy which I ordered for a vuck and some change, so not sure if I'm in the right direction. 

15296246298581551437564.jpg

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15 hours ago, tidewaterfly said:

Just to add to the excellent replies, you mention using a small fly to practice with, but casting with a much larger fly that may have more air resistance or be much heavier will be a different animal. You may find that as the fly changes, so will your casting distance. People post on forums such this all the time that they can cast small flies just fine, but not larger flies. Follow the other advice given here, but also practice with flies of various sizes, those which you may actually use to fish with, and see what adjustments you need to make. Push the limits to find the limit of how big you may go with your flies. Like being able to cast at distance when needed, being able to cast a range of flies is never a bad thing either. I very much agree with practicing casting, and with fishing. It’s often difficult to concentrate on both, but both are important to anyone’s development. I used to like to practice my casting on the water when the fish didn’t want to cooperate since being on the water is not the same as casting in the yard. Both can be helpful, just don’t take the fun out it by getting frustrated by either. 

 

I don't know what the newer casters here are doing when they practice. For them, practice should be 100% about the basics, until they develop a good stroke that's ingrained. You practice with a floating or intermediate line, not a sinker. And with a small fly, or a piece of yarn. To use anything else; it makes you compensate, to one degree or another.

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It anyone wants to stay distinctly average and always wish they had a good cast then the way to do it is to teach yourself.

 

Pointless in investing money on gear and never invest any on casting lessons.

 

It is just not true that fish are mostly caught at short range. If it were there would be no need for the endless posts about how to improve ones cast.

 

Better to buy low end gear and buy high end lessons. But it is never going to be that way when for many that $800 Rod is the shiny solution.

 

Mike

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I will agree gear doesn’t make you a better caster and lessons are the best way to improve. Needing to cast far to catch stripers anyways is a myth IMO. I see guys wading out waste deep trying to cast a mile while there are fish swimming behind them. Sometimes yes distance can matter but in most cases it does not. Fishing a beach I can normally catch fish within 30 ft and not just dinks. I can literally lay the head out and catch fish. So why distance matters to catch fish is beyond me. Even when casting to my backing I rarely get a strike that far out unless there is structure I  trying to reach. Most of the time the fish aren’t far is all I am saying 

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14 mins ago, Mike Oliver said:

It anyone wants to stay distinctly average and always wish they had a good cast then the way to do it is to teach yourself.

 

Pointless in investing money on gear and never invest any on casting lessons.

 

It is just not true that fish are mostly caught at short range. If it were there would be no need for the endless posts about how to improve ones cast.

 

Better to buy low end gear and buy high end lessons. But it is never going to be that way when for many that $800 Rod is the shiny solution.

 

Mike

I will be investing in some lessons l well the guy I know that guides just said to give him gas money and he will take me out whenever we set it up. 

I dont ever beach fish really. I always canoe or take the boat out but I do believe that the more water you cover the higher chance you have of putting it in front of a fish if not sight casting. 

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