Dooski18

Stripers there but not biting.

64 posts in this topic

Striped bass just not hitting.  Wondering if anyone has ever had this where they can see huge bass all over under the boat but not taking any of your offerings?  I had this happen on Sunday only thing i did not offer was live bait.  They seemed like they were being very picky.  Top water i would cast and they would spook just by the lure hitting the water.  Everything else not even a single tap or look.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

was in buzzards bay the other day. casted magic swimmers out to them in 20 ft of water from a boat. caught some decent sized ones. didnt try top waters

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seemed like they were eating something really small but did not see any evidence of what.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The last time I saw this was many years ago when on the Vineyard with lots of big bass on the surface and they just seemed to be milling around and sunning themselves.  I was told that when they are like that they are usually feeding on Krill. 

 

Don't know if that was true or not but it made sense since we could not realy see anything in the water. It was a frustrating day to say the least.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have heard the krill thing to. What I do is back off from them and wait until a noticeable change (tide shift, water temp, rain, cloud cover, etc). Have had many times where they would eventually turn on. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I could see their fins coming up out of the water every once in a while and like you said being lazy and sunning themselves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Were there finely rippling waves at the surface surrounding them.

 

My bet is they were watching the nonstop channel 25 tornado warnings this afternoon, and were stupified.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

The great thing about polarized sunglasses is that you can see fish following your fly/lure.  The bad thing about polarized sunglasses is that you watch them not take your fly/lure.  They can be picky.  Sometimes you have to match the hatch.  Other times you have to put a lot of action on your presentation.  Sometimes putting scent on your lure is the difference between fishing and catching.  Getting them to strike topwater lures on anything less than a full-blown surface feed can be difficult.  

Edited by Captain Tuttle
double verb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've seen this a lot. Stripers are lazy, prissy fish. I was fishing the other day and they refused to even eat live mackerel. 20lb fluorocarbon with a small hook. They would come over and look at it, then leave. Kept doing that for 45 minutes. Then I starting chumming up dead ones and they started eating all the chum. Eventually they took a chunk on a hook but still wouldn't eat the live bait.

 

When they are acting like that it's because they can either see something, the water temp is off, or they are eating something else. When bass are keyed in on something, sometimes that's all they want. They will either ignore your offering or may even be spooked by it.  

 

Another variable is when you hook one, the others will sense fear and leave. So you may have just had 50 fish around your boat but now they are gone because you hooked a small one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

57 mins ago, GooganFish said:

I've seen this a lot. Stripers are lazy, prissy fish. I was fishing the other day and they refused to even eat live mackerel. 20lb fluorocarbon with a small hook. They would come over and look at it, then leave. Kept doing that for 45 minutes. Then I starting chumming up dead ones and they started eating all the chum. Eventually they took a chunk on a hook but still wouldn't eat the live bait.

 

When they are acting like that it's because they can either see something, the water temp is off, or they are eating something else. When bass are keyed in on something, sometimes that's all they want. They will either ignore your offering or may even be spooked by it.  

 

Another variable is when you hook one, the others will sense fear and leave. So you may have just had 50 fish around your boat but now they are gone because you hooked a small one.

Do you think it's possible that they have full belly syndrome but can't pass up a small morsel like the guy on Monty Python? I'm serious.

Edited by Stonesipher

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 mins ago, Stonesipher said:

Do you think it's possible that they have full belly syndrome but can't pass up a small morsel like the guy on Monty Python? I'm serious.

Pass me some of that kind bud and I'll tell you all about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m not so sure it has so much to do with what they’re keyed in on, I believe the problem is they’re just not in an eating mode. It’s almost like a collective social behavior. They’re all just there, not eating, not doing much other than gathering. I see this very often in my area, and being on the water 7 days a week helps, but I’d be lying if I told you there was a single solution to the problem. Each time it’s a different technique, and sometimes nothing works. I’ve been into schools like this tossing eels, for instance, and they were shunned. Honestly, I find bright sun to be helpful at times since you can target specific fish you’re sighting. You can more easily see the fish react (or not) to the offering and adjust your retrieve accordingly, which can make the presentation appear more natural to the fish. Topwater lures rarely work on these fish, but sometimes an erratic retrieve will ignite a competitive reaction and possible hit. I find small soft plastics on long, light leaders are the most consistent producers, regardless of light conditions. 5” and 7” Fin-S fish on lightly weighted swimbait hooks are my top producers, but again, it’s still a tough game. Tiny glass rattles inserted into the plastics absolutely help get their attention. The fly rod is also a great tool, but even that gets snubbed too. The name of the game is finesse. You have to be prepared to offer subtle, small lures, which defies conventional big fish knowledge. The best comparison I can make is to tarpon. These big, sleepy fish are often fooled with small, subtly presented offerings, but many times you’re left feeling humbled, with a greater desire to figure out the complexity of their nature. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 mins ago, Stonesipher said:

Do you think it's possible that they have full belly syndrome but can't pass up a small morsel like the guy on Monty Python? I'm serious.

 

Mr Creosote!   "I cant eat another bite!  *** off, I'm full!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know for a 100% fact that what they are keyed in on is a very significant variable. Can be other stuff too though. I've fished many blitzes where the fish are going wild on herring schools but won't hit a lure, chunk, live mackerel, squid, etc. This particular spot is right next to my house so I've fished it for years and years. Always a ton of bass there for the whole summer. Tried every lure I own. Tried flies, metals, eels, bait, etc. You put on a live herring, and it's game on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.