northbeach

Striped Bass squid Flies

Rate this topic

60 posts in this topic

I was searching SOL to find squid fly patterns to tie and  try next summer for stripers in the Miramichi area of New Brunswick and came upon this thread and Capt.Ray's generously shared step-by-step of his Squid-sicle pattern which is doubly interesting for me as I have a lot of rabbit strips. However I read carefully the instructions but it is not clear to me how to put together the eye assembly before tying it in and I am hoping that Capt. Ray would kindly elaborate on this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Suave said:

I was searching SOL to find squid fly patterns to tie and  try next summer for stripers in the Miramichi area of New Brunswick and came upon this thread and Capt.Ray's generously shared step-by-step of his Squid-sicle pattern which is doubly interesting for me as I have a lot of rabbit strips. However I read carefully the instructions but it is not clear to me how to put together the eye assembly before tying it in and I am hoping that Capt. Ray would kindly elaborate on this.

Thrown For a Loop

 

Really now! Who hasn’t incurred a problem while tying? It happens to all of us who try to tie new patterns. More so with individuals who tend to push the limits of materials and construction.  We first look for clever solutions to solve simple problems. One expression reminds us that, “Necessity is the mother of all inventions.” This axiom has been around for centuries. If you are a New Englander, one might suspect it goes back to the early settlements. Colonists were known for solving problems with ingenious inventions. Practically and common sense governed their designs. Ask my wife. She has all these little gadgets that make life in the kitchen easier.

 

Fly recipes are no different. New materials are constantly evolving each day. Technology changes so rapidly we don’t have time to fully comprehend the impact before it changes again. But no matter what; tiers gain a wealth of knowledge about procedures. We begin to notice flaws and discrepancies and start to make improvements.  

 

Flies are judged by performance. The primary objective is to deceive any predator into thinking it is a food source. But there are many more concerns for an angler. Flies have to be durable. The casting of fly lines can reach speeds over 50 mph or more. Materials have to be resistant to the harsh environments of both fresh and saltwater. Lastly, durability is an important factor. Flies have to resist the punishment of toothy critters chewing on the fibers. Surprising, no major overhaul is required. It’s not like re-inventing the wheel; it may only need a tiny modification. In fact, simple solutions seem to work best over the long run.

 

What’s your problem?

 

If you sat down and tabulated a deficiency list in fly construction, eye assembly would be near the top. How frustrating it is to see a fly come back missing an eye or two after only a few retrieves.  Most problems arises where the eye is placed and on what type of material. Lately I’ve been tooling around with squid pattern designs. They themselves present a unique situation since the eyes have to be moved backwards, sometimes off the hook shank. The location is critical to achieve exactness and proper proportions. What’s left beyond the hook gap is usually a platform of fragile feathers. Unfortunately with the movement of materials, most glues do not adequately hold. This method therefore has inherited flaws. My squid flies require a greater distance of eye separation if a full profile is to be achieved from all viewing angles. 

 

The eye attachment problem has been addressed over the years in several ways. Most all agree the best remedy is to provide some form of extension. Flexible tubing has been a popular choice. It can be cut to any length or used in any diameter size. The tubing itself on squid patterns can also enhanced the mantle construction. Tubing helps increase the bulk of a fly. It is a great material to conceal a rattle. No special wrapping or epoxying is required. Just slide the rattle inside for a bullet proof design.

 

 

 

The second popular option is the use of monofilament line. Three dimensional eyes (often called 3-D) can be attached to short lengths in various ways. Self sticking eyes by themselves do not have the holding power to stay on for long. Additional adhesives are required. Some products like Goop are effective. A loop end may be formed to provide more contact area with the plastic eye. 

 

So what’s a better way?

 

Recently I have been tinkering with a simple, yet effective method of eye construction.  For lack of a better term, I call it a modified version with heavy monofilament. Unlike the single stand, I substitute two pieces. Both mono strands run parallel across the back thru the center of each eye. Five minute epoxy is used to totally waterproof the assembly. This new method solves several problems. Each eye is now positioned on the same lanyards which makes the alignment easier. The difficulty in using single strand causes each eye to roll independently of each other. The double lanyard prevents this, plus it gives it more stability when attached to the hook shank.

 

One added feature to this new assembly is eye separation. The increased distance creates a more symmetrical full profile from any view. Who knows from what direction a fish first see your fly? Why not try to make it realistic from any viewing angle? Just makes sense.

 

Finally, the last advantage of this technique serves as a material support. Each eye works as a barrier from stopping materials from moving side to side. This supports the upper and lower half. In essences, it serves as a fouling loop also.

 

Eye Construction Technique

 

List of materials for the smaller Squid-Sicle eye assembly

 

 

50 lb. test monofilament leader material

Holographic 3-D eyes, 5/16 diameter

5-Minute two part epoxy

Post-it Pad

 

Step 1 Template

 

On a paper or cardboard mark two “Cross-Hairs” three quarter inch apart. This distance is determined by the amount of eye separation you want. In this case, the smaller squid requires a separation of ¼ inch as it is attached to the hook shank. Multiplying that distance (1/4) by three. This will equal the distance on the template. Larger squid patterns will require more eye separation, but the formula of multiplying it by three remains the same.

 

 

 

 

Step 2 Eye Assembly

 

Place eyes on each cross-hair, glue side up. Tweezers or bodkin may help position eyes. Cut two lengths of 50 lb. monofilament four inches long. Align both pieces of monofilament using both hands. The line set should be the same. Slide each set of fingers toward the ends. Carefully align the mono over the center of eyes as shown in photo. Press down mono across both eyes. The eye assembly should look like a pair of miniature sun glasses. It is important that both eyes are square and not slanted when placed down. Make adjusts if necessary with the push of a finger.  

 

Epoxy Hints:

 

Use a smaller diameter bodkin on smaller work.

 

Lift the bodkin straight up when applying and removing the tool over the eyes. This will prevent the epoxy from running on the underside of the eyes.

 

Step 3 Gluing

 

Mix a small amount of epoxy on a separate Post-It Pad. Hold eye assembly in hand while placing it on a clean surface. Apply enough epoxy to cover each eye completely. (See insert)  (Choose Drying Fixture 2 photo if you use the insert note)  

An easily made drying fixture can be fashioned out of two Pastes-Its pads. Just separate the pads far enough so that eye assembles float without touching the table. 

Three pair of eyes can be done with the same batch of epoxy. This is a time saver.     

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 mins ago, Capt.Castafly said:

Thrown For a Loop

 

Really now! Who hasn’t incurred a problem while tying? It happens to all of us who try to tie new patterns. More so with individuals who tend to push the limits of materials and construction.  We first look for clever solutions to solve simple problems. One expression reminds us that, “Necessity is the mother of all inventions.” This axiom has been around for centuries. If you are a New Englander, one might suspect it goes back to the early settlements. Colonists were known for solving problems with ingenious inventions. Practically and common sense governed their designs. Ask my wife. She has all these little gadgets that make life in the kitchen easier.

 

Fly recipes are no different. New materials are constantly evolving each day. Technology changes so rapidly we don’t have time to fully comprehend the impact before it changes again. But no matter what; tiers gain a wealth of knowledge about procedures. We begin to notice flaws and discrepancies and start to make improvements.  

 

Flies are judged by performance. The primary objective is to deceive any predator into thinking it is a food source. But there are many more concerns for an angler. Flies have to be durable. The casting of fly lines can reach speeds over 50 mph or more. Materials have to be resistant to the harsh environments of both fresh and saltwater. Lastly, durability is an important factor. Flies have to resist the punishment of toothy critters chewing on the fibers. Surprising, no major overhaul is required. It’s not like re-inventing the wheel; it may only need a tiny modification. In fact, simple solutions seem to work best over the long run.

 

What’s your problem?

 

If you sat down and tabulated a deficiency list in fly construction, eye assembly would be near the top. How frustrating it is to see a fly come back missing an eye or two after only a few retrieves.  Most problems arises where the eye is placed and on what type of material. Lately I’ve been tooling around with squid pattern designs. They themselves present a unique situation since the eyes have to be moved backwards, sometimes off the hook shank. The location is critical to achieve exactness and proper proportions. What’s left beyond the hook gap is usually a platform of fragile feathers. Unfortunately with the movement of materials, most glues do not adequately hold. This method therefore has inherited flaws. My squid flies require a greater distance of eye separation if a full profile is to be achieved from all viewing angles. 

 

The eye attachment problem has been addressed over the years in several ways. Most all agree the best remedy is to provide some form of extension. Flexible tubing has been a popular choice. It can be cut to any length or used in any diameter size. The tubing itself on squid patterns can also enhanced the mantle construction. Tubing helps increase the bulk of a fly. It is a great material to conceal a rattle. No special wrapping or epoxying is required. Just slide the rattle inside for a bullet proof design.

 

 

 

The second popular option is the use of monofilament line. Three dimensional eyes (often called 3-D) can be attached to short lengths in various ways. Self sticking eyes by themselves do not have the holding power to stay on for long. Additional adhesives are required. Some products like Goop are effective. A loop end may be formed to provide more contact area with the plastic eye. 

 

So what’s a better way?

 

Recently I have been tinkering with a simple, yet effective method of eye construction.  For lack of a better term, I call it a modified version with heavy monofilament. Unlike the single stand, I substitute two pieces. Both mono strands run parallel across the back thru the center of each eye. Five minute epoxy is used to totally waterproof the assembly. This new method solves several problems. Each eye is now positioned on the same lanyards which makes the alignment easier. The difficulty in using single strand causes each eye to roll independently of each other. The double lanyard prevents this, plus it gives it more stability when attached to the hook shank.

 

One added feature to this new assembly is eye separation. The increased distance creates a more symmetrical full profile from any view. Who knows from what direction a fish first see your fly? Why not try to make it realistic from any viewing angle? Just makes sense.

 

Finally, the last advantage of this technique serves as a material support. Each eye works as a barrier from stopping materials from moving side to side. This supports the upper and lower half. In essences, it serves as a fouling loop also.

 

Eye Construction Technique

 

List of materials for the smaller Squid-Sicle eye assembly

 

 

50 lb. test monofilament leader material

Holographic 3-D eyes, 5/16 diameter

5-Minute two part epoxy

Post-it Pad

 

Step 1 Template

 

On a paper or cardboard mark two “Cross-Hairs” three quarter inch apart. This distance is determined by the amount of eye separation you want. In this case, the smaller squid requires a separation of ¼ inch as it is attached to the hook shank. Multiplying that distance (1/4) by three. This will equal the distance on the template. Larger squid patterns will require more eye separation, but the formula of multiplying it by three remains the same.

 

 

 

 

Step 2 Eye Assembly

 

Place eyes on each cross-hair, glue side up. Tweezers or bodkin may help position eyes. Cut two lengths of 50 lb. monofilament four inches long. Align both pieces of monofilament using both hands. The line set should be the same. Slide each set of fingers toward the ends. Carefully align the mono over the center of eyes as shown in photo. Press down mono across both eyes. The eye assembly should look like a pair of miniature sun glasses. It is important that both eyes are square and not slanted when placed down. Make adjusts if necessary with the push of a finger.  

 

Epoxy Hints:

 

Use a smaller diameter bodkin on smaller work.

 

Lift the bodkin straight up when applying and removing the tool over the eyes. This will prevent the epoxy from running on the underside of the eyes.

 

Step 3 Gluing

 

Mix a small amount of epoxy on a separate Post-It Pad. Hold eye assembly in hand while placing it on a clean surface. Apply enough epoxy to cover each eye completely. (See insert)  (Choose Drying Fixture 2 photo if you use the insert note)  

An easily made drying fixture can be fashioned out of two Pastes-Its pads. Just separate the pads far enough so that eye assembles float without touching the table. 

Three pair of eyes can be done with the same batch of epoxy. This is a time saver.     

 

 

 

Ray.   Nice SBS.  Bg chance any photos to go along?

 

Thx,  HT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

On 6/22/2018 at 3:40 PM, bobtheflounder said:

there is this one squid fly that I have gotten from a shop and used a while back. It uses a chenille body and feathers for the tail, and kind of looks like a schminnow but with a tapered body and eyes in a different position. I forgot what its called though. I liked it a lot because it didn't foul. 

Sounds something like this:

 

SquidSpecial.jpg

This one someone called "The Squid Special"

Edited by GregPavlov

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you once again. You guys are generous in transmitting your knowledge about fly tying.

 

 Although I've been a fly angler (mostly Atlantic salmon, brook trout and smallmouth bass) for more decades that I care to remember and a fly tyer for 35 years, I'm only a beginner as far as fly angling in, and fly tying for, the salt, having begun in 2014 when a season was open for stripers on the Southern shore of the Gaspé peninsula.

 

This is what's fun about fishing, and more so about fly tying, when you have an opportunity to go after a new species: becoming a beginner anew (well sort of...) and discovering and learning which is always a great pleasure when it's about something you love. So I went roaming on Internet and very early came upon SOL and it became my Bible about striper fishing and fly tying for it. 

 

And I discovered a community of great anglers and great fly tyers, including some who are really masters of the craft, those imaginative (something I'm not, at least when it comes to fly tying) great tyers who come up with new tying techniques to use materials, even old standbys like bucktail, and thus create wonderful new patterns. And, as I mentioned before, a community generous in sharing its knowledge and expertise.

 

So I've been taking a lot out of SOL for the past 4 years without putting in much (as evidenced by the small number of posts to my credit), something I hope to remedy as I learn more and more about striper fishing.

 

The least I can do is thank you all sincerely for your "gifts".

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ginclear said:

As I had posted earlier in this thread, I love Ray's @Capt.Castafly Squid-Sicle. I just tied up 15 of these for our annual flyfishingnewengland[dot]net fly swap.

BZvhJVQcEjqcNEXV4sYPGyYbV9g6K-bVR-coTvlO

You've got 'um down pat. Nice ties! Maybe see you at Marlboro?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Capt.Castafly said:

You've got 'um down pat. Nice ties! Maybe see you at Marlboro?

Thank you @Capt.Castafly Ray! My son, his girlfriend & I will be attending on Saturday. We plan to attend Steve Culton's @The Fisherman's 10:00 AM "Targeting Big Stripers from the Shore" and  Alan Caolo's 1:00 PM "The Challenge and Thrill of False Albacore from Shore". I will stop by the tiers row and say hello. Look forward to catching up. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice flies Ginclear.

Slip n slide : found your posts of 2014 and 2016 on your squid flies and how and when to fish them. Very good info. One question on your floating pattern for which you share a lot of tying info: how do you attach the foam cylinder on the hook shank? À la Bob's Bangers as in the shorty you refer to? Or some other way?

You provide less info on your "wet" patterns and the pictures are not clear enough, at least to me. You seem to tie those 2 ways.: one with an estaz chenille body (as you mention in your post for the female squid) covered with a rabbit strip that completes the body and imitates the tentacles with something else tied underneath as a "tail"; the other with a body of "hackled" rabbit strip (crosscut?) as in Capt. Ray's Sicle-Squid with another strip tied as a tail to provide tentacles. And in each case I can't figure out how you attach the eyes. 

 

More info would be helpful and appreciated.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.