Mlugris

How to find fish surfcasting

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Hello everyone been out fishing my ass off north and south shore still very new managed to catch small striper and robins and more robins . How do u guys find fish while on the beaches of li in short what are u guys looking for once your boots hit the ground anything would be helpful thanks guys ! 

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I know I'll be mauled for typing this and its merely based on my experience.

 

I know stripers relate to structure , depressions..bla bla .

 

I have watched many videos about reading the surf,  the Rich Troxx video and everything in between 

 

I have come to the conclusion that I am shmuck and I don't get it.


Yes the waves crash slightly differently.. but I just don't have confidence in reading a section of the beach.  Maybe you get lucky at low tide and can see a point or a cove..happens occasionally.

 

I think the fish are on the move during the day.. the patrol the beach in the troughs and lips, they don't just sit there  ( maybe the cows do ).. the smaller class of fish " schoolies" are on the move, blues are on the move.

 

I work my angles and once I stopped casting straight in front of me.. my life got interesting, my retrieves and my lures run parallel or 45 degree to the beach.. not straight 90.

 

I'm not a sharpie and I'm not catching big fish.. but I'm catching.

 

My 2 pennies...

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Posted (edited) · Report post

most popular tools for finding fish in NJ are binoculars, cell phones and the facebooks

 

 

 

in all seriousness walk A LOT and pay attention to your surroundings and the others in them. time served will be rewarded eventually. 

Edited by part cork

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I think it’s all about structure “hard” and “soft”. Jetties, boulder fields, points, sandbars, rips, channels, troughs, eddies, etc. Find an area with some structure....go to the nearest, point, look for sandbars at low tide, find areas where the current is moving faster or slower than the surrounding area and fish it to death (If there is no visible structure-and there are waves, fish the wave trough and the whitewater behind the waves. Explore all areas of the water column, surface, sub-surface and near bottom. Fish the crap out of it and see if it produces....then fish it some more. After some effort you will figure out what works....you will see certain plugs of jigs producing, you will gain confidence (which is one of the biggest keys) and then you will start catching more. 

Edited by jesgord

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My advice if you're new. Find structure as mentioned above but find it close to home or to the area most easily accessible to you. Fish it hard on both tides with the wind that seems most beneficial. Jumping around alot will not gain you much knowledge of how any spot works. If you've picked a spot that's popular then be polite, keep your distance but watch what others are doing. You'll be sure to meet some locals who you can ask for advice but be reasonable, it's rare that someone is going to spell it out completely for you. 

Buy stuff at your local tackle shop or the shop that's closest to the area you've chosen and ask for pointers. It takes time but just stick with it and success will come. 

Read Zeno Hromin's book Surfcasting with Lures, also John Skinner's book about fishing with bucktails, I forget the title.

Use NOAA charts on-line and google maps, they're helpful. Use NOAAs tide predictions for your spots. Windfinder for wind, sometimes it'll be right...

Good luck, don't lose faith. Don't drive when you're too tired, it's not worth it.

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The search function on this site is your greatest resource. There is a wealth of information and this question has been asked many times. It is likely that some of the best responses from the past will not get repeated here in your post because the guys who spent the time to write them are not going to repeat them.

Here's a post to get you started:

http://www.stripersonline.com/surftalk/topic/704330-how-do-you-know-when-the-fish-are-around-fishing-reports/

My reply to that post was:

Make it your goal to never have to ask anyone else about when and where and under which conditions to fish.

Pick 3 spots and learn them like the back of your hand. Fish them under every imaginable condition until you can figure out which of the 3 spots is best for a certain set of conditions. Keep records. Then rinse and repeat with 3 more spots. The lessons you learn for yourself will stay with you forever. 

 

And don't sweat the Robins. They are everywhere this year. 

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One more thing to consider - there is a heck of a lot less fish than if you were fishing in the past.  While it's getting better, especially in the rat/schoolie category, it's tough hitting the suds.  Definitely far harder than what was my best times in the '90s (got started during moratorium).  Even the bait is still not what I remember from prior to both prior to Irene/Sandy, where we'd have YUGE blitzes on acres of bait.  And when I bounce back and forth a couple of NY inlets, if I do see a lot of bait, it's not long before a dragger zooms up and hammers it.

 

So, I get fish, I'm happy and I let them go.  And give thanks I'm doing it for fun, and not for a living.  Good luck!

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Go to the beach to find fish surfcasting, I see them all the time lol. Seriously, Its more about timing, tides, luck, technique, and time in than just finding fish.

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On 6/7/2018 at 11:10 PM, achase said:

My advice if you're new. Find structure as mentioned above but find it close to home or to the area most easily accessible to you. Fish it hard on both tides with the wind that seems most beneficial. Jumping around alot will not gain you much knowledge of how any spot works. If you've picked a spot that's popular then be polite, keep your distance but watch what others are doing. You'll be sure to meet some locals who you can ask for advice but be reasonable, it's rare that someone is going to spell it out completely for you. 

Buy stuff at your local tackle shop or the shop that's closest to the area you've chosen and ask for pointers. It takes time but just stick with it and success will come. 

Read Zeno Hromin's book Surfcasting with Lures, also John Skinner's book about fishing with bucktails, I forget the title.

Use NOAA charts on-line and google maps, they're helpful. Use NOAAs tide predictions for your spots. Windfinder for wind, sometimes it'll be right...

Good luck, don't lose faith. Don't drive when you're too tired, it's not worth it.

Your information is very helpful. thank you!

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