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If you take and combine the similar fish New Englanders call false albacore and Bonito, add in the regional names, go all around the seven seas, you'll be forever confused. 

 

Besides the two i mentioned, inshore warm water migrants called tuna but kinda mackerelish, there is a large off shore species just called albacore. 

We don't fish for them,  we buy them in cans.

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They do not, although the way things are going we will be slaying them  at the nubble lighthouse in 5 years Remember someone caught a sailfish in the canal a few years back. I caught albies on a charter down the cape last year and it was one of the most fun trips I've ever been on! 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Here are the 3 inshore  tunas for NE waters. Of course there's small bluefins also, not pictured.

 

1) False albacore, not considered good to eat.

 

2) Skip jack, least common inshore also not considered good eating.

 

3) Then the green Bonita, very good to eat.

falseAlbacore.jpg

skipjack-fishing.jpg

pmack-e1473782709607-690x515.png

Edited by peanutbunkerandjelly

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Posted (edited) · Report post

5 hours ago, Mainefishhunter7737 said:

I'm really confused what species of fish albies and false albacore are. Can somebody please clarify for me?

"The little tunny (Euthynnus alletteratus) is the most common tuna in the Atlantic Ocean." AKA False Albacore, Albie. 

 

"The Atlantic bonito (Sarda sarda) is a large mackerel-like fish of the family Scombridae."

 

The Scombridae family consists of the mackerels, tunas, and bonitos. Both fish are members of this family. Little tunny are tunas and Atlantic bonito are well bonito.

 

In Florida false albacore/little tunny are commonly referred to as bonito (sometimes bonita) by locals. The Florida FWC publications now refer to them as little tunny in an effort to clarify the actual species referenced since they are often confused with true bonitos by those familiar with both species. It is also necessary to make the distinction between the two species since Atlantic bonito sometimes inhabit the waters of the Atlantic coast of Florida along with little tunny.

 

Seldom does either species range north of Cape Cod however Atlantic Bonito have been documented in southern Maine waters on rare occasions.

Edited by GuiltyAsCharged

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Albies or Bonita, down here doesnt matter. Great fighters and great shark bait. Live chumming and top waters or flies is a blast. 

 

65A52E79-ECFC-4584-A999-CEB77B853F1C.thumb.jpeg.e4ec9e8a3b4f6052e8beedae9e823e69.jpeg

Edited by tomkaz

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1 min ago, tomkaz said:

Albies or Bonita, down here doesnt matter. Great fighters and great shark bait. Live chumming and top waters or flies is a blast. 

 

 

Now you've confused him all over again :)

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In my post I gave the OP the names the fish go by up here. But yes to further confuse, the southerners have other names for them. Particularly the false albacore, down south there albies,Bonita, bone heads...

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