Redpaste

Delaware beaches really flat?

44 posts in this topic

Can anyone tell me why Delaware beaches are really flat with very little structures, ie. rips, troughs, sandbars and only 1 wave that breaks on the lip of the beach?

 

Looking at pictures from AIMD/VA and Jersey beaches this is not the case.  They usually have several breakers, defined rips and very visible troughs. 

 

Is this because of beach replenishment? I'm definitely going to reconsider my beach tag for next year.  Most who own them don't even fish!

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, Redpaste said:

 

Is this because of beach replenishment? I'm definitely going to reconsider my beach tag for next year.  Most who own them don't even fish!

DE beaches are generally terrible for structure and the fishing is generally equally terrible. I don't fish there at all anymore during the migratory seasons. They are close to the house and I do enjoy them in the summer (when they don't turn into a parking lot) with the family and catch a few kingfish along the way.  In my mind I blame the horrific practice of replenishment but don't really know. 

Edited by Springer

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No natural deposit/shifting etc....no structure...at least for not very long

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Living in Long Island all my life and moving to Delaware in 05 was a big shocker. Surf fish sucks off the Delaware beaches. Places  like IR inlet hold bass, there are more bass in Delaware but not as big.  If you were a boater, then you would be getting more bass then anywhere else. You need to do some research. Look into back bays in Delaware or Delaware bay all the way in the back rivers. Big bass back there. No rips no rocks no sand bars. Bait is needed. 

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Lack of springs (underground aquifers) off Delaware beaches!

 

AI. has lots of springs surrounding it, bayside, surfside (some go out several miles), and on the island itself, the reason wild mammals can survive.

When you have a spring come up under water, it loosens the sand. The current will move that loose sand downstream, possibly creating a point, if close to surfs edge, or a hump if further out. With a direction change in current, it will build up another point or hump on the other side of the hole. The hole (deep spot) is where the spring is.

AI. has areas that are spring active most of the time (where most fishermen stack up) and other areas where the springs come and go.

There is a lot of info on this subject witch points to springs were responsible for the formation of barrier islands.

....just my $.02

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27 mins ago, Steve Coleman said:

Interesting....I never saw a spring at AI.  Maybe I"m not looking in the right place!

The ponds are spring fed. Most other springs are under water. Sometimes, in the right places, on a steep beach during low tide you can see water oozing out creating micro streams down to the surf, if paying attention.

Do an AI. aquifer search, just scratching the surface here!

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Posted (edited)

2 hours ago, Catskill John said:

Lack of springs (underground aquifers) off Delaware beaches!

 

AI. has lots of springs surrounding it, bayside, surfside (some go out several miles), and on the island itself, the reason wild mammals can survive.

When you have a spring come up under water, it loosens the sand. The current will move that loose sand downstream, possibly creating a point, if close to surfs edge, or a hump if further out. With a direction change in current, it will build up another point or hump on the other side of the hole. The hole (deep spot) is where the spring is.

AI. has areas that are spring active most of the time (where most fishermen stack up) and other areas where the springs come and go.

There is a lot of info on this subject witch points to springs were responsible for the formation of barrier islands.

....just my $.02

That's pretty cool, and somewhat unique I would think. Interesting and thanks for the info (although I have never fish AI beaches). :th:

 

I will be in Chincoteague for one night in a couple weeks, and if we get out to the beach (just staying for a rest on the way to Hatteras), I will look for some..

 

Edited by Steve in Mass

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From what I read, it's not that unique for a barrier island. Hatteras, although never there, probably has the same thing going on at places. 

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They're not flat, they're very steep. there is lots of unnatural replenishment there. Whiting ?:) like to group up in in sloughs. you can catch a july lunch easy by back-dragging down into a DE slough. whereas you may need the heavers to reach them on AI.

 

Interesting about the springs on AI, I never knew that!  

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I will be down there next weekend and will let you know. Wife and I celebrate our anniversary  down in Rehoboth every year. This will be the first time I have wet a line.

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On 5/20/2018 at 0:45 PM, Catskill John said:

From what I read, it's not that unique for a barrier island. Hatteras, although never there, probably has the same thing going on at places. 

 

 

Ya know, was thinking about this morning as I was driving around for work. Off of Avon on HI, we go swimming, and the water is usually 78-80 when we are down.....bath water. But every so often as you would drift, you would run into a cool pocket.

 

I always passed it off as just up-welling and turbulence of just cooler ocean water, but perhaps it is the spring vents you have spoken of. 

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I grew up here in Delaware, as soon as I could drive I was down the beach every weekend spending time being a typical teen trying to catch something, and some in the mornings I would fish.  From cape all the way down to FI including an "inlet in Delaware".  I went out this week and noticed the beach was flatter then I can ever recall.  The amount of steep elevation from low to hide was not as noticeable as it typically is. Usually I am able to find something, some type of wash out a dip in the waves, but this weekend was different.  

 

I do believe that in school I read and was taught about how sand moves and coastlines always shifting.  The replenishments that are always on going here in Delaware destroy what I could have sworn was a natural process, building a sandbar several hundred yards off shore that break down large waves created by storms prior to hitting the coast.  I guess we are suppose to just move those bars on shore so it looks pretty then when a storm comes and does not have any sand bars out in the ocean we have 10+ foot waves eat away at the coast line? Sorry i know it may be a little off topic but wouldn't that help the structure build here in Delaware.  Get away from the shore break that is always here and make it more like AI, HI, or even jersey?

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Am I crazy to think that I remember Fenwick having an outer bar and a more gradual slope (not the quick drop off/shore break most DE beaches have)?  I swear as a kid when my parents took us there it was much different.  This would have been the mid-nineties to mid 2000s.

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51 mins ago, Steve in Mass said:

Ya know, was thinking about this morning as I was driving around for work. Off of Avon on HI, we go swimming, and the water is usually 78-80 when we are down.....bath water. But every so often as you would drift, you would run into a cool pocket.

 

I always passed it off as just up-welling and turbulence of just cooler ocean water, but perhaps it is the spring vents you have spoken of. 

 

 

I often have very similar experiences while swimming in Delaware, make of that what you will.

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