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FunkyBunker

Riding Mower attachments

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I put this in the DIY too but not many people playing around in there. Do you guys have any of the attachments for you riding mowers like the plug aerators, dethatchers or cheap looking disc harrows? Wondering if they are worth the investment or if they are junk and fall apart. I'm not paying someone to come in and do this stuff if i can just spend and extra $1,000 on some accessories. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I used to have a plug aerator back when I was in the lawn care business.  It worked great.  Wish I still had it.  Got it at Lowes for $75.

Edited by Bullred44

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I have half acre and i use a sweeper to collect my clippings. A dethatcher (double row) that i weight down with cinder blocks that works very well.  The aerator i use sucks and is the cheap star kind.  I imagine if i spent more and got a good plug one it would be better but i Pretty much use the dethatcher to rip everything up.  I will probably pay someone this year to core aerate and seed professionally just to have it done every few years.   I keep on top of it as much as i can and this year it looks pretty good so far but its still early yet.

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First you need to determine whether you need any of those attachments. I was a golf course superintendent for 35 years and most home lawns don't need aeration or dethatching. A lot depends on the level of fertility that you like. If you feed a lot or overfertilize you can generate excessive growth which causes problems. What kind of grass do you have on your lawn, if it's zoysia or some type of bermuda then you will need thatching and aeration. The common rolling type of pull behind aerators won't do much for compaction, they will pull shallow thatch plugs but then you need to drag the plugs to break them up and collect them or the organic matter just goes back into the lawn. Pull behind thatchers also don't do much, if you need to thatch rent a motorized one. Don't aerate or thatch after you have applied preemergent crabgrass control, my neighbor just did this and broke the chemical barrier which means he will have poor control. Bottom line, check to see if you have excessive thatch before you do anything. If you have a well thought out fertilization plan (don't feed heavily first thing in the spring no matter what Scotts says) you should not have a thatch problem.

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I have a lawn sweeper? that does a pretty good job, it hates sticks though, but you dont have to rake leaves, also had the small scrapper blade when i had horses , it also did a pretty good job aswell, 

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5 mins ago, redfishkiller said:

I have a lawn sweeper? that does a pretty good job, it hates sticks though, but you dont have to rake leaves, also had the small scrapper blade when i had horses , it also did a pretty good job aswell, 

i prefer the sweeper to the bags as well.     i hate leaving clippings on the lawn.

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3 hours ago, MikeBlue said:

First you need to determine whether you need any of those attachments. I was a golf course superintendent for 35 years and most home lawns don't need aeration or dethatching. A lot depends on the level of fertility that you like. If you feed a lot or overfertilize you can generate excessive growth which causes problems. What kind of grass do you have on your lawn, if it's zoysia or some type of bermuda then you will need thatching and aeration. The common rolling type of pull behind aerators won't do much for compaction, they will pull shallow thatch plugs but then you need to drag the plugs to break them up and collect them or the organic matter just goes back into the lawn. Pull behind thatchers also don't do much, if you need to thatch rent a motorized one. Don't aerate or thatch after you have applied preemergent crabgrass control, my neighbor just did this and broke the chemical barrier which means he will have poor control. Bottom line, check to see if you have excessive thatch before you do anything. If you have a well thought out fertilization plan (don't feed heavily first thing in the spring no matter what Scotts says) you should not have a thatch problem.

Property was vacant for 5 or 6 years so a lot of crap grew in. Front and back yards aren't bad except for clover and other normal weeds. The field is my problem. Roughly the size of a football field and at one point was used for horses. Think it grew in for about 6 years before i took a kubota and 72" brush hog through it. Been cleaning it up and took a brush hog through it 3 times in past 2 years. Going to gain a better hold on it this year once i get my mower. Since i've been at it some of the nastier stuff has stopped growing and better grass has come up, no clue what type, but there's also some clumpy crap and bunch of Broomsedge growing through out. I haven't done any kind of treatment to it yet, but definitely think a gas dethatcher would be the way to start out. I'm not going for perfection, just some good polishing. 

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Thats huge to do by hand.  And a cheap attachment is not the way i would go.  If you have a brushog then maybe you have an atv?  Id get a good attachment for it if so

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Posted (edited) · Report post

That's a monster job. I would say mow it regularly and see what you've got. Obviously it's not irrigated so it will probably burn out every summer. The drought resistant grasses should take over. Crabgrass might be problem but hey, it will take the heat so you might want to let go, at least for a while, you can control it later if you want. If you want to treat the broadleaf weeds and clover think about a backpack sprayer for spot applications, the granulars don't work very well for this. With a piece of land that big you are going to want to avoid overfertilizing because it will give you a massive clipping problem if you get some wet weather and can't get on it with the mower. You might think about a used commercial mower rather than the garden tractor type. Back when I got started in the GC business I worked at a course that didn't have irrigated fairways, the boss couldn't wait for some summer heat to cook the turf so he could stop mowing, I have hunch that might be you!

Edited by MikeBlue

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