Seal

Teen Sent to Prison for Defending Home from Intruders—Because The Intruders Were Cops

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Austin, TX – When a SWAT team initiated a no-knock raid in search of cannabis, they were met with gunfire, and while the resident surrendered as soon as he realized his home was being raided by police, the fact that he opened fire on the intruders and shot one of them in the leg has resulted in a 13-year prison sentence.

When a SWAT team broke down the door and charged into the Harrell family’s house in the early morning hours of April 14, 2016, they claimed that the intrusive operation was justified, because they believed 18-year-old Tyler Harrell was running a drug ring out of his parents’ home.

 

When Tyler Harrell was woken up by what he believed were burglars breaking into his home, he did what many gun owners would do, and he grabbed his firearm and confronted the intruders. He used his legally-owned AK-47, and while he did not kill any of the officers, he did wound one officer by shooting him in the knee.

 

Lisa Harrell told KVUE News that she believes her son only opened fire because he thought his family was being robbed. “[Tyler] came running out with his gun, thinking someone was intruding in our house, and he started shooting down the stairs,” she said. “I know my son thought there was an intruder in the house.”

Hours after the shooting, police confirmed that “another SWAT team member returned fire, but did not hit Harrell, who surrendered to police within minutes,” indicating that as soon as Harrell realized he was firing at police officers, he stopped and let them arrest him without a fight.

 

When officers searched the home, they found one ounce of cannabis, which would justify a misdemeanor charge against Harrell. However, because the officers initiated a no-knock raid before dawn, and Harrell attempted to protect his family from the intruders, he was charged with attempted capital murder.

 

During the trial, Harrell’s psychiatrist testified that at the time of the shooting, he was “suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder after an incident four months earlier in which he and his friends were robbed by a masked gunman,” and the gunman shot Harrell, before Harrell “wrested the gun away from the man and chased him out the door of his friend’s apartment,” according to a report from the Austin Statesman.

 

However, it was the testimony from Officer James Pittman that apparently pulled at the heartstrings of jury members. He was the only person injured by Harrell’s gunfire, and he said the bullet wound in his leg kept him from playing with his kids now and would force him to get knee replacement surgery one day.

 

Pittman also criticized the “Not Guilty” verdict from another Texas case in which a homeowner shot and wounded three police officers when they initiated a no-knock raid on his house. Ray Rosas spent nearly two years in jail awaiting his trial, and his actions were ruled justified based on the fact that he was acting in self-defense and did not know the intruders he was shooting were police officers.

 

Rosas was acquitted, despite the fact that 11 police officers testified against him. However, in the case of Tyler Harrell, his lawyer argued that the 18 SWAT team members who attended court in tactical gear to show their support for Officer Pittman, further demonized Harrell in the eyes of the jury.

 

“Look at this gallery. You don’t think this is a lot of political pressure for these people?” Lawyer Michael Chandler told the jury.

 

The pressure worked, and while the jury determined that Tyler Harrell was not guilty of attempted capital murder or aggravated assault on a public servant, he was found guilty of aggravated assault and sentenced to 13 years and six months in prison, and a fine of $7,000.

 

When the trial shifted to a debate over whether Harrell acted in self-defense, it served as a distraction from the fact that the drug raid on his home was an absolute failure, and officers were never able to prove that Harrell was a “large drug dealer” of marijuana and cocaine, which was the claim they used to justify obtaining a search warrant for the raid in the first place.

 

 

I feel so much safer knowing that there's home invading psychopaths walking the streets, protecting me from the marijuanas.

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On-duty police pack court as jury sentences man who shot APD officer

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Uniformed Austin police officers irked the defense and some court watchers Thursday by flooding the courtroom for the sentencing of a suspected drug dealer who shot a SWAT officer in 2016.

 

Tyler Harrell, who fired 23 times from an AK-47-style rifle during a police raid of his family’s home, received 13½ years in prison.

 

The 18 SWAT team members who attended court to support injured officer James Pittman wore camouflage or dark green tactical gear, raising questions about whether their presence influenced jurors. Many of the same officers were in the courtroom last week when lawyers presented closing arguments.

 

The spectacle caught the attention of Harrell’s lawyer, Michael Chandler, who motioned to the officers and told the jury, “Look at this gallery. You don’t think this is a lot of political pressure for these people?”

Interim Austin Police Chief Brian Manley said in a statement that he allowed the officers, who were on duty, to go to the trial after a request from prosecutors.

 

“Since this trial involved a SWAT operation and many of the officers had testified during the trial, their attendance at closing arguments and sentencing was appropriate,” Manley said. “This gave them the opportunity to hear testimony over their tactics that day as well as supporting a fellow officer who was seriously injured in this incident.”

 

Police officers commonly attend trials in which their colleagues are defendants or victims, and appeals courts have generally ruled that it is their right to do so. Thursday’s hearing, however, was unusual because the officers were on the clock, being paid to attend a portion of the trial they were not involved in, experts said. The officers were in court for about two hours.

 

“That’s highly unusual, and I think it’s worthy of an investigation,” said Gloria Browne-Marshall, a professor at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York. “They’re supposed to be out there protecting the community, and they’re sitting inside a courtroom, not being there to be called as witnesses but to influence a jury, which is not their job.”

 

 

Yeah, this isn't jury intimidation or anything. :rolleyes:

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Isn't it a felony to possess a firearm if you use/possess illegal drugs? I know that's specifically against the law in TX. 

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4 mins ago, Niffty said:

Isn't it a felony to possess a firearm if you use/possess illegal drugs? I know that's specifically against the law in TX. 

Under federal law you can't own guns if you use weed. Even in states where weed is legal.

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Harrell still faces significant prison time for aggravated assault — a charge that makes no distinction between whether he shot at a police officer or an intruder. Harrell, armed with an AK-47 style rifle, fired at police 23 times.

 

So is your issue that he's going to jail for hearing a noise then blindly shooting 23 AK rounds down a staircase or that on duty cops attended the trial? 

 

 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

9 mins ago, blastwater said:

Harrell still faces significant prison time for aggravated assault — a charge that makes no distinction between whether he shot at a police officer or an intruder. Harrell, armed with an AK-47 style rifle, fired at police 23 times.

 

So is your issue that he's going to jail for hearing a noise then blindly shooting 23 AK rounds down a staircase or that on duty cops attended the trial? 

 

 

That armed thugs kick down doors to "defend society", from weed...And that armed thugs are allowed to openly intimidate juries.

Edited by Seal

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3 mins ago, Seal said:

That armed thugs kick down doors to "defend society", from weed...And that armed thugs are allowed to openly intimidate juries.

And an assault weapon that he was not allowed to own. 

 

If they intimidated the jury, it didn't work as he was cleared of the most serious "cop specific" charges: 

Reaching a verdict Monday after more than 14 hours of deliberations, the jury cleared Harrell of the most serious charge against him, attempted capital murder of a police officer, as well as lesser charges of attempted murder and aggravated assault of a public servant.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

8 mins ago, blastwater said:

And an assault weapon that he was not allowed to own. 

 

If they intimidated the jury, it didn't work as he was cleared of the most serious "cop specific" charges: 

Reaching a verdict Monday after more than 14 hours of deliberations, the jury cleared Harrell of the most serious charge against him, attempted capital murder of a police officer, as well as lesser charges of attempted murder and aggravated assault of a public servant.

 

Let's make it simple...

I'd feel safer with these cops locked in a cage and the pothead who owns a "scawy looking gun", walking free.

 

Edited by Seal

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Find me 10 cases over the last 50 years in a country of 300 million people where a "normal" citizen had a SWAT team break down their door.....find me 2, how's that?

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6 mins ago, HopHead said:

Find me 10 cases over the last 50 years in a country of 300 million people where a "normal" citizen had a SWAT team break down their door.....find me 2, how's that?

Google "swat team wrong house".

I'm not posting all the links.

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Also google "Robert Harte marijuana raid".

He and his wife, both retired CIA agents, had their home raided by Gestapo pigs...Because they purchased indoor growing equipment to grow tomatoes as a science project with their son.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

You should try reading one of my threads...Instead of proudly proclaiming that you didn't even read the article, but will just assume that I'm wrong...Because you don't want me to be right. :)

Edited by Seal

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41 mins ago, Seal said:

Let's make it simple...

I'd feel safer.............

 

The starting point for literally every single Liberal argument that plagues our culture.................

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