Gilbey

The Beekeeping Thread

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And this is what you end up with.

 

Essentially white wine if you make a straight mead.

Or some fruit flavored wine if you add in various fruits. 

This is the result of my raspberry wine.

 

I have made three batches.

#1 - an OK straight mead.  Sort of generic brew.  Nothing to write home about.

#2 - a not as OK mead made with cranraisins.  This stuff is getting better with age.  But not fast enough.  Tastes a bit like cough syrup.  This may still get dumped.

#3 - the double batch of raspberry mead.  This has potential.  I am going to let it age for a while.  Started it in July.

 

So far You Tube has been my instructor.  Might need to find an old Italian bee keeper to really learn the ropes.

 

 

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Do you or someone you know have one of these heat units?  If so do you have a first person testimonial as to how it worked and if there were any ill effects?  If so I would really like to hear it.

 

So I did look up their web page based on your mention of this.  The study that they have on there is hard to read and not a real controlled study.  Also their instructions are poorly written and hard to follow.  All of this does not inspire confidence.

 

Seems you need to have this unit on the hive for over 2 hours.  So that would require a generator if the hives are not near a power source and a long time to go through a bunch of hives unless you had several units.  Also seems that they want you to do this in summer with temps over 80F if you have double deep hives.  Oh and the unit cost $300!

 

When compared to an oxalic dribble or oxalic vapor treatment - it seems expensive and time consuming.  Also not sure I understand the potential risks to the queen, her future (production and life span) the brood at all stages (egg, larva, capped pupa) and to the actual honeycomb.  I know wax melts at about 140F so this should be well under that - but when does it sag and become misshaped especially when loaded with brood or honey stores?

 

So - my gut instinct is to wait until I hear that there are more studies and until I hear that this is more generally accepted.

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join their facebook page, plenty of testimonials there.

 

yes, i have the 10frame mighty mite thermal treatment. been using it for a year.

no problem with queen laying, one queen lays on 2 deeps at staggering pace. broodbox 9 frame full of brood, deep super 6 frames of brood. treated 2x this year.

 

 

 

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On 11/20/2019 at 7:18 AM, HellRaY said:

i would encourage you to look at heat thermal treatment for varroa.

 

Not an expert by any means but Thymol can be used for mites, and many introduce thyme herb over winter. Planting thyme, oregano, marjoram, rosemary, lavender, catnip lemon balm, etc. around the hives can go a long way. 

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On 11/23/2019 at 5:55 PM, HellRaY said:

yes, i have the 10frame mighty mite thermal treatment. been using it for a year.

 

 

So how do you control the temperature throughout the hive?  Seems you would want to be very precise with that.  This seems to be a heat from the bottom deal - which seems to me would be a large thermal gradient.  Some too hot - some too cool and only some just right.

 

Or is it really not that sensitive?

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Interesting stuff, thank you all for sharing your knowledge and experience. I wrapped my hives over the weekend. They have a small entrance at the bottom and a 3/4" hole at the top for access and ventilation. This is how I did it last year, and it worked, so I decided not to mess with success;

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I have made several batches of mead. I found I prefer still, plain mead. It's simple, and I think it allows the flavor and aroma of the honey to shine. I have a couple bottles that are approaching 10 years old. I like to pull one out around the holidays to sip and share. Not something I would drink everyday, but it's fun to make. 

Edited by Gilbey

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That looks like it will work fine.

Remember it is not the cold that kills the bees it is moisture condensing on the top board and dripping back down into the hive.

With that vent hole you likely have some reasonable circulation for the air so that you can avoid condensation.

The other reason for an upper entrance is if the bottom one gets blocked by dead bees or by snow they have a way out for cleansing flights on a warm day.

I find that some sort of windbreak is helpful.  So your insulation can provide that.  Just do not seal it up tight.

 

I do a loose wrap with tar paper and then add some additional wind break.  Seems to help as opposed to not wrapping at all.

 

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1 min ago, Skeeterbait said:

That looks like it will work fine.

Remember it is not the cold that kills the bees it is moisture condensing on the top board and dripping back down into the hive.

With that vent hole you likely have some reasonable circulation for the air so that you can avoid condensation.

The other reason for an upper entrance is if the bottom one gets blocked by dead bees or by snow they have a way out for cleansing flights on a warm day.

I find that some sort of windbreak is helpful.  So your insulation can provide that.  Just do not seal it up tight.

 

I do a loose wrap with tar paper and then add some additional wind break.  Seems to help as opposed to not wrapping at all.

 

God advice! I had 24 hives in Vermont never wrapped them. The moisture is the killer and vent holes seemed to work fine. Shoveling the snow away was important 

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:th:

 

Seems like most beekeepers in my area do not wrap. It's just what I did last year, so I did it again, and it was just a $20 sheet of insulation, the rest I had laying around. 

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7 hours ago, mybosox3 said:

God advice! I had 24 hives in Vermont never wrapped them. The moisture is the killer and vent holes seemed to work fine. Shoveling the snow away was important 

I love it when someone thinks my advice is God advice......Sort of makes me feel important......

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2 mins ago, Skeeterbait said:

I love it when someone thinks my advice is God advice......Sort of makes me feel important......

Good not God... Good advice

 

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Anyone ever taken a photo of their winter hives with a FLIR camera.

Just found out that they have ones you clip onto your cell phone for not too much money.

Might be a good way to monitor them through the winter.

 

Perfect Prime on Amazon for $110.  Might need to tell Santa......

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