Mainiac

Salt ponds question.

Rate this topic

59 posts in this topic

For years I've wanted to visit R.I. to fish those fabled salt ponds you have. I've read as much as I can find about them but nothing beats experience. 

My question is : When do the worm hatches usually begin ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes come that distance to listen to a bazillion micros slurp worms and refuse every offering you can possibly think of to throw. 

 

Don't they have worm hatches in Maine?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 mins ago, mikez2 said:

Yes come that distance to listen to a bazillion micros slurp worms and refuse every offering you can possibly think of to throw

 

Don't they have worm hatches in Maine?

 

 

X2 for the Truth. :rav:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, on the down low, here's how to make the best of the salt pond worm hatch;

 

First, wait till it's warm. Then....

 

Get you a bottle of hot sauce, a couple lemons and stout pocket knife.

Very important safety tip: also aquire adequate supply of potent adult beverage  - for medicinal purposes. Then.....

 

Go to salt pond before sun set. Slather on extra deet. These aren't Maine salt marsh mosquitoes but they're still salt marsh mosquitoes. Then....

 

Sample the beverage, put the rest on ice with hot sauce and lemon. Then....

 

Find the black mud. The oooiegooey shoe sucking stink mud. Take off your shoes. Wade into the muck. Then...

 

After it gets dark, cast to bazillion micros and not micros till your arm hurts. Enjoy the sight and sound of so many stripers. Enjoy casting practice. Move often. While doing that....

 

Feel for hard smooth lumps in the mud under your bare toes. When you surrender to the inevitability of your skunking, start picking up those hard lumps in the mud. Those are quohogs. Now you are not skunked. Finally....

 

Take a dozen, go back to the car, crack those bad boys with pocket knife, hot sauce and lemon, bang. A couple chilled shots to keep the bacteria honest.

 

That's how to enjoy a SoCo worm hatch.:shaky:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 mins ago, mikez2 said:

Ok, on the down low, here's how to make the best of the salt pond worm hatch;

 

First, wait till it's warm. Then....

 

Get you a bottle of hot sauce, a couple lemons and stout pocket knife.

Very important safety tip: also aquire adequate supply of potent adult beverage  - for medicinal purposes. Then.....

 

Go to salt pond before sun set. Slather on extra deet. These aren't Maine salt marsh mosquitoes but they're still salt marsh mosquitoes. Then....

 

Sample the beverage, put the rest on ice with hot sauce and lemon. Then....

 

Find the black mud. The oooiegooey shoe sucking stink mud. Take off your shoes. Wade into the muck. Then...

 

After it gets dark, cast to bazillion micros and not micros till your arm hurts. Enjoy the sight and sound of so many stripers. Enjoy casting practice. Move often. While doing that....

 

Feel for hard smooth lumps in the mud under your bare toes. When you surrender to the inevitability of your skunking, start picking up those hard lumps in the mud. Those are quohogs. Now you are not skunked. Finally....

 

Take a dozen, go back to the car, crack those bad boys with pocket knife, hot sauce and lemon, bang. A couple chilled shots to keep the bacteria honest.

 

That's how to enjoy a SoCo worm hatch.:shaky:

hahah great advice! love me some quahogs tho

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, mikez2 said:

Yes come that distance to listen to a bazillion micros slurp worms and refuse every offering you can possibly think of to throw. 

 

Don't they have worm hatches in Maine?

 

 

X3...it can be one of the most frustrating fishing experiences that you can have.  I would not make the trip for it, if it was me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

It's compelling to see it go hard. Difficult to resist trying. 

 

Made worse by charter captains talking it up and selling it to "Match The Hatch" traditional trout style flyfishermen. Especially inlanders succumbing to glossy web or print fish porn.

 

Match the hatch is all well and good...and it's primarily skilled flyfishermen who have any success at all...but when there's fifty billion worms and it's dark, your awesome fly and perfect presentation will not impress those fish.

 

Edit: I wasn't putting Mainiac in the above category, just speaking general. 

I follow Mainiac's posts in the Maine forum. He doesn't need any help catching. 

Edited by mikez2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a spectacle worth experiencing. Best advice I've read (but not tried) is to fish the start and/or end of the nightly hatch.  Could guess, but not sure of the time frame for the salt ponds

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, mikez2 said:

Ok, on the down low, here's how to make the best of the salt pond worm hatch;

 

First, wait till it's warm. Then....

 

Get you a bottle of hot sauce, a couple lemons and stout pocket knife.

Very important safety tip: also aquire adequate supply of potent adult beverage  - for medicinal purposes. Then.....

 

Go to salt pond before sun set. Slather on extra deet. These aren't Maine salt marsh mosquitoes but they're still salt marsh mosquitoes. Then....

 

Sample the beverage, put the rest on ice with hot sauce and lemon. Then....

 

Find the black mud. The oooiegooey shoe sucking stink mud. Take off your shoes. Wade into the muck. Then...

 

After it gets dark, cast to bazillion micros and not micros till your arm hurts. Enjoy the sight and sound of so many stripers. Enjoy casting practice. Move often. While doing that....

 

Feel for hard smooth lumps in the mud under your bare toes. When you surrender to the inevitability of your skunking, start picking up those hard lumps in the mud. Those are quohogs. Now you are not skunked. Finally....

 

Take a dozen, go back to the car, crack those bad boys with pocket knife, hot sauce and lemon, bang. A couple chilled shots to keep the bacteria honest.

 

That's how to enjoy a SoCo worm hatch.:shaky:

Good advice but I'd finish off the potent adult beverages much earlier in the process. :p

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, quack said:

It's a spectacle worth experiencing. Best advice I've read (but not tried) is to fish the start and/or end of the nightly hatch.  Could guess, but not sure of the time frame for the salt ponds

Spectacle is a good word for it. 200 Trout Fly Fisherman going up against 5.7 Billion tiny worms...exercise in futility. I know some guys get them during the hatch, but it is lopsided at best.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The worm swarm activities in the salt ponds in itself is it's own enigma.

Don't expect frantic striped bass fishing to happen in the salt ponds.

Truth be told, you can catch more and bigger stripers fishing around the bay in early May.

Lately most all stripers on the worm swarm have been on the small side. Years ago you had a chance to catch bigger fish. Those are not present anymore.

 

It is though unique. If you like quite times and safe wading conditions it is a pristine place to be with children or older adults.

If you like pure fly fishing, the experience is wonderful. Decades ago I coined the phrase, The closest experience to saltwater dry fly fishing. 

Unfortunately, I hear that same phrase copied by others with no do credit.  Would you do a pay charter?  Maybe once, than you soon see there is little return for your money.

Hundreds of cast yield few hook-ups and smaller fish. You soon learn you can do it on your own by wading or having a kayak and have better luck due to your own vision and freedom to paddle anywhere you want. 

 

We use the pond to illustrate what the location has to offer to Rhode Islanders. It is a jewel of a place with many interesting sights and sounds. It is a great place to take beginners.        

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.