Malatesta0812

Jigs for Plug Bulding

Rate this topic

17 posts in this topic

Hi All,

As I am newly started on this venture of making my own plugs, I imagine that a lot of you build your own jigs and fixtures. Which do you find the most helpful/useful and which would you recommend that I make first? Any drawings/photos/dimensions of the jigs It would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for all the help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As you make plugs of different styles you'll realize what jigs you need to help you. Most guys have jigs for cutting lip slots, belly holes, angle cuts and even center punches. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here ya go. I do most things by hand but the center finder is one of the basic things I use. Insert end tap tap. Spin 90 degrees tap tap. Works on square and round. The marker is a hacksaw blade epoxied into a 2x

 

 

9ECA2478-CA42-4557-BFE6-5FF374DC5EA9.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A V block is something that you will use it for many things. Mine is a little overkill and made of aluminum but one made of hard wood will work perfect. 

04157B98-D204-4382-8E14-EB3E855080A7.jpeg

B2E33202-9082-410E-A9E5-F905B69ECF2D.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can use a wedge of wood or an adjustable screw to raise and lower the end  of the plug too. Doesn’t have to be too fancy.   A stop on other end so you can load plugs in fixture is important too if your doing a bunch. The reason for raising and lowering the plug is so you can drill belly holes perfectly perpendicular to where the hole goes into the wood no matter if it is a flat surface or a contoured surface. That way you belly grommets will sit on plug flat on both sides. I hate when I see a plug where grommet hits on one side and other side not. It does not matter if the hole goes into the thru wire hole at an angle. 

You will want to have a stop on other side of fixture so you can load multiple plugs into fixture if your doing a bunch. 

You should also make a fence for your drill press so you can slide the fixture along the fence and move to other areas on plug you may want to drill for eyes, belly wgt’s,multiple belly holes and such. Once you find center of the V in the block and are against the fence no matter where you slide the V block it will be on center of the V and the plug no matter of the diameter of the plug. 

I do all my subsequent machining of my plugs off my belly holes. All my fixtures are designed  on using pins in the belly holes to mount on fixtures. I am not a fan of leaving square ends on turned plugs to do my fixturing. Not saying it is a bad technique as many do it just

not for me. I prefer working off belly holes. It is a more time consuming technique but more precision IMO. The mass

prducers of plugs will probably not use this method as they need quickness which is understandable. I probably look at fixturing differently than most as I have been building them for 40 years as a machinist so I tend to look for the most efficient and versatile fixture that will yield the most precision results. Just how I am wired. A lot of time I have more fun making the jigs and fixtures than the plugs.  As with anything choose what is most comfortable for you. Doesn’t have to be fancy just easy to use and will repeat the results. Paul. 

Edited by Steel Pulse

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 mins ago, Steel Pulse said:

You can use a wedge of wood or an adjustable screw to raise and lower the end  of the plug too. Doesn’t have to be too fancy.   A stop on other end so you can load plugs in fixture is important too if your doing a bunch. The reason for raising and lowering the plug is so you can drill belly holes perfectly perpendicular to where the hole goes into the wood no matter if it is a flat surface or a contoured surface. That way you belly grommets will sit on plug flat on both sides. I hate when I see a plug where grommet hits on one side and other side not. It does not matter if the hole goes into the thru wire hole at an angle. 

You will want to have a stop on other side of fixture so you can load multiple plugs into fixture if your doing a bunch. 

You should also make a fence for your drill press so you can slide the fixture along the fence and move to other areas on plug you may want to drill for eyes, belly wgt’s,multiple belly holes and such. Once you find center of the V in the block and are against the fence no matter where you slide the V block it will be on center of the V and the plug no matter of the diameter of the plug. 

I do all my subsequent machining of my plugs off my belly holes. All my fixtures are designed  on using pins in the belly holes to mount on fixtures. I am not a fan of leaving square ends on turned plugs to do my fixturing. Not saying it is a bad technique as many do it just

not for me. I prefer working off belly holes. It is a more time consuming technique but more precision IMO. The mass

prducers of plugs will probably not use this method as they need quickness which is understandable. I probably look at fixturing differently than most as I have been building them for 40 years as a machinist so I tend to look for the most efficient and versatile fixture that will yield the most precision results. Just how I am wired. A lot of time I have more fun making the jigs and fixtures than the plugs.  As with anything choose what is most comfortable for you. Doesn’t have to be fancy just easy to use and will repeat the results. Paul. 

Thank you for explaining to us how you 'tick', it totally makes sense to me! I'm just getting started myself so I'm still trying to figure out the most efficient method to make the most of my time in the shop, as with everything that window of time seems to get smaller and smaller everyday! I started using a v-block myself and it definitely helps, but the other aspects you use are definitely thought provoking. Thanks again!

 

 - Kevin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I have a hard time finding the time to build too. I only build during the  winter. I much prefer fishing and when the fish show up I close up operations. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you gentleman, that is a great start. Steel that is an awesome V-block jig! very well thought out and executed. Is that V-block cut at a 45 degree angle? Does anyone have a jig for cutting flat bottom poppers and Darters? Thanks again for all the help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pulse's V-block is more intricate and valuable than any/all equipment in my entire workshop

 

A push-sled is good to cut bevels on your table/jig/band saws. I also use a jig to smooth bevels and push them against the disk portion of my belt sander, after pushing them thru my table saw.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.