BrianBM

Cold water sharks

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A question, as usual.

 

The Greenland shark is, AFAIK, the shark with the greatest preference for cold, cold water.  If you go down deep enough, the water's cold year-round. A Greenland shark was caught, at some insane depth, in the Gulf of Mexico a year or two ago; that's not a location associated with ice floes and beluga whales.

 

Has any winter boat out of Massachusetts ever caught one?  

 

Maine might be more likely, since the GOM offers greater water depths, but let's start here.

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Occurrence in the Gulf of Maine—

Although there is no reason to suppose that the Greenland shark ever appears in our Gulf save as a straggler from the north, its presence there has been signalized on a number of occasions. Two specimens, for example, were taken in the neighborhood of St. Andrews in 1915 (one caught in a weir and the other on a long line). It has been reported off Eastport; off Cape Elizabeth whence 6 were landed at Portland between 1925 and 1948;[48] on Jeffreys Ledge, where one of about 15 feet was caught on a long line, on February 16, 1931;[49] near Cape Ann; off Marblehead and Nahant; in Massachusetts Bay; off Barnstable in Cape Cod Bay; at Provincetown; and in Cape Cod Bay off the entrance to the Cape Cod Canal, where one between 10 and 11 feet long was taken by a trawler in April 1924, landed in Boston and identified by us.

Recorded captures in the Gulf include small specimens as well as large, and have been for all four seasons of the year, suggesting that when a Greenland shark does stray southward to the Gulf, it may survive there for years. The local records are distributed so widely as to show that an odd specimen is to be expected anywhere in the deeper parts of the Gulf. And rumor has it that they were more numerous in our waters in early colonial times when Atlantic right whales were still being killed in numbers off the Massachusetts coast.[50]

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Thank you.  Interesting as heck.....

 

One of the better episodes of "River Monsters" concerned the Loch Ness monster.  The host went to Iceland, where he sampled fermented Greenland shark, and eventually to a Norwegian Fjord where he caught one. He also pulled up some very deep-water ray.  

 

His description of the fermented shark left me with no desire to sample it.  It's one of those things that perhaps you have to be Icelandic or Norse to like.  It does leave me wondering, a bit, what other sub-arctic exotica might wander south in the winter.
 

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Was an old article (with pics)  of men fishing through a hole (large to X-large) through the ice ,fishing and catching large sharks  maybe a Greenland or 6-gill? Gotta be a way to recover it, ill say Saltwater Sportsman, but i'm not sure. If you can find it, it's worth the search. Bizarre.

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There are a lot of fish I'd want to catch first. Greenland I'll leave it to the Inuit, and they can have the sharks too.

 

I think that fermented shark meat is "tipnuk." 

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7 hours ago, BrianBM said:

His description of the fermented shark left me with no desire to sample it.  It's one of those things that perhaps you have to be Icelandic or Norse to like.

 

Yeah. Pretty uniform taste description of "Kæstur hákarl" (fermented Greenland Shark) across the board amongst western-raised taste buds. Common theme is it tastes strongly of rotten urea/animal-piss crossed with blue-cheese x 1 million. 

 

I've heard it described as the most disgusting thing some have ever smelled and/or tasted.

Sounds delightful.

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On ‎1‎/‎12‎/‎2018 at 7:28 PM, rst3 said:

.......... Common theme is it tastes strongly of rotten urea/animal-piss crossed with blue-cheese x 1 million. .........

 

Which in part explains why the Inuit believe that the Greenland shark lives within the urine pot of Sedna, goddess of the sea.    :read: 

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On 1/14/2018 at 5:34 PM, Joe G said:

 

Which in part explains why the Inuit believe that the Greenland shark lives within the urine pot of Sedna, goddess of the sea.    :read: 

By that logic I’m wondering why they’d even try to eat it, let alone fermented. Isn’t that just letting it rot? 

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Not a rotten pissmeat expert here.. but I think I read the point of fermenting/rotting the shark was to at least take the "edge off" the urine compounds, while adding all those complex and flavorful rot notes. Still dont understand why folks would line up for (reduced!)urine-flavored decomposed shark meat. 

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What you'll eat depends on how hungry you are.  The Vikings who established this as a tradition were coming from a part of the world with a short growing season.  

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