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Peter D

Early European Spinning Reel Designs

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Just finished taking apart, cleaning and reassembling/lubing two Alcedo 2C/S spinning reels that's used in SW. The early European (esp. Italian) designs had little regard for assembly/re-assembly effort. There's a small screw that holds the handle shaft assembly in place that's the size of a screw used in the innards of small wrist watches.The bail release ever spring takes the patience of Job to remove, clean and re-install w/o permanently damaging it. In addition, all of the external parts are not "SW friendly". 

There are 112 parts that make up the 2C/S parts list! Fortunately I ordered a number of small parts for spares back in "84. Now to find where I stored them. 

I believe the replacement for the 2C/S (Alcedo 2002) never reached the market. I was sent two of these reels to evaluate back in '84 -which I did. The design was much simpler. Interestingly, the spool was plastic and of external skirt design and had all the auto bail return parts protected from exposure.

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Was the 2CS made of bakelite?  I was looking at a couple pictures and at least one had that swirly blue bakelite appearance.

I'm sure the designers were all out of work clockmakers who lived far from the shore.

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The 2CS body was a casting

 The ALCEDO 2002, i.e., the 2CS "replacement's" body is metal, likely cast aluminum. The bail assembly is plastic and cast aluminum, and handle is cast aluminum (the bail wire is SS). The major design issue is the small clearance between the caster’s fingers, when wrapped around the spinning rod, and rotating bail. It's basically a poor design, with fab issues. This reel never was manufactured for production. I believe the 2 reels sent me were prototypes. It would have been a flop if that reel ever went into production without major modifications. There were a number of excellent reels available at that time ( '80's) - RU-MER,s, LUXOR's, QUICK’s, MITCHELL’s, CENTAURE's, PENN’s, etc.

ORVIS carried spinning reels made in Italy- in 3 sizes of a very simple and reliable design. I believe the ORVIS reels were excellent reels. Being primarily known for their fly fishing tackle, I don't think they "pushed" spinning equipment to enthusiastically. Perhaps they thought the market had too many spinning reels available. 

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