Belmo

Growing Raspberries

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I got a spring project to yank a giant bramble-type plant that has become completely overgrown -- it's a forsythia-type bush -- and to plant raspberries in its place. It's between us and our neighbor, and she's on board: she likes the idea of a more attractive, edible border, and she likes even more the notion of getting raspberries on her side. 


I think I have the mechanics of planting down, how to plant them, how far apart and all that. Because it's a border, we will be doing only one row: I think it will be about 25 feet long, but I gotta go out and actually measure it. 

 

But I'm interested in whether anyone has any advice on plants: what varieties to grow, how to grow them, etc. After a bit of research, I'm leaning more toward the everbearing types, because I like the idea of getting multiple smaller harvests rather than one big one (knowing us, we'd get a zillion berries at once when we are too busy to pick 'em). 
 

Does anyone have any tricks, tips, suggestions, about the plants, and/or where is a good place to get baby raspberry plants? 

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Make sure you kill the blackberry before you plant anything in it's place.

 

It is a noxious weed here in Oz

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Edited by MickAff

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30 mins ago, MickAff said:

Sorry, just looked up forsythia plant

 

Did you mean this instead???

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It's not a forsythia, but it's something similar: some kind of woody shrub that has thorns, and is about head-high, and totally overgrown. 

Pulling it out is going to be a pretty big job, but once that's done, I'm not worried about it coming back. 

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I have raspberries that I planted about 15 years ago, and they are wonderful with the main crop hitting in late June and a second round, with very few berries hitting in late Sept. Raspberries can be kind of obnoxious too, they spread via the root system. We put away Jelly and syrup each year (nothing like raspberry syrup on waffles!). You have to remember to remove the dead canes at the end of the season.

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Belmo,

 

My parents have thornless blackberries, raspberries and black raspberries.    The black raspberries are the best, hands down.  Especially in a jam. The thornless is a huge boon when you are picking them.

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Growing up we had loads of raspberries along the edge of the woods and a small patch in the middle of the yard. Our neighbor had black raspberries. We kids would sneak over and grab them whenever we could. They were my favorite. 

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When I was at wvu ag school working on graduate project with acid mind soils we found that blueberries grew well on slightly acidic soil not sure if raspberries would be similar but something to consider I would take some soil sample on where you to know them to grow well and try to duplicate those conditions have the soil tested for ph, elements etc 

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I've had a thornless variety raspberry patch for over 35 years. They are aggressive growers. Your one row will end up bigger and wider than what you started with so plan accordingly. I cut back the older dead canes in the fall, down to the ground, and prune the rest of the raspberry bush to about waist height; it makes for a nice healthy and tidy bush.They really don't require much care. I'd say in general they like sun; but not all day full sun. We make a raspberry/vodka/sugar concoction (hooch as we call it) that's pretty yummy...good luck

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On 1/9/2018 at 9:44 AM, Belmo said:

I got a spring project to yank a giant bramble-type plant that has become completely overgrown -- it's a forsythia-type bush -- and to plant raspberries in its place. It's between us and our neighbor, and she's on board: she likes the idea of a more attractive, edible border, and she likes even more the notion of getting raspberries on her side. 


I think I have the mechanics of planting down, how to plant them, how far apart and all that. Because it's a border, we will be doing only one row: I think it will be about 25 feet long, but I gotta go out and actually measure it. 

 

But I'm interested in whether anyone has any advice on plants: what varieties to grow, how to grow them, etc. After a bit of research, I'm leaning more toward the everbearing types, because I like the idea of getting multiple smaller harvests rather than one big one (knowing us, we'd get a zillion berries at once when we are too busy to pick 'em). 
 

Does anyone have any tricks, tips, suggestions, about the plants, and/or where is a good place to get baby raspberry plants? 

I don't recall the varieties a friend was growing but he had huge tasty black and purple varieties.  These were planted for market and not everbearing types anyway.  Robust plants for sure.   Only thing I can add is he used a two wire system to contain them, two wires about 3 feet high and about 3 feet apart.  Left only the new canes inside the wires, everything else gone.

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