Big Will

Targeting big tiles

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On 1/26/2018 at 8:49 PM, BrianBM said:

It's an interesting thought.  West Coast boats that do this provide far more civilized accommodations for their passengers then any local boat I've seen, save the Viking 5-Star, and at 60' that boat isn't really big enough for that kind of excursion. 

 

Herewith my $0.02 on the right boat. Fuel won't always be this cheap. Make it a 100' - 120' catamaran with X-bows, I think, and provide electrical power sockets on a separate genset circuit for powered reels ($25 fee to unlock a socket for you, sir) and possibly big live bait tubes, removable, so the boat can carry live 3-lb. to 5-lb. bluefish for shark and marlin trips. Keep a mate busy on the way out removing the dead baits and rigging them for the trolling rotation; mount a greenstick, like the 5-star carries, as well as outriggers. Arneson drives might complicate trolling but need to be reviewed in detail because they're very fuel-thrifty; shrouded props that can be rotated might be better. And there's no reason why the handrail shouldn't be heated, too.

 

I hereby copyright this design concept and anybody who builds this boat has to pay me a design fee.  :)

 

 

I love it!

I think you should go for it:)

JD

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10 hours ago, jjdbike said:

I love it!

I think you should go for it:)

JD

I second that. I want to go to the Grand Banks though. Big cod, halibut, sword, tuna. What more could you ask for. Probably better to launch from mass though in that case. 

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8 mins ago, Big Will said:

I second that. I want to go to the Grand Banks though. Big cod, halibut, sword, tuna. What more could you ask for. Probably better to launch from mass though in that case. 

I’m in!

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I've done Tilefishing for a good 6-7 years for a few trips on vikings a year. And I am just going to share a few of my cents:

 

As Capt. Steven Sr. said, keep your rig simple. Keep the bait simple. Salmon, bluefish or eels are more common bait that people will bring on boat. I've seen people bring herrings or bunkers also. They also provide squid and clam. But doesn't matter what you use, keep it simple on the rig. Strip of meat (salmon) with skin punch though the hook and let it flap. Make it look natural.

 

I've seen people clump their clam, squid, fish and whatever else on their double hook and go down with it. It will create rotation while going down AND tangles with neighbors 99% of the time. Keep it simple.

 

Also you mention you got a 8' rod for the party boat. I'd say that's a little too long for it. I have a 7' hooker rod and a custom seeker that's cut down to 7'6". The hooker rod feels perfect to fish while having it lean against the rail and to swing smaller fish over. My custom feels a bit more clumsy due to the length. It constantly hit the top and also require more room to land the fish when they are being gaffed. 

 

More often enough in August everyone goes on the boat brings tuna gears to at least try for them when they are in the warmer waters. I've only seen them caught once but heard of many stories they got the hit while fishing deep water for tiles. One story was the bait was on the way down and it was taken and went for a ride. No tilefish gear was able to hold it and it just broke off after a good non-stop run. But viking customers troll for them all the time when they are in territory. 

 

If you go far enough (depends on your trip) you will be able to target snowy and other species. On one of my 5 days trip on viking, we had only a handful of snowy but tons of big silver eels. We end up using those for bait. But that's fishing.

 

The same trip we also see Mahi Mahi swim around the boat to eat up scraps that we throw down. There were a few manage to catch them on a spinning rod just dipped in the water with a jig or even a rigged clam. That was fun to watch.

 

Electric reels are good for the deeper drops and heavy/current sea. But you should know how to use them. More than often you can't feel your sinker/bite and ends up tangling with neighbors. I had fished with a pro that just know what to do. No tangle can be avoid, just don't be an idiot. I don't have one, but I wish I had when 5lb of sinker is needed for 600ft+ water that's flying 1kt..... fish were being caught also....

 

 

 

 

Edited by foxfai

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8 hours ago, foxfai said:

I've done Tilefishing for a good 6-7 years for a few trips on vikings a year. And I am just going to share a few of my cents:

 

As Capt. Steven Sr. said, keep your rig simple. Keep the bait simple. Salmon, bluefish or eels are more common bait that people will bring on boat. I've seen people bring herrings or bunkers also. They also provide squid and clam. But doesn't matter what you use, keep it simple on the rig. Strip of meat (salmon) with skin punch though the hook and let it flap. Make it look natural.

 

I've seen people clump their clam, squid, fish and whatever else on their double hook and go down with it. It will create rotation while going down AND tangles with neighbors 99% of the time. Keep it simple.

 

Also you mention you got a 8' rod for the party boat. I'd say that's a little too long for it. I have a 7' hooker rod and a custom seeker that's cut down to 7'6". The hooker rod feels perfect to fish while having it lean against the rail and to swing smaller fish over. My custom feels a bit more clumsy due to the length. It constantly hit the top and also require more room to land the fish when they are being gaffed. 

 

More often enough in August everyone goes on the boat brings tuna gears to at least try for them when they are in the warmer waters. I've only seen them caught once but heard of many stories they got the hit while fishing deep water for tiles. One story was the bait was on the way down and it was taken and went for a ride. No tilefish gear was able to hold it and it just broke off after a good non-stop run. But viking customers troll for them all the time when they are in territory. 

 

If you go far enough (depends on your trip) you will be able to target snowy and other species. On one of my 5 days trip on viking, we had only a handful of snowy but tons of big silver eels. We end up using those for bait. But that's fishing.

 

The same trip we also see Mahi Mahi swim around the boat to eat up scraps that we throw down. There were a few manage to catch them on a spinning rod just dipped in the water with a jig or even a rigged clam. That was fun to watch.

 

Electric reels are good for the deeper drops and heavy/current sea. But you should know how to use them. More than often you can't feel your sinker/bite and ends up tangling with neighbors. I had fished with a pro that just know what to do. No tangle can be avoid, just don't be an idiot. I don't have one, but I wish I had when 5lb of sinker is needed for 600ft+ water that's flying 1kt..... fish were being caught also....

 

 

 

 

Thanks for the advice. I’ve fished with the Viking before so I know the general deal but this is a special trip so I was wondering how to get the most out of it. I like the idea of salmon and eels. I like my 8 foot rod, it’s very heavy and meant for this kind of fishing as well as jigging for big tuna. I’m going to pair it with my avet hx 2 speed so if I hook a tuna I’m good, both the rod and reel are capable of handling 30 pounds of drag and the rod is more of a rail rod so the length isn’t a big deal. I find it an advantage on a big boat. I’ll also be bringing a tuna setup loaded with braid and a smaller topshot than I’d normally use to deep drop for sword or tuna at night just in case. I also have a backup 7’3” blackhole and a torium if I want something lighter and I’ll be sure to bring a spinning setup for Mahi. I imagine some of the drops are going to be very deep, but I don’t like electrics because that’s not fishing. That must have sucked with the silver eels lol. The other times I’ve went we were trying to get through all the pollack down there, they would hit as soon as the sinker touched the bottom and it would be double headers every drop. 

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1 hour ago, BrianBM said:

"Silver eels" are ocean pout or something else entirely?

 

I'll bet strips of bluefish or mackerel would be fine too. 

They’re different. The only time I’ve ever caught a silver eel is off a jetty in south jersey and the thing was over 4 feet long. I didn’t even know they were out there in water that deep. 

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8 hours ago, BrianBM said:

"Silver eels" are ocean pout or something else entirely?

 

I'll bet strips of bluefish or mackerel would be fine too. 

Ocean Pout are something entirely different. Ugly, yellow, slimey & must be returned.

JD

IMG_6480-640x833.jpg

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1 hour ago, jjdbike said:

Ocean Pout are something entirely different. Ugly, yellow, slimey & must be returned.

JD

IMG_6480-640x833.jpg

Pout are great on the grill. Firm & white. Not sure if you can keep them these days6761472f_PoutKabobs.jpeg

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Posted (edited) · Report post

7 hours ago, jjdbike said:

Ocean Pout are something entirely different. Ugly, yellow, slimey & must be returned.

JD

IMG_6480-640x833.jpg

I’ve heard people refer to these as conger eels, which is completely wrong. Isn’t pout a type of fish and not even in the eel family?

Edited by Big Will

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Ate one once.  Ocean pout aka Louie aka whatever moniker some PBs use to refer to the ocean pout and in some cases incorrectly as the conger eel.  They are a fish and very much edible.  The flavor and texture is a cross between the sea devil and tog. 

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14 hours ago, Big Will said:

They’re different. The only time I’ve ever caught a silver eel is off a jetty in south jersey and the thing was over 4 feet long. I didn’t even know they were out there in water that deep. 

Guessing you got a big ass American eel and not a silver.

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1 min ago, Fly By Nite said:

Guessing you got a big ass American eel and not a silver.

Maybe. But the coloration was different. It was silver and black. 

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Yes - my 8 ft XH ugly stick is basically a rail rod now after I modified the foregrip. I only manual crank and love resting the rod on the rail. 

 

false albacore is great tile bait as it stays on very well with the thick skin 

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Yes - my 8 ft XH ugly stick is basically a rail rod now after I modified the foregrip. I only manual crank and love resting the rod on the rail. 

 

false albacore is great tile bait as it stays on very well with the thick skin 

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